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Cardistry
Cardistry
Cardistry
is a name given to the performance art of card flourishing. The term is a portmanteau of "card" and "artistry". Unlike card magic, cardistry is meant to be visually impressive and appear very hard to execute. People who engage in cardistry are colloquially known as "cardists".Contents1 History 2 Cardistry-Con 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit]A Charlier one-handed cutMain article: History of cardistry Conjuring tricks with playing cards became popular around the 19th century. At that time, simple card flourishes—such as the Charlier Cut, Riffle Shuffle and Thumb Fan—were often performed by magicians as a way of demonstrating sleight of hand.[1] Cardistry
Cardistry
is a portmanteau of “card” and “artistry.” It involves the use of hands to create cuts, displays, fans, patterns and sequences through the use of playing cards. Various armspreads, cuts, shuffles and springs can be used
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Performance Art
Performance
Performance
art is a performance presented to an audience within a fine art context, traditionally interdisciplinary. Performance
Performance
may be either scripted or unscripted, random or carefully orchestrated; spontaneous or otherwise carefully planned with or without audience participation. The performance can be live or via media; the performer can be present or absent. It can be any situation that involves four basic elements: time, space, the performer's body, or presence in a medium, and a relationship between performer and audience. Performance art can happen anywhere, in any type of venue or setting and for any length of time
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Wired (magazine)
Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993.[2] Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany. In its earliest colophons, Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan
as its "patron saint." From its beginning, the strongest influence on the magazine's editorial outlook came from techno-utopian cofounder Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
and his associate Kevin Kelly.[3] From 1998 to 2006, Wired magazine
Wired magazine
and Wired News
Wired News
(which publishes at Wired.com) had separate owners
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Dover Publications
Dover Publications, also known as Dover Books, is an American book publisher founded in 1941 by Hayward Cirker and his wife, Blanche. It primarily publishes reissues, books no longer published by their original publishers. These are often, but not always, books in the public domain. The original published editions may be scarce or historically significant. Dover republishes these books, making them available at a significantly reduced cost.Contents1 Classic reprints 2 History 3 Quality 4 References 5 External linksClassic reprints[edit] Dover is well known for its reprints of classic works of literature, classical sheet music and of public-domain images from the 18th and 19th centuries. Dover also publishes an extensive collection of mathematical, scientific and engineering texts
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VHS
The Video
Video
Home System[1][2] (VHS)[3] is a standard for consumer-level analog video recording on tape cassettes. Developed by Victor Company of Japan (JVC) in the early 1970s, it was released in Japan in late 1976 and in the United States in early 1977. From the 1950s, magnetic tape video recording became a major contributor to the television industry, via the first commercialized video tape recorders (VTRs). At that time, the devices were used only in expensive professional environments such as television studios and medical imaging (fluoroscopy). In the 1970s, videotape entered home use, creating the home video industry and changing the economics of the television and movie businesses. The television industry viewed videocassette recorders (VCRs) as having the power to disrupt their business, while television users viewed the VCR as the means to take control of their hobby.[4] In the 1970s and early 1980s, there was a format war in the home video industry
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Los Angeles
Los AngelesCSA Los Angeles-Long BeachMSA Los Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimPueblo September 4, 1781[3]City status May 23, 1835[4]Incorporated April 4, 1850[5]Named for Our Lady, Queen of the AngelsGovernment • Type Mayor-Council-Commission[6] • Body Los Angeles
Los Angeles
City Council • Mayor Eric Garcetti[7] • City Attorney Mike Feuer[7] • City Controller Ron Galperin[7]Area[8] • City in California 502.76 sq m
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Blues Progression
The twelve-bar blues or blues changes is one of the most prominent chord progressions in popular music. The blues progression has a distinctive form in lyrics, phrase, chord structure, and duration. In its basic form, it is predominantly based on the I, IV, and V chords of a key. The blues can be played in any key. Mastery of the blues and rhythm changes are "critical elements for building a jazz repertoire".[1]Contents1 Structure1.1 Variations2 Lyrical patterns 3 Notes 4 References 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksStructure[edit]The most common or standard twelve-bar blues progressions variations, in C. (Benward & Saker, 2003, p. 186)  Play A (help·info),  B (help·info),  C (help·info),  D (help·info), and  E (help·info) as boogie woogie basslines
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Vanity Fair (magazine)
Vanity Fair is a magazine of popular culture, fashion, and current affairs published by Condé Nast
Condé Nast
in the United States. The first version of Vanity Fair was published from 1913 to 1936. The imprint was revived in 1983 and currently includes five international editions of the magazine. The current editor is Radhika Jones.Contents1 History1.1 Dress and Vanity Fair 1.2 Modern revival2 International editions 3 Vanity Fair Oscar Party 4 Bloomberg/Vanity Fair Party 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Dress and Vanity Fair[edit] Main article: Vanity Fair (U.S. magazine 1913–36) Condé Montrose Nast
Condé Montrose Nast
began his empire by purchasing the men's fashion magazine Dress in 1913. He renamed the magazine Dress and Vanity Fair and published four issues in 1913. It continued to thrive into the twenties
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Playing Cards
A playing card is a piece of specially prepared heavy paper, thin cardboard, plastic-coated paper, cotton-paper blend, or thin plastic, marked with distinguishing motifs and used as one of a set for playing card games. Playing cards are typically palm-sized for convenient handling, and were first invented in China
China
during the Tang dynasty.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Persia and Arabia 1.3 Egypt 1.4 Spread across Europe and early design changes 1.5 Later design changes2 Modern deck formats2.1 French suits3 Symbols in Unicode 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 Cited sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit]A Chinese printed playing card dated c
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Riffle Shuffle
Shuffling
Shuffling
is a procedure used to randomize a deck of playing cards to provide an element of chance in card games. Shuffling
Shuffling
is often followed by a cut, to help ensure that the shuffler has not manipulated the outcome.Contents1 Shuffling
Shuffling
techniques1.1 Overhand shuffle 1.2 Riffle 1.3 Hindu shuffle 1.4 Pile shuffle 1.5 Corgi shuffle 1.6 Mongean shuffle 1.7 Weave and Faro shuffles 1.8 Mexican spiral shuffle2 False shuffles 3 Shuffling
Shuffling
machines 4 Randomization4.1 Sufficient number of shuffles 4.2 Research5 Shuffling
Shuffling
algorithms5.1 In online gambling6 See also 7 References7.1 Footnotes8 External links Shuffling
Shuffling
techniques[edit] Overhand shuffle[edit] One of the easiest shuffles to accomplish after a little practice is the overhand shuffle
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19th Century
The 1 9th century
9th century
was a century that began on January 1, 1801
1801
and ended on December 31, 1900. The 1 9th century
9th century
was a period of social change. Slavery
Slavery
was largely abolished, and the Second Industrial Revolution
Second Industrial Revolution
led to massive urbanization. It was marked by the collapse of the Spanish, Napoleonic, Holy Roman and Mughal empires. This paved the way for the growing influence of the British Empire, the Russian Empire, the United States, the German Empire, the French colonial empire and Meiji Japan, with the British boasting unchallenged dominance after 1815. After the defeat of the French Empire and its allies in the Napoleonic Wars, the British and Russian empires expanded greatly, becoming the world's leading powers. The Russian Empire
Russian Empire
expanded in central and far eastern Asia
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Mathemagician
A mathemagician is a mathematician who is also a magician. The name "mathemagician" was probably first applied to Martin Gardner, but has since been used to describe many mathematician/magicians, including Arthur T. Benjamin,[1] Persi Diaconis,[2] and Colm Mulcahy.[3] Diaconis has suggested that the reason so many mathematicians are magicians is that "inventing a magic trick and inventing a theorem are very similar activities."[4] A great number of self-working mentalism tricks rely on mathematical principles. Max Maven
Max Maven
often utilizes this type of magic in his performance. Notable mathemagicians[edit]Arthur T. Benjamin Persi Diaconis Richard Feynman Karl Fulves Martin Gardner Ronald Graham Colm Mulcahy Raymond Smullyan Bernard Meulenbroek[5]References[edit]^ Albers, Donald J. "Art Benjamin - Mathemagician." Math Horizons, November 1998, 14-18. ^ Professor of Magic Mathematics by Don Albers and Persi Diaconis, Math Horizons Vo
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Portmanteau
A portmanteau (/pɔːrtˈmæntoʊ/ ( listen), /ˌpɔːrtmænˈtoʊ/[a][b]) or portmanteau word is a linguistic blend of words,[1] in which parts of multiple words or their phones (sounds) are combined into a new word,[1][2][3] as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog,[2][4] or motel, from motor and hotel.[5] In linguistics, a portmanteau is defined as a single morph that represents two or more morphemes.[6][7][8][9] The definition overlaps with the grammatical term contraction, but contractions are formed from words that would otherwise appear together in sequence, such as do and not to make don't, whereas a portmanteau word is formed by combining two or more existing words that all relate to a singular concept. A portmanteau also differs from a compound, which does not involve the truncation of parts of the stems of the blended words
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Totally Out Of Control
Chris Kenner is an American close-up magician notable for being the executive producer of David Copperfield for more than 20 years. Kenner is also known for his 1992 book Totally Out of Control in which his popular flourish Sybil was first published.[1][2][3][4][5][6] References[edit]^ "72 Hours Inside the Eye-Popping World of Cardistry". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 7 November 2015. ^ "Nerd Central: At Home With Chris Kenner". Las Vegas
Las Vegas
Weekly. Retrieved 7 November 2015. ^ "Chris Kenner: Executive Producer, David Copperfield". Theory11. Retrieved 7 November 2015. ^ "Magician: Chris Kenner - Dan and Dave Archived November 17, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.". Dan and Dave. Retrieved 7 November 2015. ^ "An Interview With Chris Kenner". Bicycle Playing Cards. Retrieved 7 November 2015. ^ "Updated: Copperfield to Settle Labor Dispute"
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