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Polycerate
Polycerate, meaning "many-horned", is a term used to describe animals with more than two horns.Contents1 Cattle 2 Sheep 3 Goats 4 Wildlife 5 Mythology 6 ReferencesCattle[edit] Cattle
Cattle
can have as many as six horns, and occasionally more. Because horns are no longer widely utilized by humans as drinking vessels, musical instruments or in jewellery, farmers prefer to raise polled (hornless) cattle. The lack of horns reduces injuries to humans and other cattle.[1] Sheep[edit] Polycerate
Polycerate
sheep breeds include the Hebridean, Icelandic,[2] Jacob,[3] Manx Loaghtan, Boreray and the Navajo-Churro. One example of a polycerate Shetland sheep was a ram kept by US President Thomas Jefferson for several years in the early 19th century in front of the White House
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Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
(April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1801 to 1809. Previously, he was elected the second Vice President of the United States, serving under John Adams
John Adams
from 1797 to 1801. A proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights motivating American colonists to break from Great Britain and form a new nation, he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level. He was a land owner and farmer. Jefferson was primarily of English ancestry, born and educated in colonial Virginia. He graduated from the College of William & Mary and briefly practiced law, at times defending slaves seeking their freedom
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Antelope
An antelope is a member of a number of even-toed ungulate species indigenous to various regions in Africa
Africa
and Eurasia. Antelopes comprise a wastebasket taxon (miscellaneous group) within the family Bovidae, encompassing those Old World
Old World
species that are not cattle, sheep, buffalo, bison, or goats; even so, antelope are generally more deer-like than other bovids
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Cattle
Cattle—colloquially cows[note 1]—are the most common type of large domesticated ungulates. They are a prominent modern member of the subfamily Bovinae, are the most widespread species of the genus Bos, and are most commonly classified collectively as Bos
Bos
taurus. Cattle
Cattle
are commonly raised as livestock for meat (beef and veal), as dairy animals for milk and other dairy products, and as draft animals (oxen or bullocks that pull carts, plows and other implements). Other products include leather and dung for manure or fuel
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Sheep
The sheep ( Ovis
Ovis
aries) is a quadrupedal, ruminant mammal typically kept as livestock. Like most ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates. Although the name "sheep" applies to many species in the genus Ovis, in everyday usage it almost always refers to Ovis
Ovis
aries. Numbering a little over one billion, domestic sheep are also the most numerous species of sheep. An adult female sheep is referred to as a ewe (/juː/), an intact male as a ram or occasionally a tup, a castrated male as a wether, and a younger sheep as a lamb. Sheep
Sheep
are most likely descended from the wild mouflon of Europe and Asia. One of the earliest animals to be domesticated for agricultural purposes, sheep are raised for fleece, meat (lamb, hogget or mutton) and milk. A sheep's wool is the most widely used animal fiber, and is usually harvested by shearing
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Icelandic Sheep
The Icelandic sheep (Icelandic: íslenska sauðkindin)[2] is a breed of domestic sheep. The Icelandic breed is one of the Northern European short-tailed sheep, which exhibit a fluke-shaped, naturally short tail. The Icelandic is a mid-sized breed, generally short-legged and stocky, with face and legs free of wool. The fleece of the Icelandic sheep is dual-coated and occurs in white and a variety of other colors, including a range of browns, grays, and blacks. They exist in both horned and polled strains. Generally left unshorn for the winter, the breed is very cold-hardy. Multiple births are very common in Icelandic ewes, with a lambing percentage of 175% - 220%. A gene also exists in the breed called the Þoka gene, and ewes carrying it have been known to give birth to triplets, quadruplets, quintuplets, and even sextuplets on occasion. Ewes can be mated as lambs as early as five to seven months, although many farmers wait until the ewe's second winter before allowing them to breed
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Manx Loaghtan
The Manx Loaghtan
Manx Loaghtan
is a rare breed of sheep (Ovis aries) native to the Isle of Man. It is sometimes spelled as Loaghtyn or Loghtan. The sheep have dark brown wool and usually four or occasionally six horns.[2] The Manx Loaghtan
Manx Loaghtan
is one of the Northern European short-tailed sheep breeds and descends from the primitive sheep once found throughout Scotland, the Hebrides, and Shetland Islands. The word Loaghtan comes from the Manx words lugh dhoan, which mean mouse-brown and describes the colour of the sheep.[2] This breed is primarily raised for its meat, which some consider a delicacy. The meat has recently received EU recognition and protection under the Protected Designation of Origin scheme, which requires products to originate in a specific region.[3] The Rare Breeds Survival Trust
Rare Breeds Survival Trust
has characterized the Loaghtan as "at risk"
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Boreray (sheep)
The Boreray, also known as the Boreray Blackface or Hebridean Blackface,[3] is a breed of sheep originating on the St Kilda archipelago off the west coast of Scotland and surviving as a feral animal on one of the islands, Boreray. The breed, was once reared for meat and wool, but is now used mainly for conservation grazing. The Boreray is one of the Northern European short-tailed sheep group of breeds. It is one of the rarest breeds of sheep in the United Kingdom. They are classed as "Category 3: Vulnerable" by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust, because 500-900 breeding ewes are known to exist. They had previously been the only breed classed in "Category 2: Critical" but by 2017 the population had grown.Contents1 St Kilda sheep 2 History 3 Characteristics3.1 Population 3.2 Use in farming4 See also 5 References 6 External linksSt Kilda sheep[edit] St Kilda is a remote archipelago, west of the Outer Hebrides. Several types of sheep have been associated with St Kilda
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Serpent (symbolism)
The serpent, or snake, is one of the oldest and most widespread mythological symbols. The word is derived from Latin serpens, a crawling animal or snake. Snakes have been associated with some of the oldest rituals known to humankind[1][2] and represent dual expression[3] of good and evil.[4] In some cultures, snakes were fertility symbols. For example, the Hopi people of North America
North America
performed an annual snake dance to celebrate the union of Snake
Snake
Youth (a Sky spirit) and Snake
Snake
Girl (an Underworld spirit) and to renew the fertility of Nature. During the dance, live snakes were handled and at the end of the dance the snakes were released into the fields to guarantee good crops
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Cerastes
The cerastes (Greek: κεράστης, English: cerastēs, English translation: "having horns"[1]) is a creature of Greek legend, a serpent that is incredibly flexible—so much so that it is said to have no spine. Cerastae can have either two large ram-like horns or four pairs of smaller horns.[2] The cerastes hides its head in the sand with only the horns protruding out of the surface; this is meant to deceive other animals into thinking it is food. When the animal approaches the cerastes, the cerastes promptly kills it.[2] The legend is most likely derived from the habits of the horned viper, whose genus, Cerastes, is named after the mythological creature
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Blue Wildebeest
C. t. albojubatus (Thomas, 1912) C. t. cooksoni (Blaine, 1914) C. t. johnstoni (Sclater, 1896) C. t. mearnsi (Heller, 1913) C. t. taurinus (Burchell, 1823)Distribution of the subspecies:  C. t. taurinus   C. t. cooksoni   C. t. johnstoni   C. t. albojubatus   C. t. mearnsiThe blue wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), also called the common wildebeest, white-bearded wildebeest or brindled gnu, is a large antelope and one of the two species of wildebeest. It is placed in the genus Connochaetes and family Bovidae and has a close taxonomic relationship with the black wildebeest. The blue wildebeest is known to have five subspecies. This broad-shouldered antelope has a muscular, front-heavy appearance, with a distinctive robust muzzle. Young blue wildebeest are born tawny brown, and begin to take on their adult colouration at the age of two months
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Four-horned Antelope
T. q. iodes (Hodgson, 1847) T. q. quadricornis (de Blainville, 1816) T. q. subquadricornutus (Elliot, 1839)Range map of the four-horned antelopeSynonyms[2]ListAntilope chickara (J. B. Fischer, 1829) A. quadricornis (Desmarest, 1816) Cerophorus quadricornis (J. B. Fischer, 1829) Cervicapra chickara (Hardwicke, 1825) C. quadricornis (de Blainville, 1816) Cervus
Cervus
labipes (Saint-Hillaire and Cuvier, 1832) Grimmia quadricornis (Laurillard, 1839) Tetraceros chickera (Blyth, 1842) Tetracerus chickara (Jardine, 1836) T. paccerois (Houghton, 1847) T. quadricornes (Jardine, 1836) T. striaticornis (Saint-Hillaire and Cuvier, 1832) T. undicornis (Saint-Hillaire and Cuvier, 1832)The four-horned antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis), or chousingha, is a small antelope found in India
India
and Nepal. This antelope has four horns, which distinguish it from most other bovids, which have two horns (sparing a few such as the Jacob sheep)
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Jacob Sheep
The Jacob
Jacob
is a British breed of domestic sheep. It combines two characteristics unusual in sheep: it is piebald—dark-coloured with areas of white wool—and it is often polycerate or multi-horned. It most commonly has four horns. The origin of the breed is not known; broken-coloured polycerate sheep were present in England by the middle of the seventeenth century, and were widespread a century later. A breed society was formed in 1969, and a flock book was published from 1972. The Jacob
Jacob
was kept for centuries as a "park sheep", to ornament the large estates of landowners
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Goat
Capra hircusThe domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of goat domesticated from the wild goat of southwest Asia and Eastern Europe. The goat is a member of the family Bovidae
Bovidae
and is closely related to the sheep as both are in the goat-antelope subfamily Caprinae. There are over 300 distinct breeds of goat.[1] Goats are one of the oldest domesticated species, and have been used for their milk, meat, hair, and skins over much of the world.[2] In 2011, there were more than 924 million live goats around the globe, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.[3] Female goats are referred to as "does" or "nannies", intact males are called "bucks" or "billies" and juveniles of both sexes are called "kids". Castrated males are called "wethers"
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