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Road Signs In Mauritius
Road signs in Mauritius
Mauritius
are standardised traffic signs used in Mauritius
Mauritius
according to the Traffic Signs Regulations 1990. They are heavily modelled on road signs in the United Kingdom, since Mauritius is a former British colony. Mauritius
Mauritius
has left-hand traffic.Contents1 Signing system 2 Priority signs 3 Warning signs 4 Prohibitionary signs 5 Mandatory signs 6 Information signs 7 Other signs 8 ReferencesSigning system[edit] The traffic sign are divided into three classes; circles gives orders, triangles warns of possible dangers and rectangles gives information. Different colours are use within these shapes; blue circles are mandatory signs, it give positive instructions, while red circles are prohibitory signs, it give negative instructions. Blue rectangles give general information while green rectangles are use for direction sign on main roads
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Traffic Signs
Traffic signs or road signs are signs erected at the side of or above roads to give instructions or provide information to road users. The earliest signs were simple wooden or stone milestones. Later, signs with directional arms were introduced, for example, the fingerposts in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and their wooden counterparts in Saxony. With traffic volumes increasing since the 1930s, many countries have adopted pictorial signs or otherwise simplified and standardized their signs to overcome language barriers, and enhance traffic safety. Such pictorial signs use symbols (often silhouettes) in place of words and are usually based on international protocols
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Parking Violation
A parking violation is the act of parking a motor vehicle in a restricted place or for parking in an unauthorized manner. It is against the law virtually everywhere to park a vehicle in the middle of a highway or road; parking on one or both sides of a road, however, is commonly permitted. However, restrictions apply to such parking, and may result in an offense being committed
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Tractor
A tractor is an engineering vehicle specifically designed to deliver at a high tractive effort (or torque) at slow speeds, for the purposes of hauling a trailer or machinery used in agriculture or construction. Most commonly, the term is used to describe a farm vehicle that provides the power and traction to mechanize agricultural tasks, especially (and originally) tillage, but nowadays a great variety of tasks
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Bus
A bus (archaically also omnibus,[1] multibus, motorbus, autobus) is a road vehicle designed to carry many passengers. Buses can have a capacity as high as 300 passengers.[2] The most common type of bus is the single-decker rigid bus, with larger loads carried by double-decker and articulated buses, and smaller loads carried by midibuses and minibuses; coaches are used for longer-distance services. Many types of buses, such as city transit buses and inter-city coaches, charge a fare. Other types, such as elementary or secondary school buses or shuttle buses within a post-secondary education campus do not charge a fare
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Coach (bus)
A coach (also motor coach) is a type of bus used for conveying passengers. In contrast to transit buses that typically used within a single metropolitan region, coaches are used for longer-distance bus service. Often used for intercity—or even international—bus service, other coaches are also used for private charter for various purposes. Deriving the name from horse-drawn carriages and stagecoaches that carried passengers, luggage, and mail, modern motor coaches are almost always high-floor buses, with a separate luggage hold mounted below the passenger compartment. In contrast to transit buses, motor coaches typically feature forward-facing seating, with no provision for standing
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Large Goods Vehicle
A heavy goods vehicle (HGV), also large goods vehicle (LGV) or medium goods vehicle, is the European Union
European Union
(EU) term for any truck with a gross combination mass (GCM) of over 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb).[1] Sub-category N2 is used for vehicles between 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb) and 12,000 kilograms (26,455 lb) and N3 for all goods vehicles over 12,000 kilograms (26,455 lb) as defined in Directive 2001/116/EC. The term medium goods vehicle is used within parts of the UK government to refer to goods vehicles of between 3.5 and 7.5 tonnes which according to the EU are also 'large goods vehicles'.[2] Commercial carrier vehicles of up to 3,500 kilograms (7,716 lb) are referred to as Light commercial vehicles and come into category N1. Confusingly though, parts of the UK government refer to these as 'Light Goods Vehicles' (also abbreviated 'LGV'),[3] with the term 'LGV' appearing on tax discs for these smaller vehicles
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Metre
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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Meter
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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Length
In geometric measurements, length is the most extended dimension of an object.[1] In the International System of Quantities, length is any quantity with dimension distance. In other contexts, length is a measured dimension of an object. Length
Length
may be distinguished from height, which is vertical extent, and width or breadth, which are the distance from side to side, measuring across the object at right angles to the length. For example, it is possible to cut a length of wire shorter than the wire's width
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Speed Limit
Road speed limits are used in most countries to set the maximum (or minimum in some cases) speed at which road vehicles may legally travel on particular stretches of road. Speed limits may be variable and in some places speed is unlimited (e.g. on some Autobahn
Autobahn
sections in Germany). Speed limits are normally indicated on a traffic sign. Speed limits are commonly set by the legislative bodies of nations or provincial governments and enforced by national or regional police or judicial bodies. The first maximum speed limit was the 10 mph (16 km/h) limit introduced in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in 1861. The highest posted speed limit in the world is 160 km/h (99 mph), which applies to some motorways in UAE.[1] However, some roads have no speed limit for certain classes of vehicles
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Km/h
The kilometre per hour (American English: kilometer per hour) is a unit of speed, expressing the number of kilometres travelled in one hour. The SI unit
SI unit
symbol is km/h. Worldwide, it is the most commonly used unit of speed on road signs and car speedometers.[2][3]Contents1 History 2 Notation history2.1 Abbreviations 2.2 Unit symbols 2.3 Alternative abbreviations in official use3 Regulatory use 4 Conversions 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] Although the metre was formally defined in 1799, the term "kilometres per hour" did not come into immediate use – the myriametre (10,000 metres) and myriametre per hour were preferred to kilometres and kilometres per hour
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20 Mph Zone
30 km/h zones (30 kilometres per hour zones) and the similar 20 mph zones (20 miles per hour zones) are forms of speed management used across areas of urban roads in some jurisdictions as an alternative to normal speed limits. The nominal maximum speed limits in these zones are 30 kilometres per hour (19 mph) and 20 miles per hour (32 km/h) respectively. Although these zones do have the nominal speed limit posted, speeds are generally ensured by the use of traffic calming (physical or psychological) measures, though limits with signs and lines only are increasingly used in the UK.[1][2]Contents1 Reasons for implementation1.1 Objectives2 Benefits 3 Disadvantages 4 Prevalence4.1 Europe 4.2 United States 4.3 Mexico 4.4 New Zealand5 ReferencesReasons for implementation[edit] These zones are generally introduced in areas, particularly residential areas, in an attempt to keep road traffic speeds down to a safe level
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Parking
Parking
Parking
is the act of stopping and disengaging a vehicle and leaving it unoccupied. Parking
Parking
on one or both sides of a road is often permitted, though sometimes with restrictions. Some buildings have parking facilities for use of the buildings' users
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Handcart
A cart is a vehicle designed for transport, using two wheels and normally pulled by one or a pair of draught animals. A handcart is pulled or pushed by one or more people. It is different from a dray or wagon, which is a heavy transport vehicle with four wheels and typically two or more horses, or a carriage, which is used exclusively for transporting humans. Over time, the term "cart" has come to mean nearly any small conveyance, from shopping carts to golf carts or UTVs, without regard to number of wheels, load carried, or means of propulsion. The draught animals used for carts may be horses or ponies, mules, oxen, water buffalo or donkeys, or even smaller animals such as goats or large dogs.Contents1 History 2 Types of carts 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Hand-propelled wheel cart, Indus Valley Civilization
Indus Valley Civilization
(3000–1500 BCE)
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Clearway
The term clearway is used in several Commonwealth
Commonwealth
countries to refer to stretches of road or street where parking is limited or prohibited.Contents1 Australia 2 New Zealand 3 United Kingdom 4 Aviation 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesAustralia[edit]Example of a Clearway
Clearway
sign in New South WalesIn Australia, a clearway is a special road upon which only taxis and buses may stop at the kerb on certain times of the day. Any other vehicle which stands at the kerb may be towed away (unless there is some form of emergency). Clearways are used on congested roads where there is no room for additional traffic lanes
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