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Friulian Language
Friulian or Friulan ( furlan (help·info) or, affectionately, marilenghe in Friulian, friulano in Italian, Furlanisch in German, furlanščina in Slovene; also Friulian) is a Romance language belonging to the Rhaeto-Romance family, spoken in the Friuli
Friuli
region of northeastern Italy. Friulian has around 600,000 speakers, the vast majority of whom also speak Italian. It is sometimes called Eastern Ladin since it shares the same roots as Ladin, but, over the centuries, it has diverged under the influence of surrounding languages, including German, Italian, Venetian, and Slovene. Documents in Friulian are attested from the 11th century and poetry and literature date as far back as 1300. By the 20th century, there was a revival of interest in the language that has continued to this day
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Furlan (surname)
Furlan is an Italian surname. Notable people with the surname include:Alan Furlan (1920–1997), American actor Alessio Furlan (born 1976), Italian boxer Angelo Furlan (born 1977), Argentine cyclist Boris Furlan (1894–1957), Slovenian jurist, philosopher of law, translator and politician Bruno Furlan (born 1992), Brazilian footballer Federico Furlan (born 1990), Italian footballer Gabriel Furlán (born 1964), Argentine racing driver Giorgio Furlan (born 1966), Italian cyclist Jean-Marc Furlan (born 1957), French footballer and manager Luis Furlán (born 1948), Guatemalan electrical engineer Mira Furlan (born 1955), Croatian actress and singer Renzo Furlan (born 1970), Italian tennis player Sergio Furlan (born 1940), Italian sailor Brittany Furlan (born 1986), American comedian and internet personalityThis page lists people with the surname Furlan
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Muggia
Muggia (Slovene: Milje, Venetian, Triestine dialect: Muja, German: Mulgs, Friulian: Mugle) is an Italian town and comune in the extreme south-east of the Province of Trieste in the region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia on the border with Slovenia. Lying on the eastern flank of the Gulf of Trieste in the northern Adriatic Sea, Muggia is the only Italian port town in Istria. The town's architecture is marked by its Venetian and Austrian history, and its harbour hosts a modern 500-berth marina for yachts (Porto San Rocco). Muggia lies in northern Istria. Its territory, limited on the sea-side by a shoreline of more than 7 kilometres (4 mi) featuring a coastal road and on the border side by a hill system, Monti di Muggia, including Mt. Castellier, Mt. S. Michele, Mt
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Gospel
Gospel
Gospel
is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".[1] It originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[2][Notes 1] The four gospels of the New Testament
New Testamen

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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Carni
The Carni (Greek Καρνίοι) were a tribe of the Eastern Alps
Eastern Alps
in classical antiquity, settling in the mountains separating Noricum
Noricum
and Venetia (roughly corresponding to the more modern Triveneto).Contents1 History1.1 Roman expansion2 See also 3 References 4 BibliographyHistory[edit] They are usually considered a Gaulish tribe,[1] although some associate them with the Venetic peoples, a group closely related to but probably distinct from the Celts.[2] Their area of settlement isn't known with precision
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Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
Latin
or Sermō Vulgāris ("common speech") was a nonstandard form of Latin
Latin
(as opposed to Classical Latin, the standard and literary version of the language) spoken in the Mediterranean region during and after the classical period of the Roman Empire. It is from Vulgar Latin
Latin
that the Romance languages
Romance languages
developed; the best known are the national languages Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, and French. Works written in Latin
Latin
during classical times and the earlier Middle Ages used Classical Latin
Latin
rather than Vulgar Latin, with very few exceptions (most notably sections of Gaius Petronius' Satyricon). Because of its nonstandard nature, Vulgar Latin
Latin
had no official orthography
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Graziadio Isaia Ascoli
Graziadio Isaia Ascoli
Graziadio Isaia Ascoli
(16 July 1829 – 21 January 1907) was an Italian linguist.[1][2][3][4][5][6]Contents1 Life and work 2 Political views 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Ascoli was born in an Italian-speaking Jewish family in the multiethnic town of Gorizia, then part of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(now in Italy). Already as a boy, he learned some of the other languages traditionally spoken in the town, German, Friulian, Slovene and Venetian. An autodidact, he published his first important work on the languages of the orient in 1854
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Historical Linguistics
Historical linguistics, also called diachronic linguistics, is the scientific study of language change over time.[1] Principal concerns of historical linguistics include:[2]to describe and account for observed changes in particular languages to reconstruct the pre-history of languages and to determine their relatedness, grouping them into language families (comparative linguistics) to develop general theories about how and why language changes to describe the history of speech communities to study the history of words, i.e
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Switzerland
Switzerland
Switzerland
(/ˈswɪtsərlənd/), officially the Swiss Confederation, is a federal republic in Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern
Bern
is the seat of the federal authorities.[1][2][note 1] The country is situated in Western-Central Europe,[note 4] and is bordered by Italy
Italy
to the south, France
France
to the west, Germany
Germany
to the north, and Austria
Austria
and Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
to the east. Switzerland
Switzerland
is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi) (land area 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi))
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Istria
Istria
Istria
(/ˈɪstriə/ IST-ree-ya; Croatian, Slovene: Istra; Istriot: Eîstria; Italian: Istria; German: Istrien), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. The peninsula is located at the head of the Adriatic between the Gulf of Trieste
Gulf of Trieste
and the Kvarner Gulf
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Conservative (language)
In linguistics, a conservative form, variety, or modality is one that has changed relatively little over its history, or which is relatively resistant to change. It is the opposite of innovative or advanced forms or varieties, which have undergone relatively larger or more recent changes. A conservative linguistic form, such as a word, is one that remains closer to an older form from which it evolved, relative to cognate forms from the same source. For example, the Spanish word caro and the French word cher both evolved from the Latin
Latin
word cārum. The Spanish word, which is more similar to the common ancestor, is more conservative than its French cognate.[1] A language or language variety is said to be conservative if it has fewer innovations (in other words, more conservative forms) than related varieties do
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Alps
The Alps
Alps
(/ælps/; French: Alpes [alp]; German: Alpen [ˈalpn̩]; Italian: Alpi [ˈalpi]; Romansh: Alps; Slovene: Alpe [ˈáːlpɛ]) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe,[2][note 1] stretching approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) across eight Alpine countries
Alpine countries
(from west to east): France, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia.[3] The mountains were formed over tens of millions of years as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided. Extreme shortening caused by the event resulted in marine sedimentary rocks rising by thrusting and folding into high mountain peaks such as Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
and the Matterhorn. Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
spans the French–Italian border, and at 4,810 m (15,781 ft) is the highest mountain in the Alps
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Province Of Gorizia
The Province of Gorizia
Gorizia
(Italian: Provincia di Gorizia, Slovene: Goriška pokrajina) was a province in the autonomous Friuli–Venezia Giulia region of Italy, which was disbanded on 30 September 2017.Contents1 Overview 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] Its capital is the city of Gorizia. It belonged to the Province of Udine between 1924 and 1927 and the communes of Sonzia, Plezzo, Bergogna, Caporetto, Tolmino, Circhina, Santa Lucia d'Isonzo, Gracova Serravalle, Canale d'Isonzo, Cal di Canale, Idria, Montenero d'Idria, Castel Dobra, Salona d'Isonzo, Gargaro, Chiapovano, Aidussina, Santa Croce di Aidùssina, Cernizza Goriziana, Tarnova della Selva, Sambasso, Merna, Ranziano, Montespino, Opacchiasella, Temenizza, Rifembergo, Comeno, San Daniele del Carso, Zolla, Vipacco, San Martino di Quisca and San Vito di Vipacco; and the eastern part of Gorizia, were part of this province between 1918 and 1924, and from 1927 to 1947
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Province Of Venice
The Province of Venice (Provincia di Venezia) was a province in the Veneto region of northern Italy. Its capital is the city of Venice. It had an area of 2,467 km², and a total population of 846,962 (2011).[1] The province became the Metropolitan City of Venice in 2015.[when?][citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demography3.1 Comunes4 Economy 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The area was settled by 11th century BC. According to legend, Antenor fled from Troy,[2] leading the people of Eneti from Paphlagonia to inhabit the shores of the Adriatic. In 102 B.C., The Romans defeated the Cimbri and the Germanic tribes in the area, thus increasing their influence in the region to form the Regio X Venetia et Histria. The exact date when Venice was established in unknown, but about 570 refugees from the hinterland, especially from Aquileia, fled to the islands of the Venetian Lagoon in order to escape the frequent barbaric invasions
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