HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Curtiss-Wright
US$ 2.11 billion (FY 2016) [1]Operating incomeUS$ 308 millionNumber of employees8,000 (2017)Website www.curtisswright.comThe Curtiss-Wright
Curtiss-Wright
Corporation is an American-based, global diversified product manufacturer and service provider for the commercial, industrial, defense, and energy markets. Created in 1929 from the consolidation of Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, (founded January 1916 by Glenn Hammond Curtiss) Wright Aeronautical (founded by Glenn L. Martin
Glenn L. Martin
and Orville Wright
Orville Wright
as Wright-Martin), and various supplier companies, by the end of World War II
World War II
it was the largest aircraft manufacturer in the United States, supplying whole aircraft in large numbers to the U.S. Armed Forces
[...More...]

"Curtiss-Wright" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flying Tigers
The First American Volunteer Group
American Volunteer Group
(AVG) of the Chinese Air Force in 1941–1942, nicknamed the Flying Tigers, was composed of pilots from the United States
United States
Army Air Corps (USAAC), Navy (USN), and Marine Corps (USMC), recruited under presidential authority and commanded by Claire Lee Chennault. The shark-faced nose art of the Flying Tigers
Flying Tigers
remains among the most recognizable image of any individual combat aircraft or combat unit of World War II. The group consisted of three fighter squadrons of around 30 aircraft each. It trained in Burma
Burma
before the American entry into World War II with the mission of defending China against Japanese forces. The group of volunteers were officially members of the Chinese Air Force
[...More...]

"Flying Tigers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nuclear Navy
Nuclear navy, or nuclear-powered navy consists of naval ships powered by relatively small onboard nuclear reactors known as naval reactors. The concept was revolutionary for naval warfare when first proposed. Prior to nuclear power, submarines were powered by diesel engines and could only submerge through the use of batteries. In order for these submarines to run their diesel engines and charge their batteries they would have to surface or snorkel. The use of nuclear power allowed these submarines to become true submersibles and unlike their conventional counterparts, they became limited only by crew endurance and supplies.Contents1 Nuclear-powered aircraft
Nuclear-powered aircraft
carriers 2 Nuclear-powered submarines 3 Nuclear-powered cruisers 4 United States
United States
Navy4.1 Admiral Hyman G
[...More...]

"Nuclear Navy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
[...More...]

"List Of Business Entities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States Armed Forces
Gen Joseph Dunford, USMCVice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen Paul J. Selva, USAF Senior Enlisted Advisor
Senior Enlisted Advisor
to the Chairman CSM John W. Troxell, USAManpowerMilitary age 17 with parental consent, 18 for voluntary service
[...More...]

"United States Armed Forces" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Actuator
An actuator is a component of a machine that is responsible for moving and controlling a mechanism or system, for example by opening a valve. In simple terms, it is a "mover". An actuator requires a control signal and a source of energy. The control signal is relatively low energy and may be electric voltage or current, pneumatic or hydraulic pressure, or even human power. Its main energy source may be an electric current, hydraulic fluid pressure, or pneumatic pressure. When it receives a control signal, an actuator responds by converting the signal's energy into mechanical motion. An actuator is the mechanism by which a control system acts upon an environment. The control system can be simple (a fixed mechanical or electronic system), software-based (e.g
[...More...]

"Actuator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aircraft Flight Control System
A conventional fixed-wing aircraft flight control system consists of flight control surfaces, the respective cockpit controls, connecting linkages, and the necessary operating mechanisms to control an aircraft's direction in flight. Aircraft engine controls
Aircraft engine controls
are also considered as flight controls as they change speed. The fundamentals of aircraft controls are explained in flight dynamics. This article centers on the operating mechanisms of the flight controls
[...More...]

"Aircraft Flight Control System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Valve
A valve is a device that regulates, directs or controls the flow of a fluid (gases, liquids, fluidized solids, or slurries) by opening, closing, or partially obstructing various passageways. Valves are technically fittings, but are usually discussed as a separate category. In an open valve, fluid flows in a direction from higher pressure to lower pressure. The word is derived from the Latin valva, the moving part of a door, in turn from volvere, to turn, roll. The simplest, and very ancient, valve is simply a freely hinged flap which drops to obstruct fluid (gas or liquid) flow in one direction, but is pushed open by flow in the opposite direction
[...More...]

"Valve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nuclear Power
2012 World [civil] electricity generation by fuels (IEA, 2014)[4]   Coal/Peat (40.4%)   Natural Gas (22.5%)   Hydro (16.2%)    Nuclear fission
Nuclear fission
(10.9%)   Oil (5.0%)   Others (Renew.) (5.0%) Nuclear power
Nuclear power
is the use of nuclear reactions that release nuclear energy[5] to generate heat, which most frequently is then used in steam turbines to produce electricity in a nuclear power plant. The term includes nuclear fission, nuclear decay and nuclear fusion. Presently, the nuclear fission of elements in the actinide series of the periodic table produce the vast majority of nuclear energy in the direct service of humankind, with nuclear decay processes, primarily in the form of geothermal energy, and radioisotope thermoelectric generators, in niche uses making up the rest
[...More...]

"Nuclear Power" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Petroleum Industry
The petroleum industry, also known as the oil industry or the oil patch, includes the global processes of exploration, extraction, refining, transporting (often by oil tankers and pipelines), and marketing of petroleum products. The largest volume products of the industry are fuel oil and gasoline (petrol). Petroleum
Petroleum
(oil) is also the raw material for many chemical products, including pharmaceuticals, solvents, fertilizers, pesticides, synthetic fragrances, and plastics. The industry is usually divided into three major components: upstream, midstream and downstream. Midstream operations are often included in the downstream category. Petroleum
Petroleum
is vital to many industries, and is of importance to the maintenance of industrial civilization in its current configuration, and thus is a critical concern for many nations
[...More...]

"Petroleum Industry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consolidation (business)
In business, consolidation or amalgamation is the merger and acquisition of many smaller companies into a few much larger ones. In the context of financial accounting, consolidation refers to the aggregation of financial statements of a group company as consolidated financial statements. The taxation term of consolidation refers to the treatment of a group of companies and other entities as one entity for tax purposes. Under the Halsbury's Laws of England, 'amalgamation' is defined as "a blending together of two or more undertakings into one undertaking, the shareholders of each blending company, becoming, substantially, the shareholders of the blended undertakings
[...More...]

"Consolidation (business)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Natural Gas
Natural gas
Natural gas
is a naturally occurring hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly including varying amounts of other higher alkanes, and sometimes a small percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, hydrogen sulfide, or helium.[2] It is formed when layers of decomposing plant and animal matter are exposed to intense heat and pressure under the surface of the Earth over millions of years. The energy that the plants originally obtained from the sun is stored in the form of chemical bonds in the gas.[3] Natural gas
Natural gas
is a fossil fuel used as a source of energy for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as a fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals
[...More...]

"Natural Gas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dayton, Ohio
Dayton (/ˈdeɪtən/) is the sixth-largest city in the state of Ohio and the county seat of Montgomery County.[5] A small part of the city extends into Greene County.[6] In the 2010 census, the population was 141,759, and the Dayton metropolitan area
Dayton metropolitan area
had 799,232 residents, making it Ohio's fourth-largest metropolitan area, after Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Columbus, and the 63rd-largest in the United States.[7] The Dayton-Springfield-Greenville Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,080,044 in 2010, making it the 43rd-largest in the United States.[8] Dayton is within Ohio's
[...More...]

"Dayton, Ohio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Airframe
The airframe of an aircraft is its mechanical structure. It is typically considered to include fuselage, wings and undercarriage and exclude the propulsion system. Airframe
Airframe
design is a field of aerospace engineering that combines aerodynamics, materials technology and manufacturing methods to achieve balances of performance, reliability and cost.[1]Contents1 History1.1 First World War 1.2 Between World wars 1.3 Second World War 1.4 Postwar 1.5 Modern era2 Safety 3 See also 4 Notes and referencesHistory[edit]4 types of Airframe
Airframe
construction 1. Truss with canvas 2. Truss with corrugate plate 3. Monocoque
Monocoque
construction 4
[...More...]

"Airframe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aircraft Engine
An aircraft engine is the component of the propulsion system for an aircraft that generates mechanical power
[...More...]

"Aircraft Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.