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Gribenes
GRIBENES or GRIEVEN (Yiddish : גריבענעס‎, , "scraps") Hebrew : גלדי שומן‎‎) are crisp chicken or goose skin cracklings with fried onions, a kosher food somewhat similar to pork rinds . Gribenes
Gribenes
are a byproduct of schmaltz preparation. A favored food in the past among Ashkenazi Jews
Ashkenazi Jews
, gribenes is frequently mentioned in Jewish stories and parables . CONTENTS * 1 Holiday food * 2 Servings * 3 Etymology * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links HOLIDAY FOODThis food is often associated with the Jewish holidays Hanukkah
Hanukkah
and Rosh Hashanah
Rosh Hashanah
. Traditionally, gribenes were served with potato kugel or latkes during Hannukkah
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Yiddish Language
YIDDISH (ייִדיש, יידיש or אידיש, yidish/idish, lit. "Jewish ", pronounced ; in older sources ייִדיש-טײַטש Yidish-Taitsh, lit. Judaeo-German) is the historical language of the Ashkenazi Jews
Jews
. It originated during the 9th century in Central Europe , providing the nascent Ashkenazi community with an extensive Germanic based vernacular fused with elements taken from Hebrew and Aramaic , as well as from Slavic languages
Slavic languages
and traces of Romance languages . Yiddish
Yiddish
is written with a fully vocalized alphabet based on the Hebrew alphabet . The earliest surviving references date from the 12th century and call the language לשון־אַשכּנז (loshn-ashknaz, "language of Ashkenaz") or טײַטש (taytsh), a variant of tiutsch, the contemporary name for Middle High German
Middle High German

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Jewish Cuisine
JEWISH CUISINE is a diverse collection of cooking traditions of the Jewish people
Jewish people
worldwide. It has evolved over many centuries, shaped by Jewish dietary laws (kashrut ), Jewish Festival , and Shabbat (Sabbath) traditions. Jewish cuisine
Jewish cuisine
is influenced by the economics, agriculture, and culinary traditions of the many countries where Jewish communities have settled and varies widely throughout the whole world. The distinctive styles in Jewish cuisine
Jewish cuisine
are Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
, Sephardi , Mizrahi , Persian , Yemenite , Indian , and Latin-American . There are also dishes from Jewish communities from Ethiopia
Ethiopia
to Central Asia
Central Asia

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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Old High German
OLD HIGH GERMAN (OHG, German : Althochdeutsch, German abbr. Ahd.) is the earliest stage of the German language
German language
, conventionally covering the period from around 700 to 1050. Coherent written texts do not appear until the second half of the 8th century , and some treat the period before 750 as "prehistoric" and date the start of Old High German proper to 750 for this reason. There are, however, a number of Elder Futhark inscriptions dating to the 6th century (notably the Pforzen buckle ), as well as single words and many names found in Latin
Latin
texts predating the 8th century
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography regulated by the Council for German Orthography )
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Jambalaya
JAMBALAYA (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə, ˌdʒʌm-/ JAM-bə-LY-ə , JUM-bə-LY-ə ) is a dish of Louisiana
Louisiana
origin of Spanish and French (especially Provençal ) influence. It consists of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked sausage such as andouille , along with some other meat or seafood, frequently pork, chicken, crawfish, or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a soffritto -like mixture known as the "holy trinity " in Creole and Cajun
Cajun
cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as carrots, tomatoes, chilis, and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings, and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done
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Shrimp
The term SHRIMP is used to refer to some decapod crustaceans , although the exact animals covered can vary. Used broadly, it may cover any of the groups with elongated bodies and a primarily swimming mode of locomotion – most commonly Caridea and Dendrobranchiata . In some fields, however, the term is used more narrowly, and may be restricted to Caridea, to smaller species of either group, or to only the marine species. Under the broader definition, shrimp may be synonymous with prawn , covering stalk-eyed swimming crustaceans with long narrow muscular tails (abdomens ), long whiskers (antennae ), and slender legs. Any small crustacean which resembles a shrimp tends to be called one. They swim forward by paddling with swimmerets on the underside of their abdomens, although their escape response is typically repeated flicks with the tail driving them backwards very quickly
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Challah
CHALLAH ( /xɑːˈlɑː/ , /ˈhɑːlə/ or /ˈkɑːlə/ ; Hebrew : חַלָּה‎‎ Halla ), plural: CHALLOT /xɒloʊt/ or CHALLOS /xɒləs/ ) is a special Jewish
Jewish
bread , usually braided and typically eaten on ceremonial occasions such as Sabbath and major Jewish holidays (other than Passover
Passover
)
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, also known simply as the "PG", is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania , United States. It has won six Pulitzer Prizes since 1938. CONTENTS* 1 Early history * 1.1 Gazette * 1.2 Post * 2 Block-Hearst deal * 3 Joint operating agreement * 4 Strike, consolidation, new competition * 5 Community presence * 6 Financial challenges * 7 Awards * 8 In popular culture * 9 Prices * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 Bibliography and further reading * 13 External links EARLY HISTORY The Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette Building in Downtown Pittsburgh
Downtown Pittsburgh
, which housed the paper from 1962 to 2015. GAZETTEThe Post-Gazette began its history as a four-page weekly called The Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Gazette, first published on July 29, 1786 with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge
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Free Range
FREE RANGE denotes a method of farming husbandry where the animals , for at least part of the day, can roam freely outdoors, rather than being confined in an enclosure for 24 hours each day. On many farms, the outdoors ranging area is fenced, thereby technically making this an enclosure, however, free range systems usually offer the opportunity for extensive locomotion and sunlight prevented by indoor housing systems. Free range
Free range
may apply to meat, eggs or dairy farming. The term is used in two senses that do not overlap completely: as a farmer-centric description of husbandry methods, and as a consumer-centric description of them. There is a diet where the practitioner only eats meat from free-range sources called ethical omnivorism , which is a type of semivegetarian . In ranching , free-range livestock are permitted to roam without being fenced in, as opposed to fenced-in pastures
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Furnished Cages
FURNISHED CAGES, sometimes called ENRICHED or MODIFIED CAGES, are cages for egg laying hens which have been designed to overcome some of the welfare concerns of battery cages whilst retaining their economic and husbandry advantages, and also provide some of the welfare advantages of non-cage systems. Many design features of furnished cages have been incorporated because research in animal welfare science has shown them to be of benefit to the hens
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Yarding
In poultry keeping, YARDING is the practice of providing the poultry with a fenced yard in addition to a poultry house . Movable yarding is a form of managed intensive grazing . Yarding
Yarding
is often confused with free range . The distinction is that free-range poultry are either totally unfenced, or the fence is so distant that it has little influence on their freedom of movement. CONTENTS * 1 Historical practice * 2 Recent practice * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORICAL PRACTICEBefore the discovery of vitamins A and D in the 1920s, green feed and sunshine were essential to the health of poultry. Vitamin D
Vitamin D
was synthesized from sunlight on the skin (as with humans), while Vitamin A was obtained through green forage plants such as grass. Yards small enough to be fenced economically were soon stripped of palatable green forage and become barren
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Battery Cage
BATTERY CAGES are a housing system used for various animal production methods, but primarily for egg-laying hens . The name arises from the arrangement of rows and columns of identical cages connected together, sharing common divider walls, as in the cells of a battery . Although the term is usually applied to poultry farming, similar cage systems are used for other animals. Battery cages have generated controversy between advocates for animal rights , and industrial producers. Battery cages are the predominant form of housing for laying hens worldwide. They reduce aggression and cannibalism among hens , but are barren, restrict movement, prevent many natural behaviours, and increase rates of osteoporosis . As of 2014, approximately 95% of eggs in the U.S. were produced in battery cages
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Poultry
POULTRY (/ˌpoʊltriː/ ) are domesticated birds kept by humans for their eggs , their meat or their feathers . These birds are most typically members of the superorder Galloanserae (fowl) , especially the order Galliformes (which includes chickens , quails and turkeys ). Poultry also includes other birds that are killed for their meat, such as the young of pigeons (known as squabs ) but does not include similar wild birds hunted for sport or food and known as game . The word "poultry" comes from the French/Norman word poule, itself derived from the Latin word pullus, which means small animal. The domestication of poultry took place several thousand years ago. This may have originally been as a result of people hatching and rearing young birds from eggs collected from the wild, but later involved keeping the birds permanently in captivity
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