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Wiki
A wiki (/ˈwɪki/ ( listen) WIK-ee) is a website on which users collaboratively modify content and structure directly from the web browser. In a typical wiki, text is written using a simplified markup language and often edited with the help of a rich-text editor.[1] A wiki is run using wiki software, otherwise known as a wiki engine. A wiki engine is a type of content management system, but it differs from most other such systems, including blog software, in that the content is created without any defined owner or leader, and wikis have little implicit structure, allowing structure to emerge according to the needs of the users.[2] There are dozens of different wiki engines in use, both standalone and part of other software, such as bug tracking systems. Some wiki engines are open source, whereas others are proprietary. Some permit control over different functions (levels of access); for example, editing rights may permit changing, adding or removing material
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Ad Hoc
Ad hoc is a Latin phrase meaning "for this". In English, it generally signifies a solution designed for a specific problem or task, non-generalizable, and not intended to be able to be adapted to other purposes (compare with a priori). Common examples are ad hoc organizations, committees, and commissions created at the national or international level for a specific task. In other fields, the term could refer, for example, to a military unit created under special circumstances, a tailor-made suit, a handcrafted network protocol (e.g
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Vanilla Software
Computer software, and sometimes also other computing-related systems like computer hardware or algorithms, are called vanilla when not customized from their original form, meaning that they are used without any customizations or updates applied to them.[1] Vanilla software has become a widespread de facto industry standard, widely used by businesses and individuals. The term comes from the traditional standard flavor of ice cream, vanilla.[2] According to Eric S. Raymond's The New Hacker's Dictionary, "vanilla" means more "default" than "ordinary".[3] Examples of how to use "vanilla" in a sentence:As one of the earliest examples, IBM's mainframe text publishing system BookMaster, provides a default way to specify which parts of a book to publish, called "vanilla", and a fancier way, called "mocha".[4] The term "vanilla" is sometimes also used for hardware components
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Maged N. Kamel Boulos
Majid (Majīd مجيد and Mājid alternatively Mājed ماجد) are two closely related names of God in Islam, meaning "Majestic" and "Magnificent"
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Browser Extension
A browser extension is a plug-in that extends the functionality of a web browser. Some extensions are authored using web technologies such as HTML, JavaScript, and CSS.[1] Others are developed using machine code and application programming interfaces (APIs) provided by web browsers, such as NPAPI and PPAPI. Browser extensions can change the user interface of the web browser without directly affecting viewable content of a web page; for example, by adding a browser toolbar.Contents1 History 2 Installation 3 Functions 4 Development 5 Unwanted behavior 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
started supporting extensions from version 5 released in 1999.[2] Firefox
Firefox
has supported extensions since its launch in 2004. The Opera desktop web browser supported extensions from version 10 released in 2009
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Online Rich-text Editor
An online rich-text editor is the interface for editing rich text within web browsers, which presents the user with a "what-you-see-is-what-you-get" (WYSIWYG) editing area. The aim is to reduce the effort for users trying to express their formatting directly as valid HTML markup. Though very early browsers could display rich text, user data entry was limited to text boxes with a single font and style (implemented with the <textarea> HTML element). Internet Explorer was the first to add a special "designMode" which allowed formatted parts of a document to be edited by the user using a cursor
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Bug Tracking System
A bug tracking system or defect tracking system is a software application that keeps track of reported software bugs in software development projects. It may be regarded as a type of issue tracking system. Many bug tracking systems, such as those used by most open source software projects, allow end-users to enter bug reports directly.[1] Other systems are used only internally in a company or organization doing software development
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Cold Weather Cycling
Cold-weather biking
Cold-weather biking
or winter biking is the use of a bicycle during months when roads and paths are covered with ice, slush and snow. Cold weather cyclists face a number of challenges. Urban commuters on city streets may have to deal with "[s]now, slush, salt, and sand", which can cause rust and damage to metal bike components.[1] Slush and ice can jam derailleurs.[1] Some cyclists may bike differently in winter, by "...slow[ing] down on turns and brak[ing] gradually" in icy conditions.[2] Gaining traction on snow and ice-covered roads can be difficult.[3] Winter cyclists may use bikes with front and rear fenders,[1] metal studded winter tires[4] and flashing LED lights.[1][3] Winter cyclists may wear layers of warm clothes and "ea[r], face, and han[d]" coverings[5] may be used
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Openness
Openness is an overarching concept or philosophy that is characterized by an emphasis on transparency and free, unrestricted access to knowledge and information, as well as collaborative or cooperative management and decision-making rather than a central authority.[1] Openness can be said to be the opposite of secrecy.[1]Contents1 In government 2 In creative works 3 In education 4 In academia 5 In information technology 6 In psychology 7 See also 8 ReferencesIn government[edit] Main article: Open government Open government is the governing doctrine which hol
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Transparency (human-computer Interaction)
Any change in a computing system, such as a new feature or new component, is transparent if the system after change adheres to previous external interface as much as possible while changing its internal behaviour. The purpose is to shield from change all systems (or human users) on the other end of the interface. Confusingly, the term refers to overall invisibility of the component, it does not refer to visibility of component's internals (as in white box or open system). The term transparent is widely used in computing marketing in substitution of the term invisible, since the term invisible has a bad connotation (usually seen as something that the user can't see and has no control over) while the term transparent has a good connotation (usually associated with not hiding anything)
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Web Community
A web community is a web site (or group of web sites) where specific content or links are only available to its members.[1] A web community may take the form of a social network service, an Internet forum, a group of blogs, or another kind of social software web application. The rise in popularity of Web 2.0
Web 2.0
websites has allowed for easier real-time communication and ability to connect to others as well as producing new ways for information to be exchanged.[2]Contents1 Purpose 2 Types2.1 Blogs 2.2 Bulletin boards 2.3 Social networks3 Popularity 4 Issues4.1 Reliability of information 4.2 Privacy 4.3 Cyber bullying 4.4 Content5 ReferencesPurpose[edit] Web communities provide a platform for a range of services to users. They allow for social interaction across the world between people of different cultures who might not otherwise have met with offline meetings also becoming more common
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User (computing)
A user is a person who uses a computer or network service. Users generally use a system or a software product[1] without the technical expertise required to fully understand it.[1] Power users use advanced features of programs, though they are not necessarily capable of computer programming and system administration.[2][3] A user often has a user account and is identified to the system by a username (or user name). Other terms for username include login name, screenname (or screen name), nickname (or nick) and handle, which is derived from the identical Citizen's Band radio
Citizen's Band radio
term. Some software products provide services to other systems and have no direct end users.Contents1 End user 2 User account2.1 Username format3 Terminology 4 See also 5 ReferencesEnd user[edit] See also: End user End users are the ultimate human users (also referred to as operators) of a software product
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Social Darwinism
The term social Darwinism
Darwinism
is used to refer to various ways of thinking and theories that emerged in the second half of the 19th century and tried to apply the evolutionary concept of natural selection to human society. The term itself emerged in the 1880s, and it gained widespread currency when used after 1944 by opponents of these ways of thinking. The majority of those who have been categorized as social Darwinists did not identify themselves by such a label.[1] Scholars debate the extent to which the various Social Darwinist ideologies reflect Charles Darwin's own views on human social and economic issues
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Web Browser
A web browser (commonly referred to as a browser) is a software application for retrieving, presenting and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web
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WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
(/ˈwɪziwɪɡ/ WIZ-ee-wig)[1] is an acronym for "what you see is what you get". In computing, a WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
editor is a system in which content (text and graphics) can be edited in a form closely resembling its appearance when printed or displayed as a finished product,[2] such as a printed document, web page, or slide presentation.Contents1 Meaning 2 History2.1 Etymology3 Criticism 4 Related acronyms 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMeaning[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The program on the left uses a WYSIWYG
WYSIWYG
editor to produce a Lorem Ipsum document
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Asterisk
؋ ​₳ ​ ฿ ​₿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ₼ ​ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ 元 圆 圓 ​﷼ ​៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥ 円Uncommon typographyasterism ⁂fleuron, hedera ❧index, fist ☞interrobang ‽irony punctuation ⸮lozenge ◊tie ⁀RelatedDiacritics Logic symbolsWhitespace charactersIn other scriptsChinese Hebrew Japanese Korean Category Portal Bookv t eAn asterisk (*); from Late Latin
Late Latin
asteriscus, from Ancient Greek ἀστερίσκος, asteriskos, "little star")[1][2] is a typographical symbol or glyph
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