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2016 Mississippi Democratic Primary
The 2016 Mississippi Democratic presidential primary took place on March 8 in the U.S. state of Mississippi as one of the Democratic Party's primaries ahead of the 2016 presidential election. On the same day, the Democratic Party held a second primary in Michigan, while the Republican Party held primaries in four states, including their own Mississippi primary. Opinion polling Results Results by county Analysis After losing badly in Mississippi to Barack Obama eight years earlier, Hillary Clinton managed a 66-point routing against Bernie Sanders in the state in 2016. She carried all counties and won across all demographics, income levels and educational attainment levels. The key to Clinton's success, however, was an 89-11 showing among African American voters, who made up 71% of the Democratic electorate in the state. Mississippi gave Clinton her largest win in any state during the 2016 primaries. References {{2016 Democratic primaries Mississippi Democratic prima ...
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Hillary Clinton By Gage Skidmore 2
Hilary or Hillary may refer to: * Hillary Coast, Antarctica * Hilary (name), or Hillary, a given name and surname * Hilary term, the spring term at the Universities of Oxford and Dublin * ''Hikari no Densetsu'', a 1985 manga series, known in Italian as ''Hilary'' * Hurricane Hilary, the name of several storms * ''Hillary'' (film), a 2020 American documentary film about Hillary Clinton * HMS ''Hilary'' See also * Hillery (other) * Saint Hilary (other) * Saint-Hilaire (other) * Ilar (other), Welsh form of the name Hilary * Eleri (other), Welsh form of the name Hilarus * Hillarys, Western Australia {{disambiguation ...
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Benton County, Mississippi
Benton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,729. Its county seat is Ashland. It is locally believed that residents convinced the post-Civil War Reconstruction government that Benton County was named after U.S. Senator Thomas Hart Benton, but the name actually honored Confederate Brigadier General Samuel Benton of nearby Holly Springs in Marshall County, nephew of the senator. Benton County is included in the Memphis, TN-MS-AR Metropolitan Statistical Area. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of , of which is land and (0.5%) is water. It is the fifth-smallest county by area in Mississippi. The headwaters of the Wolf River meander and braid their way north and west across northern Benton County from Baker's Pond, the river's source spring (highest origin of continuous flow) in the Holly Springs National Forest approximately one mile southwest of where U.S. Highway 72 passes ...
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Forrest County, Mississippi
Forrest County is located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 74,934. Its county seat and largest city is Hattiesburg. The county was created from Perry County in 1908 and named in honor of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general in the American Civil War and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. Forrest County is part of the Hattiesburg, MS Metropolitan Statistical Area. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of , of which is land and (0.8%) is water. Major highways * Interstate 59 * U.S. Highway 11 * U.S. Highway 49 * U.S. Highway 98 * Mississippi Highway 13 * 20px Mississippi Highway 42 Adjacent counties * Jones County (northeast) * Perry County (east) * Stone County (south) * Pearl River County (southwest) * Lamar County (west) * Covington County (northwest) National protected area * De Soto National Forest (part) Demographics As of the census of 2000, there were 72,604 people, ...
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DeSoto County, Mississippi
DeSoto County is a county located on the northwest border of the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 161,252, making it the third-most populous county in Mississippi. Its county seat is Hernando. DeSoto County is part of the Memphis, TN-MS-AR Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is the second-most populous county in the MSA. The county has lowland areas that were developed in the 19th century for cotton plantations, and hill country in the eastern part of the county. History The county is named for Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto, the first European explorer known to reach the Mississippi River. The county seat, Hernando, is also named in his honor. De Soto reportedly died in that area in May 1542, although some accounts suggest that he died near Lake Village, Arkansas. See here for a list of sites associated with the 16th-century De Soto Expedition. Early history Indian artifacts collected in DeSoto County link it with prehistoric groups of Woodla ...
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Covington County, Mississippi
Covington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,568. Its county seat is Collins. The county is named for U.S. Army officer and Congressman Leonard Covington. History Covington County was established on January 5, 1819, less than two years after Mississippi earned statehood into the Union. The county was one of the first counties established out of the vast non-agricultural lands in the more eastern part of the state. Covington was originally cut out of Lawrence and Wayne Counties, and encompassed what is now Jefferson Davis, Covington, and Jones Counties. In 1823, part of Covington County became Bainbridge County, most likely named after William Bainbridge, who became an American naval hero during the War of 1812. The next year, in 1824, the Mississippi legislature did away with Bainbridge County, giving its lands back to Covington County. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total a ...
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Copiah County, Mississippi
Copiah County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 29,449. The county seat is Hazlehurst. With an eastern border formed by the Pearl River, Copiah County is part of the Jackson, MS Metropolitan Statistical Area. History Copiah, from a Choctaw Indian word meaning ''calling panther'', was organized in 1823 as Mississippi's 18th county. In the year of county organization, Walter Leake served as governor and James Monroe as President of the United States. In 2004 Calling Panther Lake, commemorating this name, was opened up just West and North of Crystal Springs near the Jack and New Zion community. Soon after the Choctaw Indians relinquished their claims to this land in 1819 and the legislature formed Copiah County in 1823, Elisha Lott, a Methodist minister who had worked among the Indians, brought his family from Hancock County to a location near the present site of Crystal Springs. When the New Orleans, Jackson and Great No ...
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Coahoma County, Mississippi
Coahoma County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 26,151. Its county seat is Clarksdale. The Clarksdale, MS Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Coahoma County. It is located in the Mississippi Delta region of Mississippi. History Coahoma County was established February 9, 1836, and is located in the northwestern part of the state in the fertile Yazoo Delta region. The name "Coahoma" is a Choctaw word meaning "red panther." The act creating the county defined its limits as follows: Beginning at the point where the line between townships 24 and 25 of the surveys of the late Choctaw cession intersects the Mississippi River, and running thence up the said river to the point where the dividing line between the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes of Indians intersects the same; thence with the dividing line to the point where the line between ranges two and three of the survey of the said Choctaw cession intersects the same ...
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Clay County, Mississippi
Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 20,634. Its county seat is West Point. Its name is in honor of American statesman Henry Clay, member of the United States Senate from Kentucky and United States Secretary of State in the 19th century. The federal government formerly designated Clay County as the West Point Micropolitan Statistical Area, but the county lost that status in 2013. It is part of the Golden Triangle region of the state. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of , of which is land and (1.4%) is water. Major highways * U.S. Highway Alternate 45 * Mississippi Highway 25 * Mississippi Highway 46 * Mississippi Highway 47 * 20px Mississippi Highway 50 Adjacent counties * Chickasaw County (north) * Monroe County (northeast) * Lowndes County (southeast) * Oktibbeha County (south) * Webster County (west) National protected area * Natchez Trace Parkway (part) De ...
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Clarke County, Mississippi
Clarke County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 16,732. Its county seat is Quitman. Clarke County is named for Joshua G. Clarke, the first Mississippi state chancellor and judge. The county is part of the Meridian, MS Micropolitan Statistical Area. History Before white men first arrived, the Choctaw Indians inhabited the land that would later be known as the Clarke County, Mississippi. Clarke County is only a portion of what was known as Okla Hannali or Six Town District of the Choctaws. Okla Hannali or Six Towns District existed at the time of the Dancing Rabbit Treaty in 1830. David Gage, who came to the area in about 1820, was a Presbyterian minister. Traveling with him was Moses Jewel and Miss Skinner, who were both teachers. He settled at a place called Eewennans in the Choctaw Nation. David Gage, Moses Jewel, and Miss Skinner came to the territory for the purpose of educating the Indians some domestic habits.Recol ...
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Claiborne County, Mississippi
Claiborne County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,604. Its county seat is Port Gibson. The county is named after William Claiborne, the second governor of the Mississippi Territory. Claiborne County is included in the Vicksburg, MS Micropolitan Statistical Area as well as the Jackson-Vicksburg-Brookhaven, MS Combined Statistical Area. It is bordered by the Mississippi River on the west and the Big Black River on the north. According to the United States Census Bureau, this small county has the third-highest percentage of African-American residents of any U.S. county, an 84% majority of the population. Located south of the area known as the Mississippi Delta, this area was long a center of cotton plantations and related agriculture. Many African Americans have stayed here because of family ties and making the land their own. Claiborne County was the center of a little-known but profound demonstration and struggle durin ...
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Choctaw County, Mississippi
Choctaw County is a county located in the central part of the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,547. Its northern border is the Big Black River, which flows southwest into the Mississippi River south of Vicksburg. The county seat is Ackerman. The county is named after the Choctaw tribe of Native Americans. They had long occupied this territory as their homeland before European exploration. Under the Indian Removal Act of 1830, they were forced by the United States to cede their lands and to move west of the Mississippi River to what became Indian Territory (today's state of Oklahoma). History This was one of the first counties organized in central Mississippi after Indian Removal, and it was originally much larger in geography. As the population increased in the Territory, additional counties were organized. For instance, in 1874 Webster County was formed from some of this county, as were Montgomery and Grenada counties. The first county sea ...
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Chickasaw County, Mississippi
Chickasaw County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,392. Its county seats are Houston and Okolona. The county is named for the Chickasaw people, who lived in this area for hundreds of years. Most were forcibly removed to Indian Territory in the 1830s, but some remained and became citizens of the state and the United States. Early in the 20th century, the first agricultural high school in Mississippi opened in the unincorporated community of Buena Vista. Cully Cobb, a pioneer of southern agriculture, long-term farm publisher, and an official of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration in Washington, D.C., was the superintendent of the school from 1908 to 1910. History The Mississippi state legislature created Chickasaw County in 1836, following the cession of the land by the Chickasaw Indians. It was quickly settled by Americans from the east, mainly from the Southern states. By the time of the Civil War, riverfront ...
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Carroll County, Mississippi
Carroll County is a county in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,597. Its county seats are Carrollton and Vaiden. The county is named for Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last surviving signatory of the Declaration of Independence. Carroll County is part of the Greenwood, Micropolitan Statistical Area. Bordered by the Yazoo River on the west and the Big Black River to the east, it is considered within the Mississippi Delta region. Most of its land is in the hill country. The Porter Wagoner song "The Carroll County Accident" was set here. The county is referred to in the third verse of Bobbie Gentry's 1967 hit song, "Ode to Billie Joe". History This area was developed by European Americans for cotton plantations near the rivers. These were dependent on the labor of large gangs of enslaved African Americans. After the American Civil War, many freedmen worked as sharecroppers or tenant farmers on the plantations. Other areas were harvested fo ...
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Calhoun County, Mississippi
Calhoun County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,962. Its county seat is Pittsboro. The county is named after John C. Calhoun, the U.S. Vice President and U.S. Senator from South Carolina. Geography According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of , of which is land and (0.2%) is water. Adjacent counties * Lafayette County (north) * Pontotoc County (northeast) * Chickasaw County (east) * Webster County (south) * Grenada County (southwest) * Yalobusha County (west) Transportation Major highways * Mississippi Highway 8 * Mississippi Highway 9 * Mississippi Highway 32 * 20px Mississippi Highway 9W Airport The Calhoun County Airport is a county-owned public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.2 mi, 1.9 km) southwest of the central business district of Pittsboro, Mississippi. Demographics As of the census of 2000, there were 15,069 people, 6,019 households, and 4,255 families re ...
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Bolivar County, Mississippi
Bolivar County ( ) is a county located on the western border of the U.S. state of Mississippi. As of the 2010 census, the population was 34,145. Its county seats are Rosedale and Cleveland. The county is named in honor of Simón Bolívar, early 19th-century leader of the liberation of several South American colonies from Spain. The Cleveland, Mississippi, Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Bolivar County. It is located in the Mississippi Delta, or Yazoo Basin, of Mississippi. This area was first developed for cotton plantations. Large industrial-scale agricultural operations have reduced the number of farm workers needed, and the population is half of its peak in 1930. Today, soybeans, corn, and rice are also commodity crops. History The county had 18 documented lynchings in the period from 1877 to 1950.Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror' ( ed.), Montgomery, Alabama: Equal Justice Initiative (2017); Geography According to the U.S. Census Burea ...
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