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Alfred Street
Alfred Street is a street running between the High Street to the north and the junction with Blue Boar Street and Bear Lane at the southern end, in central Oxford, England.Alfred Street, Oxford
UK.
To the south is Christ Church, one of 's historic colleges. The Bear is an historic located on the west side of Alfred Street at th ...
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The Bear Oxford
''The'' () is a grammatical article in English, denoting persons or things already mentioned, under discussion, implied or otherwise presumed familiar to listeners, readers, or speakers. It is the definite article in English. ''The'' is the most frequently used word in the English language; studies and analyses of texts have found it to account for seven percent of all printed English-language words. It is derived from gendered articles in Old English which combined in Middle English and now has a single form used with pronouns of any gender. The word can be used with both singular and plural nouns, and with a noun that starts with any letter. This is different from many other languages, which have different forms of the definite article for different genders or numbers. Pronunciation In most dialects, "the" is pronounced as (with the voiced dental fricative followed by a schwa) when followed by a consonant sound, and as (homophone of pronoun '' thee'') when followed by a ...
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William Wilkinson (architect)
William Wilkinson (1819–1901) was a British Gothic Revival architect who practised in Oxford, England. Family Wilkinson's father was a builder in Witney in Oxfordshire. William's elder brother George Wilkinson (1814–1890) was also an architect, as were William's nephews C.C. Rolfe (died 1907) and H.W. Moore (1850–1915). Career Most of Wilkinson's buildings are in Oxfordshire. His major works include the Randolph Hotel in Oxford, completed in 1864. He was in partnership with his nephew H.W. Moore from 1881. In his long career Wilkinson had a number of pupils, including H.J. Tollit (1835–1904). Works Churches In 1841, at the age of only 22, Wilkinson designed a new Church of England parish church, Holy Trinity at Lew, Oxfordshire. His other work on churches included: *St Leonard's parish church, Eynsham: restoration, 1856 *Witney Cemetery: lodge and two chapels, 1857 *Witney Workhouse: chapel, 1860 *All Saints' parish church, Middleton Cheney, Northamptonshire: ...
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Macmillan Publishers
Macmillan Publishers (occasionally known as the Macmillan Group; formally Macmillan Publishers Ltd and Macmillan Publishing Group, LLC) is a British publishing company traditionally considered to be one of the 'Big Five' English language publishers. Founded in London in 1843 by Scottish brothers Daniel and Alexander MacMillan, the firm would soon establish itself as a leading publisher in Britain. It published two of the best-known works of Victorian era children’s literature, Lewis Carroll's ''Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'' (1865) and Rudyard Kipling's '' The Jungle Book'' (1894). Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Harold Macmillan, grandson of co-founder Daniel, was chairman of the company from 1964 until his death in December 1986. Since 1999, Macmillan has been a wholly owned subsidiary of Holtzbrinck Publishing Group with offices in 41 countries worldwide and operations in more than thirty others. History Macmillan was founded in London in 1843 by D ...
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Pusey Street
Pusey Street links the wide thoroughfare of St Giles' Street (opposite St John's College) to the east with St John Street to the west in the St John Street area of central Oxford, England. Pusey Street, formerly called Alfred Street, was renamed in honour of Edward Bouverie Pusey in 1926. The renaming also avoided confusion with another Alfred Street to the south. The street is bordered by two educational establishments of Oxford University. On the north side of the street is the Permanent Private Hall Regent's Park. This includes a large white building on the corner with St Giles' called Wheeler Robinson House, the ground floor of which is occupied by an Oxfam bookshop. To the south are St Cross College and Pusey House, founded in 1884. Pusey House Chapel is on the corner with St Giles'. Pusey Lane off Pusey Street was renamed from Alfred Lane at the same time as Pusey Street was renamed. MG Cars of Morris Motors manufactured the MG 14/28 car here from 1924 until t ...
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Brian Smith (architect)
Brian Smith may refer to: Academics and educators *Sir Brian Smith (chemist) (born 1933), British university administrator * Brian David Smith (born 1961), academic researcher, author and adviser in the area of strategic management *Brian Cantwell Smith, Dean of the Faculty of Information Studies at the University of Toronto * Brian K. Smith, associate professor of Information Sciences and Technology at Pennsylvania State University Arts and entertainment * Brian Smith (New Zealand musician) (born 1939), jazz saxophonist * Brian Smith (Canadian musician) (born 1949), guitarist of the rock band Trooper * Brian Smith (photographer) (born 1959), American sports and celebrity portrait photographer * Brian Reffin Smith (born 1946), British writer, artist and teacher * Brian Thomas Smith (born 1977), American actor and comedian * Brian J. Smith (born 1981), American actor * Brian Michael Smith (born 1983), American actor * Brian Smith (American musician) (born 1990), American musician wi ...
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture (or pointed architecture) is an architectural style that was prevalent in Europe from the late 12th to the 16th century, during the High and Late Middle Ages, surviving into the 17th and 18th centuries in some areas. It evolved from Romanesque architecture and was succeeded by Renaissance architecture. It originated in the Île-de-France and Picardy regions of northern France. The style at the time was sometimes known as ''opus Francigenum'' (lit. French work); the term ''Gothic'' was first applied contemptuously during the later Renaissance, by those ambitious to revive the architecture of classical antiquity. The defining design element of Gothic architecture is the pointed or ogival arch. The use of the pointed arch in turn led to the development of the pointed rib vault and flying buttresses, combined with elaborate tracery and stained glass windows. At the Abbey of Saint-Denis, near Paris, the choir was reconstructed between 1140 and 1144, ...
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St Columba's United Reformed Church, Oxford
St Columba's United Reformed Church is a congregation of the United Reformed Church (URC) in the centre of the city of Oxford. It is located on Alfred Street, off the High Street. History It was founded as a chaplaincy to Presbyterian students in Oxford in 1908 and was initially a joint initiative by the Church of Scotland, the United Free Church of Scotland, and the Presbyterian Church of England. It became a congregation of the Presbyterian Church of England in 1929, and on the union of the Presbyterian and Congregational churches in 1972, a congregation of the United Reformed Church (URC). The church continues to provide a chaplaincy to students in the University of Oxford from Reformed, Presbyterian and Congregational church backgrounds. The congregation has included John Buchan (an elder), Ran Laurie and his son Hugh, and Guy Warrack (organist). Building The church building dates to 1915, and was designed by T. P. Figgis. The foundation stone was laid by James Bryce, 1 ...
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Merton Street Tennis Court
Merton Street tennis court is the home of the Oxford University Real Tennis Club. It stands on the north side of Merton Street in central Oxford, England, and forms part of Merton College, Oxford, Merton College. There has been a tennis court in Oxford since 1450 and one at the Merton Street site since c. 1494, according to one source. Alternatively, according to another source, Oxford has had a court since 1595 and one at this site when it was rebuilt in 1798. The Merton Street court, being early, has somewhat non-standard dimensions, and in particular an unusually flat tambour (a buttress used as part of the court). It is the smallest court in England and the second oldest. See also * Oriel Square tennis court References Bibliography

* ''Tennis and Oxford'' by Jeremy Potter; 1st edition of 1994; 152 pp in 8vo and dw. {{coord , 51.7517, -1.2519, type:landmark_region:GB-OXF, display=title Real tennis venues Sport at the University of Oxford History of Oxford Merton Col ...
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Oriel Square Tennis Court
__NOTOC__ The Oriel Square tennis court was a real tennis court that was located in Oriel Square, central Oxford, England. The ''Liber Albus'' mentions the Oriel court being in Vinehall Lane in 1577.Crossley, Alan (editor), 'Social and Cultural Activities', ''A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 4: The City of Oxford'' (1979) — Oxford University PresBritish History Online Charles I played tennis here with his nephew Prince Rupert in December 1642 and King Edward VII had his first tennis lesson here in 1859. The court survived until 1923, when it was used as a lecture hall by Oriel College, though it may have seen earlier use as a theatre. The site is now the location of Oriel College's Harris Building, used for student accommodation, a seminar room and lecture theatre. The only active court left in the city is the Merton Street tennis court. Further reading * ''Tennis and Oxford'' by Jeremy Potter; 1st edition of 1994; 152 pp in 8vo and dw. References 1923 dis ...
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Real Tennis
Real tennis – one of several games sometimes called "the sport of kings" – is the original racquet sport from which the modern game of tennis (also called "lawn tennis") is derived. It is also known as court tennis in the United States, formerly royal tennis in England and Australia, and ''courte-paume'' in France (to distinguish it from longue-paume, and in reference to the older, racquetless game of '' jeu de paume'', the ancestor of modern handball and racquet games). Many French real tennis courts are at ''jeu de paume'' clubs. The term ''real'' was first used by journalists in the early 20th century as a retronym to distinguish the ancient game from modern ''lawn'' tennis (even though, at present, the latter sport is seldom contested on lawns outside the few social-club-managed estates such as Wimbledon). There are more than 50 active real tennis courts in the world, located in the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States and France. Other countries have ...
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Holywell Press
Holywell Press Ltd is a family printing and publishing company based in Oxford, England. The firm was established in 1890 by Harry Burrows and Jack Doe. A major customer has been the University of Oxford, including publication of the university student magazine ''Isis'' for many years. It also produced early advertising for Morris cars. Harry Burrows was a personal friend of the founder William Morris (later Lord Nuffield). The company took its name from the Holywell Room in Oxford. Initially, the company premises were in the octagonal former Chapel of St Mary at the junction of Broad Street and Catte Street, now part of Hertford College. In 1920/1, it moved to the Maclaren Gymnasium in Alfred Street, with much more room for printing. In 1989, it moved to a purpose-built factory building in Ferry Hinksey Road Ferry Hinksey Road is a road in west Oxford, England, leading south from the Botley Road. The road leads to the Osney Mead Industrial Estate to the east, started ...
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William Morris
William Morris (24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was a British textile designer, poet, artist, novelist, architectural conservationist, printer, translator and socialist activist associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement. He was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he helped win acceptance of socialism in ''fin de siècle'' Great Britain. Morris was born in Walthamstow, Essex, to a wealthy middle-class family. He came under the strong influence of medievalism while studying Classics at Oxford University, there joining the Birmingham Set. After university, he married Jane Burden, and developed close friendships with Pre-Raphaelite artists Edward Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti and with Neo-Gothic architect Philip Webb. Webb and Morris designed Red House in Kent where Morris lived from 1859 to 1865, before moving ...
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