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Zenaga Language
Zenaga (autonym: Tuḍḍungiyya) is a Berber language
Berber language
spoken from the town of Mederdra
Mederdra
in southwestern Mauritania
Mauritania
to the Atlantic coast and in Senegal. It shares its basic linguistic structure with other Berber idioms, but specific features are quite different
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Saint-Louis, Senegal
Saint-Louis, or Ndar as it is called in Wolof, is the capital of Senegal's Saint-Louis Region. Located in the northwest of Senegal, near the mouth of the Senegal
Senegal
River, and 320 km north of Senegal's capital city Dakar, it has a population officially estimated at 176,000 in 2005. Saint-Louis was the capital of the French colony of Senegal
Senegal
from 1673 until 1902 and French West Africa
French West Africa
from 1895 until 1902, when the capital was moved to Dakar
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Bear Arms
The right to keep and bear arms (often referred to as the right to bear arms) is the people's right to possess weapons (arms) for their own defense, as described in the philosophical and political writings of Aristotle, Cicero, John Locke, Machiavelli, the English Whigs and others.[1] Inclusion of this right in a written constitution is uncommon. In 1875, 17 percent of constitutions included a right to bear arms, yet, since the early twentieth century, "the proportion has been less than 9 percent and falling".[2] In their historical survey and comparative analysis of constitutions dating back to 1789,[2] Tom Ginsburg
Tom Ginsburg
and colleagues "identified only 15 constitutions (in nine countries) that had ever included an explicit right to bear arms
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Institut Fondamental D'Afrique Noire
IFAN (I.F.A.N., Institut Fondamental d'Afrique Noire or African Institute of Basic research) is a cultural and scientific institute in the nations of the former French West Africa. Founded in Dakar, Senegal
Senegal
in 1938 as the Institut Français d’Afrique Noire (the name was changed only in 1966), it was headquartered in what is now the building of the IFAN Museum of African Arts
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René Basset
René Basset
René Basset
(24 July 1855 – 4 January 1924) was a French orientalist, specialist of Arabic
Arabic
and Berber languages.Contents1 Biography 2 Publications 3 Honours 4 References 5 BibliographyBiography[edit] René Basset
René Basset
was the first director of the "École des lettres d'Alger"[1] created in 1879[1] during the French colonisation of Algeria. A member of the société Asiatique of Paris as well as those of Leipzig and Florence, he collaborated with the Journal Asiatique
Journal Asiatique
and studied Chinese Islam. André Basset and Henri Basset were his sons. Publications[edit]Étude sur la zenatia du Mzab [2] Notes de lexicographie berbère 1887
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University Of Nice Sophia Antipolis
The Nice
Nice
Sophia Antipolis
Sophia Antipolis
University (French: Université Nice
Nice
Sophia Antipolis) is a university located in Nice, France
France
and neighboring areas. It was founded in 1965 and is organized in eight faculties, two autonomous institutes and an engineering school. It also hosts the first WWW Interactive Multipurpose Server (WIMS). It is a member of the Coordination of French Research-Intensive Universities (CURIF), the equivalent of the Russell Group
Russell Group
in the UK.Contents1 History 2 Campus 3 Academics3.1 Units of Formation and Research (U.F.R.) 3.2 Institutes4 Notable alumni 5 References 6 See also 7 External linksHistory[edit]University Center.Château de Valrose.At the heart of the Mediterranean Basin, the Université Nice
Nice
Sophia Antipolis has developed a vivid cosmopolitan spirit
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Ethnologue
Ethnologue: Languages of the World is an annual reference publication in print and online that provides statistics and other information on the living languages of the world. It was first issued in 1951, and is now published annually by SIL International, a U.S.-based, worldwide, Christian non-profit organization
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Loanword
A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation
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Varieties Of Arabic
There are many varieties of Arabic
Arabic
(dialects or otherwise) in existence. Arabic
Arabic
is a Semitic language within the Afroasiatic family that originated on the Arabian Peninsula. It is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form [1]. The largest divisions occur between the spoken languages of different regions. Some varieties of Arabic
Arabic
in North Africa, for example, are incomprehensible to an Arabic
Arabic
speaker from the Levant
Levant
or the Persian Gulf
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Senegal
Coordinates: 14°N 14°W / 14°N 14°W / 14; -14 Republic
Republic
of Senegal République du Sénégal  (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Un Peuple, Un But, Une Foi" (French) "One People, One Goal, One Faith"Anthem:  Pincez Tous vos Koras, Frappez les Balafons Everyone strum your koras, strike the balafonsLocation of  Senegal  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city Dakar 14°40′N 17°25′W / 14.667°N 17.417°W / 14.667; -17.417Official language
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Arabic
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Nomadic
A nomad (Greek: νομάς, nomas, plural tribe) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.[2] Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer, the pastoral nomad owning livestock, or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world.[3] Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method.[citation needed] Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover.[citation needed] Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe, tundra, or ice and sand, where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
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Nouakchott
Nouakchott
Nouakchott
(/nwɑːkˈʃɒt/; French pronunciation: ​[nwakʃɔt]; Arabic: نواكشوط‎ Nuwākshūṭ, originally derived from Berber Nawākšūṭ, "place of the winds")[1] is the capital and largest city of Mauritania. It is one of the largest cities in the Sahara.[2] The city also serves as the administrative and economic centre of Mauritania. Nouakchott
Nouakchott
was a small village of little importance until 1958, when it was chosen as the capital of the nascent nation of Mauritania. It was designed and built to accommodate 15,000 people, but droughts and increasing desertification since the 1970s have displaced a vast number of Mauritanians who resettled in Nouakchott. This caused massive urban growth and overcrowding, with the city having an official population of just under a million as of 2013
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Boutilimit
Boutilimit
Boutilimit
(Arabic: بوتلميت‎) lies 164 km south east of Mauritania's capital of Nouakchott. The town has been an important center of religious scholarship and training since its founding by an Islamic mystic and scholar in the 19th Century. Although desertification has sapped much of the community's economic energy, it remains the most important center of religious training in Mauritania. Its Qur'anic school is known for its library of manuscripts, set up by Shaykh Sidiyya "al-Kabir" (1774–1868), which is second only to the collection found in the ancient Mauritanian city of Chinguetti
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Podor
Coordinates: 16°37′N 15°02′W / 16.617°N 15.033°W / 16.617; -15.033 Podor
Podor
is the northernmost town in Senegal, lying on Morfil Island
Morfil Island
between the Sénégal River
Sénégal River
and Doué River. It was the location of the ancient state Takrur.[1] It is home to a ruined French colonial fort, built in 1854 as a centre for gold trading,[2] and is the birthplace of fashion designer Oumou Sy, and musicians Baaba Maal and Mansour Seck. In the census of 2002 the population of the town was 9,472 inhabitants.[citation needed] In 2007, according to official estimates, it had grown to 11,869. It is 99% Muslim.[3]The old trading post of PodorReferences[edit]^ Gritzner, Janet H. (2005). Senegal. Infobase Publishing. p. 35. ISBN 9781438105390.  ^ Varnava, Andrekos (2015-09-01). Imperial expectations and realities: El Dorados, utopias and dystopias
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