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ICD
The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a globally used diagnostic tool for epidemiology, health management and clinical purposes. The ICD is maintained by the World Health Organization (WHO), which is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations System.[1] The ICD is originally designed as a health care classification system, providing a system of diagnostic codes for classifying diseases, including nuanced classifications of a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or disease. This system is designed to map health conditions to corresponding generic categories together with specific variations, assigning for these a designated code, up to six characters long
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Colin J. Williams
Colin J. Williams (born c. 1941) is a sociologist and retired Professor of Sociology at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis. He served as Research Sociologist at the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research from 1968-1980.[1][2] Williams' work frequently looks at sociological issues affecting gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.[3][4] Williams earned his bachelor's degree from the London School of Economics in 1963 and his master's degree from the University of British Columbia in 1966. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Rutgers University in 1970.
  1. ^ Staff report (June 30, 1989). Sexual revolution didn't happen, study says
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Martin Weinberg
Martin S. Weinberg (born January 23, 1939) is an American sociologist whose work frequently involves human sexuality. His major areas of interest include sociology of the body, sociology of deviance and control, and interpretive sociology.[1] Weinberg earned a bachelor's degree from St. Lawrence University in 1960 and a master's degree in 1961 from University of Massachusetts Amherst. He earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University in 1965. He began his teaching career that year at Northwestern, then worked as assistant professor at Rutgers University from 1965 to 1968. From 1968 to 1980 he served as a senior research sociologist at the Kinsey Institute.[2] During that time he was also faculty in the sociology department as associate professor from 1968 to 1974. He became a full professor in 1974
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Kinsey Report
The Kinsey Reports are two scholarly books on human sexual behavior, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male[1] (1948) and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female[2] (1953), written by Alfred Kinsey, Wardell Pomeroy, Clyde Martin, and (for Sexual Behavior in the Human Female) Paul Gebhard and published by W.B. Saunders. The two best-selling books were immediately controversial, both within the scientific community and the general public, because they challenged conventional beliefs about sexuality and discussed subjects that had previously been taboo.[3] The validity of Kinsey's methods were also called into question
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Martin Duberman
Martin Bauml Duberman (born August 6, 1930) is an American historian, biographer, playwright, and gay rights activist. Duberman is Professor of History Emeritus at Herbert Lehman College in the Bronx, New York City.[1] Duberman was born into a Jewish family. His father, born in Ukraine, was initially a manual laborer but later founded a successful clothing business that sold uniforms to the government during World War II. They used the money to move to Mount Vernon, New York and send Martin to the Horace Mann School, an elite private prep school. Duberman is gay.[2] In 1968, he signed the "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest" pledge to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War
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Paul Gebhard
Paul Henry Gebhard (July 3, 1917 – July 9, 2015) was an American anthropologist and sexologist. Born in Rocky Ford, Colorado, he earned a B.S. and a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1940 and 1947, respectively. Between the years 1946 and 1956, Gebhard was a close colleague to sex researcher Alfred Kinsey.[1] It was acknowledged in Gebhard's New York Times obituary that Kinsey was in fact his mentor and that Gebhard was fascinated when Kinsey first met him and revealed to him that the men's room at Grand Central Terminal in New York City was a frequent site for gay cruising.[2] Following Kinsey's death in 1956,[1] Gebhard became the second director of the Kinsey Institute and served in that capacity from 1956 to 1982
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Female Sexuality
Human female sexuality encompasses a broad range of behaviors and processes, including female sexual identity and sexual behavior, the physiological, psychological, social, cultural, political, and spiritual or religious aspects of sexual activity. Various aspects and dimensions of female sexuality, as a part of human sexuality, have also been addressed by principles of ethics, morality, and theology. In almost any historical era and culture, the arts, including literary and visual arts, as well as popular culture, present a substantial portion of a given society's views on human sexuality, which include both implicit (covert) and explicit (overt) aspects and manifestations of feminine sexuality and behavior. In most societies and legal jurisdictions, there are legal bounds on what sexual behavior is permitted
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Mating
In biology, mating is the pairing of either opposite-sex or hermaphroditic organisms, usually for the purposes of sexual reproduction. Some definitions limit the term to pairing between animals,[1] while other definitions extend the term to mating in plants and fungi. Fertilization is the fusion of two gametes.[2] Copulation is the union of the sex organs of two sexually reproducing animals for insemination and subsequent internal fertilization. Mating may also lead to external fertilization, as seen in amphibians, fishes and plants. For the majority of species, mating is between two individuals of opposite sexes. However, for some hermaphroditic species, copulation is not required because the parent organism is capable of self-fertilization (autogamy); for example, banana slugs. The term mating is also applied to related processes in bacteria, archaea and viruses
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Pan (god)
In ancient Greek religion and mythology, Pan (/pæn/;[1] Ancient Greek: Πάν, romanizedPán) is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds, rustic music and impromptus, and companion of the nymphs.[2] He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. With his homeland in rustic Arcadia, he is also recognized as the god of fields, groves, wooded glens and often affiliated with sex; because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Pan to be the god of theatrical criticism.[3] The word panic ultimately derives from the god's name. In Roman religion and myth, Pan's counterpart was Faunus, a nature god who was the father of Bona Dea, sometimes identified as Fauna; he was also closely associated with Sylvanus, due to their similar relationships with woodlands
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