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Love
Love
Love
encompasses a variety of different emotional and mental states, typically strongly and positively experienced, ranging from the deepest interpersonal affection to the simplest pleasure. An example of this range of meanings is that the love of a mother differs from the love of a spouse differs from the love of food. Most commonly, love refers to a feeling of strong attraction and emotional attachment.[1] Love
Love
can also be a virtue representing human kindness, compassion, and affection—"the unselfish loyal and benevolent concern for the good of another".[2] It may also describe compassionate and affectionate actions towards other humans, one's self or animals.[3] Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
philosophers identified four forms of love: essentially, familial love (in Greek, storge), friendly love (philia), romantic love (eros), and divine love (agape)
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Ren (Confucianism)
Hermeneutic schools:Old TextsNew Text Confucianism Confucianism
Confucianism
by country Confucianism
Confucianism
in IndonesiaKorean ConfucianismJapanese ConfucianismConfucian textsRuzangFour Books:Analects Doctrine of the Mean Great Learning MenciusFive Classics:Classic of Poetry Book of Documents Book of Rites Yijing Spring and Autumn AnnalsOther:Interactions Between Heaven and MankindOrganizationConfucian ritual religionTemple of ConfuciusConfucian churches and sects:Holy Confucian ChurchIndonesian Confucian ChurchUniversal Church of the Way and its VirtuePhoenix churches XuanyuanismShengdao Portal
Portal
Confucianismv t eRen (Chinese: 仁) is the Confucian virtue denoting the good feeling a virtuous human experiences when being altruistic. Ren is exemplified by a normal adult's protective feelings for children
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Friendship
Friendship
Friendship
is a relationship of mutual affection between people.[1] Friendship
Friendship
is a stronger form of interpersonal bond than an association. Friendship
Friendship
has been studied in academic fields such as communication, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, and philosophy. Various academic theories of friendship have been proposed, including social exchange theory, equity theory, relational dialectics, and attachment styles. Although there are many forms of friendship, some of which may vary from place to place, certain characteristics are present in many types of such bonds
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Bhakti
Bhakti
Bhakti
(Sanskrit: भक्ति) literally means "attachment, participation, fondness for, homage, faith, love, devotion, worship, purity".[1] In Hinduism, it refers to devotion to, and love for, a personal god or a representational god by a devotee.[2][3] In ancient texts such as the Shvetashvatara Upanishad, the term simply means participation, devotion and love for any endeavor, while in the Bhagavad Gita, it connotes one of the possible paths of spirituality and towards moksha, as in bhakti marga.[4]
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Chesed
Chesed
Chesed
(חסד, also Romanized ẖesed) is a Hebrew word commonly translated as "loving-kindness," "kindness" or "love." Chesed
Chesed
is central to Jewish ethics
Jewish ethics
and Jewish theology
Jewish theology
and is a common term in the Bible for describing God’s love for mankind and God’s special relationship with the Children of Israel.[1] Chesed
Chesed
is valued by religious Jews of all denominations. It is considered a virtue on its own, and also for its contribution to tikkun olam (repairing the world). It is also considered the foundation of many religious commandments practiced by traditional Jews, especially interpersonal commandments
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Troubadour
A troubadour (English: /ˈtruːbədʊər/, French: [tʁubaduʁ]; Occitan: trobador, IPA: [tɾuβaˈðu]) was a composer and performer of Old Occitan
Old Occitan
lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages (1100–1350). Since the word troubadour is etymologically masculine, a female troubadour is usually called a trobairitz. The troubadour school or tradition began in the late 11th century in Occitania, but it subsequently spread to Italy and Spain. Under the influence of the troubadours, related movements sprang up throughout Europe: the Minnesang
Minnesang
in Germany, trovadorismo in Galicia and Portugal, and that of the trouvères in northern France. Dante Alighieri in his De vulgari eloquentia
De vulgari eloquentia
defined the troubadour lyric as fictio rethorica musicaque poita: rhetorical, musical, and poetical fiction
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Emotion
Emotion
Emotion
is any conscious experience[1][2][3] characterized by intense mental activity and a certain degree of pleasure or displeasure.[4][5] Scientific discourse has drifted to other meanings and there is no consensus on a definition. Emotion
Emotion
is often intertwined with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation.[6] In some theories, cognition is an important aspect of emotion. Those acting primarily on the emotions they are feeling may seem as if they are not thinking, but mental processes are still essential, particularly in the interpretation of events. For example, the realization of our believing that we are in a dangerous situation and the subsequent arousal of our body's nervous system (rapid heartbeat and breathing, sweating, muscle tension) is integral to the experience of our feeling afraid. Other theories, however, claim that emotion is separate from and can precede cognition. Emotions are complex
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Passion (emotion)
Passion (Greek πασχω[1] and late Latin (Christian theology) pati[2]: "suffer") is a feeling of intense enthusiasm towards or compelling desire for someone or something. Passion can range from eager interest in or admiration for an idea, proposal, or cause; to enthusiastic enjoyment of an interest or activity; to strong attraction, excitement, or emotion towards a person. It is particularly used in the context of romance or sexual desire, though it generally implies a deeper or more encompassing emotion than that implied by the term lust. Denis Diderot
Denis Diderot
describes passions as "penchants, inclinations, desires and aversions carried to a certain degree of intensity, combined with an indistinct sensation of pleasure or pain, occasioned or accompanied by some irregular movement of the blood and animal spirits, are what we call passions
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Romantic Friendship
A romantic friendship or passionate friendship is a very close but typically non-sexual relationship between friends, often involving a degree of physical closeness beyond that which is common in the contemporary Western societies. It may include for example holding hands, cuddling, hugging, kissing, giving massages, and sharing a bed, or co-sleeping, without sexual intercourse or other physical sexual expression. In historical scholarship, the term may be used to describe a very close relationship between people of the same sex during a period of history when homosexuality did not exist as a social category
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Affection
Affection, attraction, infatuation, or fondness is a "disposition or state of mind or body"[1] that is often associated with a feeling or type of love. It has given rise to a number of branches of philosophy and psychology concerning emotion, disease, influence, and state of being.[2] "Affection" is popularly used to denote a feeling or type of love, amounting to more than goodwill or friendship. Writers on ethics generally use the word to refer to distinct states of feeling, both lasting and spasmodic. Some contrast it with passion as being free from the distinctively sensual element.[3] Even a very simple demonstration of affection can have a broad variety of emotional reactions, from embarrassment to disgust to pleasure and annoyance
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Cupid
In classical mythology, Cupid
Cupid
(Latin Cupīdō [kʊˈpiː.doː], meaning "desire") is the god of desire, erotic love, attraction and affection. He is often portrayed as the son of the love goddess Venus and the war god Mars. He is also known in Latin as Amor ("Love"). His Greek counterpart is Eros.[1] Although Eros
Eros
is generally portrayed as a slender winged youth in Classical Greek art, during the Hellenistic period, he was increasingly portrayed as a chubby boy. During this time, his iconography acquired the bow and arrow that represent his source of power: a person, or even a deity, who is shot by Cupid's arrow is filled with uncontrollable desire. In myths, Cupid
Cupid
is a minor character who serves mostly to set the plot in motion. He is a main character only in the tale of Cupid
Cupid
and Psyche, when wounded by his own weapons, he experiences the ordeal of love
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Xenia (Greek)
Xenia (Greek: ξενία, translit. xenía, meaning "guest-friendship") is the ancient Greek concept of hospitality, the generosity and courtesy shown to those who are far from home and/or associates of the person bestowing guest-friendship. The rituals of hospitality created and expressed a reciprocal relationship between guest and host expressed in both material benefits (such as the giving of gifts to each party) as well as non-material ones (such as protection, shelter, favors, or certain normative rights). The Greek god Zeus
Zeus
is sometimes called Zeus
Zeus
Xenios in his role as a protector of guests. He thus embodied the religious obligation to be hospitable to travelers
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Amour De Soi
Amour de soi (French, "love of self") is a concept in the philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
that refers to the kind of self-love that humans share with brute animals and predates the appearance of society. Acts committed out of amour de soi tend to be for individual well-being. They are naturally good and not malicious because amour de soi as self-love does not involve pursuing one's self-interest at the expense of others. The sentiment does not compare oneself with others, but is concerned solely with regarding oneself as an absolute and valuable existence. It is related to an awareness of one's future and can restrain present impulse
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Broken Heart
Broken heart
Broken heart
(also known as a heartbreak or heartache) is a metaphor for the intense emotional—and sometimes physical—stress or pain one feels at experiencing great longing. The concept is cross-cultural, often cited with reference to a desired or lost lover, and dates back at least 3,000 years.[1] Emotional pain that is severe can cause 'broken heart syndrome', including physical damage to the heart.Contents1 Physiology 2 Psychology2.1 Uncomplicated grief 2.2 Depression 2.3 Psychological trauma 2.4 Posttraumatic stress disorder3 Medical complications3.1 Broken heart
Broken heart
syndrome 3.2 Endocrine and immune dysfunction4 Cultural references 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources7.1 Printed 7.2 Online8 External linksPhysiology[edit] The emotional "pain" of a broken heart is believed to be part of the survival instinct
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Loving-kindness
Loving-kindness is a specific kind of love conceptualized in various religious traditions, both among theologians and religious practitioners, as a form of love characterized by acts of kindness.Contents1 Use in Religion1.1 Buddhism 1.2 Hinduism 1.3 Jainism 1.4 Judaism and Christianity2 See also 3 NotesUse in Religion[edit] Buddhism[edit] Main article: Metta Loving-kindness is an English equivalent for the Buddhist term Mettā,[1] as described in the Metta
Metta
Sutta of the Pali
Pali
Canon's Sutta Nipata (Sn 1.8) and Khuddakapatha
Khuddakapatha
(Khp 9), and practiced in Loving kindness meditation.[2] Hinduism[edit] Priti (Sanskrit: प्रीति) means loving kindness in Hindu traditions
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Conjugal Love
If Wiktionary
Wiktionary
has a definition already, change this tag to TWCleanup2 or else consider a soft redirect to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
by replacing the text on this page with Wi
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