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Carus
Carus
Carus
(Latin: Marcus Aurelius
Marcus Aurelius
Carus
Carus
Augustus;[1][2] c. 222[3] – July or August 283) was Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 282 to 283, and was 60 at ascension. During his short reign, Carus
Carus
fought the Germanic tribes and Sarmatians
Sarmatians
along the Danube
Danube
frontier with success. He died while campaigning against the Sassanid Empire, shortly after his forces sacked its capital Ctesiphon
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Joseph Scaliger
Joseph Justus Scaliger
Joseph Justus Scaliger
(/ˈskælədʒər/; 5 August 1540 – 21 January 1609) was a French religious leader and scholar, known for expanding the notion of classical history from Greek and ancient Roman history to include Persian, Babylonian, Jewish and ancient Egyptian history. He spent the last sixteen years of his life in the Netherlands.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 University and travels 1.3 France, Geneva, and France 1.4 Academic output 1.5 The Netherlands 1.6 Scaliger vs. the Jesuits 1.7 Veronese descent2 See also 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] He was born at Agen, the tenth child and third son of Italian scholar Julius Caesar Scaliger
Julius Caesar Scaliger
and Andiette de Roques Lobejac. When he was twelve years old, he was sent with two younger brothers to the College of Guienne in Bordeaux, which was then under the direction of Jean Gelida
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Persian Empire
The Persian Empire
Empire
(Persian: شاهنشاهی ایران‎, translit. Šâhanšâhiye Irân, lit. 'Imperial Iran') is a series of imperial dynasties centered in Persia/ Iran
Iran
since the 6th century BC in the Achaemenid
Achaemenid
era, to the 20th century AD in the Qajar
Qajar
era.Contents1 Achaemenids 2 Parthians and Sasanians 3 Safavids 4 List of the dynasties described as a Persian Empire 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksAchaemenids The first dynasty of the Persian Empire
Empire
was created by Achaemenids, established by Cyrus the Great
Cyrus the Great
in 550 BC with the conquest of Median, Lydian and Babylonian empires.[1] It covered much of the Ancient world and controlled the largest percentage of the earth's population in history when it was conquered by Alexander the Great
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Praetorian Guard
The Praetorian Guard
Praetorian Guard
(Latin: cohortes praetorianae) was an elite unit of the Imperial Roman Army whose members served as personal bodyguards to the Roman emperors. During the era of the Roman Republic, the Praetorians served as a small escort force for high-ranking officials such as senators or provincial governors like Procurators. With the Republic's transition into the Roman Empire, however, the first emperor Augustus
Augustus
founded the Guard as his personal security detail. Although they continued to serve in this capacity for roughly three centuries, the Guard became notable for its intrigue and interference in Roman Politics, to the point of overthrowing emperors and proclaiming their successors
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Sirmium
Sirmium
Sirmium
was a city in the Roman province
Roman province
of Pannonia. First mentioned in the 4th century BC and originally inhabited by Illyrians
Illyrians
and Celts,[1] it was conquered by the Romans in the 1st century BC and subsequently became the capital of the Roman province
Roman province
of Pannonia Inferior. In 294 AD, Sirmium
Sirmium
was proclaimed one of four capitals of the Roman Empire. It was also the capital of the Praetorian prefecture of Illyricum and of Pannonia
Pannonia
Secunda. Sirmium
Sirmium
was located on the Sava river, on the site of modern Sremska Mitrovica
Sremska Mitrovica
in northern Serbia
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Joannes Zonaras
Joannes or John Zonaras (Greek: Ἰωάννης Ζωναρᾶς, Iōánnēs Zōnarâs; fl. 12th century) was a Byzantine chronicler and theologian who lived in Constantinople
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Eutropius (historian)
Flavius Eutropius was an Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman
historian who flourished in the latter half of the 4th century AD. Eutropius held the office of secretary (magister memoriae) at Constantinople, accompanied the Emperor Julian (361–363) on his expedition against the Persians (363), and was alive during the reign of Valens
Valens
(364–378), to whom he dedicates his Breviarium historiae Romanae and where his history ends.[1] Possibly he held higher state offices in later years, becoming Praetorian prefect
Praetorian prefect
for Illyria in 380 and - together with emperor Valentinian II
Valentinian II
- consul in 387
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Caesar (title)
Caesar (English pl. Caesars; Latin
Latin
pl. Caesares) is a title of imperial character. It derives from the cognomen of Julius Caesar, the Roman dictator
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Quadi
The Quadi
Quadi
were a Suebian
Suebian
Germanic tribe who lived approximately in the area of modern Moravia
Moravia
in the time of the Roman Empire. The only known information about the Germanic tribe the Romans called the 'Quadi' comes through reports of the Romans themselves, whose empire had its border on the River Danube
Danube
just to the south of the Quadi. They associated the Quadi
Quadi
with their neighbours the Marcomanni, and described both groups as having entered the region after the Celtic Boii
Boii
had left it deserted
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Aurelius Victor
Sextus Aurelius Victor (c. 320 – c. 390) was a historian and politician of the Roman Empire. Aurelius Victor was the author of a short history of imperial Rome, entitled De Caesaribus and covering the period from Augustus
Augustus
to Constantius II. The work was published in 361
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Thrace
Thrace
Thrace
(/θreɪs/; Modern Greek: Θράκη, Thráke; Bulgarian: Тракия, Trakiya; Turkish: Trakya) is a geographical and historical area in southeast Europe, now split between Bulgaria, Greece
Greece
and Turkey, which is bounded by the Balkan Mountains
Balkan Mountains
to the north, the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the south and the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the east
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Asia Minor
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
is a historical region in West Asia
West Asia
situated within the Tigris– Euphrates
Euphrates
river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran– Iraq
Iraq
borders.[1] The Sumerians and Akkadians
Akkadians
(including Assyrians and Babylonians) dominated Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the beginning of written history (c. 3100 BC) to the fall of Babylon
Babylon
in 539 BC, when it was conquered by the Achaemenid Empire
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Seleucia On The Tigris
Seleucia
Seleucia
(/sɪˈluːʃə/), also known as Seleucia-on-Tigris or Seleucia
Seleucia
on the Tigris, was a major Mesopotamian
Mesopotamian
city of the Seleucid, Parthian, and Sasanian empires. It stood on the west bank of the Tigris River
Tigris River
opposite Ctesiphon, within the present-day Babil Governorate in Iraq.Contents1 Name 2 History2.1 Seleucid Empire 2.2 Sasanian rule3 Archaeology 4 See also 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksName[edit] Seleucia
Seleucia
(Greek: Σελεύκεια, Seleúkeia) is named for Seleucus I Nicator, who enlarged an earlier settlement and made it the capital of his empire around 305 BC
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Tigris
The Tigris
Tigris
(/ˈtaɪɡrɪs/; Sumerian: 𒁇𒄘𒃼 Idigna or Idigina; Akkadian: 𒁇𒄘𒃼 Idiqlat; Arabic: دجلة‎ Dijlah [didʒlah]; Syriac: ܕܹܩܠܵܬ‎ Deqlaṯ; Armenian: Տիգրիս Tigris; Դգլաթ Dglatʿ; Hebrew: Ḥîddeqel חידקל‎, biblical Hiddekel; Turkish: Dicle; Kurdish: Dîcle, Dîjla دیجلە‎) is the eastern member of the two great rivers that define Mesopotamia, the other being the Euphrates
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