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Zenith Carburetters
The Zenith Carburetter Company Limited was a British company making carburettors in Stanmore Middlesex founded in 1910.[1] In 1965[2] they joined with their major pre-war rival Solex
Solex
Carburettors and over time the Zenith brand name fell into disuse
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Zenith Carburetor Company
Zenith Carburetor
Carburetor
(later the Fuel Devices Division of Bendix Corporation) was an American manufacturer of gasoline engine management systems and components, chiefly carburetors and filters. It was founded in Detroit, Michigan in 1911.[1] Carburetors in most cases were replaced by fuel injection systems, also provided by Bendix, during the 1970s.Contents1 Francois Baverey 2 Ford 3 Harley-Davidson 4 Farm tractors 5 Other applications 6 Notes 7 External linksFrancois Baverey[edit] The design of the Zenith was perfected around 1906–1908 by Francois Baverey of Lyon, France. The carburettor had two jets, one for rich mixture, one for lean. The mixture was then combined in the right proportions for the engine's speed and load.[2] The Zenith design won first prize in a competition with 14 others organised by the Royal Prussian War Ministry in 1914. Ford[edit] Zenith's product was one of a small number of different carburetors used on the Ford Model T
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Carburetor
A carburetor (American English) or carburettor (British English; see spelling differences) is a device that mixes air and fuel for internal combustion engines in the proper ratio for combustion. It is sometimes colloquially shortened to carb in the UK and North America or carby in Australia.[1] To carburate or carburet (and thus carburation or carburetion, respectively) means to mix the air and fuel or to equip (an engine) with a carburetor for that purpose. Carburetors have largely been supplanted in the automotive and, to a lesser extent, aviation industries by fuel injection
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Dashpot
A dashpot is a mechanical device, a damper which resists motion via viscous friction.[1] The resulting force is proportional to the velocity, but acts in the opposite direction,[2] slowing the motion and absorbing energy. It is commonly used in conjunction with a spring (which acts to resist displacement). The process and instrumentation diagram (P&ID) symbol for a dashpot is .Contents1 Types 2 Applications 3 Viscoelasticity 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTypes[edit] Two common types of dashpots exist - linear and rotary. Linear dashpots are generally specified by stroke (amount of linear displacement) and damping coefficient (force per velocity). Rotary dashpots will have damping coefficients in torque per angular velocity. A less common type of dashpot is an eddy current damper, which uses a large magnet inside a tube constructed of a non-magnetic but conducting material (such as aluminium or copper)
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Throttle
A throttle is the mechanism by which fluid flow is managed by the constriction or obstruction. An engine's power can be increased or decreased by the restriction of inlet gases (by the use of a throttle), but usually decreased. The term throttle has come to refer, informally and incorrectly, to any mechanism by which the power or speed of an engine is regulated, such as a car's accelerator pedal. What is often termed a throttle (in an aviation context) is more correctly called a thrust lever, particularly for jet engine powered aircraft
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Static Pressure
In fluid mechanics the term static pressure has several uses:In the design and operation of aircraft, static pressure is the air pressure in the aircraft’s static pressure system. In fluid dynamics, many authors use the term static pressure in preference to just pressure to avoid ambiguity
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Jet (fluid)
A jet is a stream of fluid that is projected into a surrounding medium, usually from some kind of a nozzle, aperture or orifice.[1] Jets can travel long distances without dissipating. Jet fluid has higher momentum compared to the surrounding fluid medium. In the case that the surrounding medium is assumed to be made up of the same fluid as the jet, and this fluid has a viscosity, the surrounding fluid is carried along with the jet in a process called entrainment. Some animals, notably cephalopods, use a jet to propel themselves in water. See also[edit]Plane counterflow jets Bickley jet Landau–Squire jet Schlichting jet Jet nozzle, how a jet is formed Jet damping, a jet carries away angular momentum from a device emitting it Jet of blood Astrophysical jet Lava fountainReferences[edit]^ "a usually forceful stream of fluid (as water or gas) discharged from a narrow opening or a nozzle." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jetPijush K. Kundu and Ira M
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Cone (geometry)
A cone is a three-dimensional geometric shape that tapers smoothly from a flat base (frequently, though not necessarily, circular) to a point called the apex or vertex. A cone is formed by a set of line segments, half-lines, or lines connecting a common point, the apex, to all of the points on a base that is in a plane that does not contain the apex. Depending on the author, the base may be restricted to be a circle, any one-dimensional quadratic form in the plane, any closed one-dimensional figure, or any of the above plus all the enclosed points. If the enclosed points are included in the base, the cone is a solid object; otherwise it is a two-dimensional object in three-dimensional space
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Piston
A piston is a component of reciprocating engines, reciprocating pumps, gas compressors and pneumatic cylinders, among other similar mechanisms. It is the moving component that is contained by a cylinder and is made gas-tight by piston rings. In an engine, its purpose is to transfer force from expanding gas in the cylinder to the crankshaft via a piston rod and/or connecting rod
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Venturi Pump
An aspirator is a type of ejector-jet pump, which produces vacuum by means of the Venturi effect. In an aspirator, fluid (liquid or gaseous) flows through a tube that first narrows and then expands in cross-sectional area. When the tube narrows, the fluid pressure decreases. In this narrow area the fluid velocity must increase to conserve mass continuity. Where the tube narrows, a vacuum is drawn because of the Venturi effect. Operation[edit] The cheap and simple water aspirator is the most common type of aspirator. It is used in chemistry and biology laboratories and consists of a tee fitting attached to a tap and has a hose barb at one side. The flow of water passes through the straight portion of the tee, which has a restriction at the intersection, where the hose barb is attached. The vacuum hose should be connected to this barb. In the past, water aspirators were common for low-strength vacuums in chemistry benchwork
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SU Carburettor
SU carburettors are a brand of carburettor of the constant depression type. The design remained in quantity production for much of the twentieth century. The S.U. Carburetter Company Limited also manufactured dual-choke updraught carburettors for aero-engines such as the Rolls-Royce Merlin and Rolls-Royce Griffon.[1]Contents1 Invention and development 2 S. U. Company Limited 3 The S. U
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Standard Triumph
The Standard Motor Company Limited was a motor vehicle manufacturer, founded in Coventry, England, in 1903 by Reginald Walter Maudslay. It purchased Triumph in 1945 and in 1959 officially changed its name to Standard-Triumph International and began to put the Triumph brandname on all its products. For many years, it manufactured Ferguson tractors powered by its Vanguard engine. All Standard's tractor assets were sold to Massey-Ferguson in 1959. In September 1959, Standard Motor Company was renamed Standard-Triumph International Limited
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Triumph Motor Company
The Triumph Motor Company
Triumph Motor Company
was a British car and motor manufacturing company in the 19th and 20th centuries. The marque had its origins in 1885 when Siegfried Bettmann
Siegfried Bettmann
of Nuremberg
Nuremberg
formed S. Bettmann & Co and started importing bicycles from Europe and selling them under his own trade name in London. The trade name became "Triumph" the following year, and in 1887 Bettmann was joined by a partner, Moritz Schulte, also from Germany. In 1889, the businessmen started producing their own bicycles in Coventry, England. The company was acquired by Leyland Motors
Leyland Motors
in 1960, ultimately becoming part of the giant conglomerate British Leyland
British Leyland
(BL) in 1968, where the Triumph brand was absorbed into BL's Specialist Division alongside former Leyland stablemate Rover and Jaguar
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Volvo 140
The Volvo 140 Series is a line of mid-size cars manufactured and marketed by Volvo from 1966 to 1974 in two- and four-door sedan (models 142 and 144 respectively) as well as five door station wagon (model 145) body styles—with numerous intermediate facelifts. More than a million Volvo 140s were built. Volvo Cars began manufacturing the Volvo 144 at Torslandaverken in the late summer of 1966[7] for the 1967 model year. The 144 series, which followed the Volvo Amazon (replacing it in its fourth model year), was the first Volvo to use a tri-digit nomenclature, indicating series, number of cylinders and number of doors. Thus, a "144" was a 1st series, 4-cylinder, 4-door sedan. The 144 was the first Volvo to feature a more rectilinear or boxy styling. Compared to the Volvo Amazon, the 140 was a radical departure with minimal exterior and interior carryover, notably a stylised version of the front split grille. The car's basic shape would survive into the 1990s as the 200 series
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Saab 900
The Saab 900
Saab 900
is a compact luxury automobile which was produced by Saab from 1978 until 1998 in two generations. The first generation from 1978 to 1993 is known as the "classic" and the generation from 1994 to 1998 is known as the "new generation". The "classic" Saab 900
Saab 900
was based on the Saab 99
Saab 99
chassis, though with a longer front end to meet U.S. frontal crash regulations
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