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Pwn
Pwn
Pwn
is a leetspeak slang term derived from the verb own,[1][2][3] meaning to appropriate or to conquer to gain ownership. The term implies domination or humiliation of a rival,[4] used primarily in the Internet-based video game culture to taunt an opponent who has just been soundly defeated (e.g., "You just got pwned!").[5] In script kiddie jargon, pwn means to compromise or control, specifically another computer (server or PC), website, gateway device, or application. It is synonymous with one of the definitions of hacking or cracking, including iOS jailbreaking
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Gosu
Gosu (고수) is a Korean term used to refer to a highly skilled person. In computer gaming the term is usually used to refer to a person who dominated games like StarCraft, Counter-Strike, Warcraft III, Diablo II, DotA, League of Legends, Heroes of the Storm, and others. The term was adopted by gaming communities in many countries because of a large South Korean presence in online gaming communities.[1]Contents1 Origin 2 Related terms 3 Synonyms 4 See also 5 ReferencesOrigin[edit] The origin of the term is from hanja: 高手, literally "high hand", also meaning pro or highly skilled at something, is used for a person with skill, usually in martial arts or in the game of go.[2] In the dialect of the Gyeongnam province, gosu also has the meaning of "leader".[3] Related terms[edit] Though not as popular, there are also several other commonly used Korean words for describing gamers with various skill levels
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Pronunciation
Pronunciation
Pronunciation
is the way in which a word or a language is spoken. This may refer to generally agreed-upon sequences of sounds used in speaking a given word or language in a specific dialect ("correct pronunciation"), or simply the way a particular individual speaks a word or language. A word can be spoken in different ways by various individuals or groups, depending on many factors, such as: the duration of the cultural exposure of their childhood, the location of their current residence, speech or voice disorders,[1] their ethnic group, their social class, or their education.[2]Contents1 Linguistic terminology 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksLinguistic terminology[edit] Syllables are counted as units of sound (phones) that they use in their language. The branch of linguistics which studies these units of sound is phonetics
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Malware
Malware, short for malicious software, is an umbrella term used to refer to a variety of forms of hostile or intrusive software,[1] including computer viruses, worms, Trojan horses, ransomware, spyware, adware, scareware, and other intentionally harmful programs. It can take the form of executable code, scripts, active content, and other software.[2] Malware
Malware
is defined by its malicious intent, acting against the requirements of the computer user — and so does not include software that causes unintentional harm due to some deficiency. Programs supplied officially by companies can be considered malware if they secretly act against the interests of the computer user
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Keylogger
Keystroke logging, often referred to as keylogging or keyboard capturing, is the action of recording (logging) the keys struck on a keyboard, typically covertly, so that the person using the keyboard is unaware that their actions are being monitored. Data can then be retrieved by the person operating the logging program
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Abuse
Abuse is the improper usage or treatment of an entity, often to unfairly or improperly gain benefit.[1] Abuse can come in many forms, such as: physical or verbal maltreatment, injury, assault, violation, rape, unjust practices, crimes, or other types of aggression.Contents1 Types and contexts of abuse1.1 Abuse of authority 1.2 Ab
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PC Magazine
PC Magazine
PC Magazine
(shortened as PCMag) is an American computer magazine published by Ziff Davis. A print edition was published from 1982 to January 2009. Publication of online editions started in late 1994 and continues to this day.Contents1 History 2 Editor 3 Overview 4 Development and evolution 5 Alternative methods of publication 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In an early review of the new IBM PC, Byte reported "the announcement of a new magazine called PC: The Independent Guide to the IBM Personal Computer. It is published by David Bunnell, of Software Communications, Inc. ... It should be of great interest to owners of the IBM Personal Computer".[1] The first issue of PC, dated February–March 1982,[2] appeared early that year.[3] (The word Magazine was not added to the logo until the first major redesign in January 1986)
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CTV News
CTV News
News
is the news division of the CTV Television Network
CTV Television Network
in Canada. The name CTV News
News
is also applied as the title of local and regional newscasts on the network's owned-and-operated stations (O&Os), which are closely tied to the national news division
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Technology Review
MIT Technology
Technology
Review is a magazine published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[3] It was founded in 1899 as The Technology Review,[4] and was re-launched without "The" in its name on April 23, 1998 under then publisher R. Bruce Journey. In September 2005, it underwent another transition under its then editor-in-chief and publisher, Jason Pontin, to a form resembling the historical magazine. Before the 1998 re-launch, the editor stated that "nothing will be left of the old magazine except the name." It is therefore necessary to distinguish between the modern and the historical Technology Review.[4] The historical magazine had been published by the MIT Alumni Association, was more closely aligned with the interests of MIT alumni, and had a more intellectual tone and much smaller public circulation
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Über
Über (German pronunciation: [ˈyːbɐ] ( listen), sometimes written uber /ˈuːbər/[1]), in English-language publications, is a German language
German language
word meaning "over", "above" or "across." It is an etymological twin with German ober, and is cognate (through Proto-Germanic) with English over, Dutch over, Swedish över and Icelandic yfir, among other Germanic languages. It is also distantly cognate to both Latin super and Greek ὑπέρ (hyper), through Proto-Indo-European. It is relatively well-known within Anglophone communities due to its occasional use as a hyphenated prefix in informal English, usually for emphasis. The German word is properly spelled with an umlaut, while the spelling of the English loanword varies. It is distantly cognate to Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word upari and Hindi
Hindi
uper (both meaning 'above', 'over' or 'up') probably through Proto-Indo-European
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Phishing
Phishing
Phishing
is the attempt to obtain sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and money), often for malicious reasons, by disguising as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication.[1][2] The word is a neologism created as a homophone of fishing due to the similarity of using a bait in an attempt to catch a victim
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Spamming
Electronic spamming is the use of electronic messaging systems to send an unsolicited message (spam), especially advertising, as well as sending messages repeatedly on the same site. While the most widely recognized form of spam is email spam, the term is applied to similar abuses in other media: instant messaging spam, Usenet
Usenet
newsgroup spam, Web search engine
Web search engine
spam, spam in blogs, wiki spam, online classified ads spam, mobile phone messaging spam, Internet forum spam, junk fax transmissions, social spam, spam mobile apps,[1] television advertising and file sharing spam
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Spyware
Spyware
Spyware
is software that aims to gather information about a person or organization without their knowledge, that may send such information to another entity without the consumer's consent, or that asserts control over a device without the consumer's knowledge.[1] "Spyware" is mostly classified into four types: adware, system monitors, tracking cookies, and trojans;[2] examples of other notorious types include digital rights management capabilities that "phone home", keyloggers, rootkits, and web beacons. Spyware
Spyware
is mostly used for the purposes of tracking and storing Internet users' movements on the Web and serving up pop-up ads to Internet users. Whenever spyware is used for malicious purposes, its presence is typically hidden from the user and can be difficult to detect
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