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Zaydi Shi'a
Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
or Zaidism (Arabic: الزيدية‎ az-zaydiyya, adjective form Zaidi or Zaydi) is one of the Shia
Shia
sects closest in terms of theology to Hanafi
Hanafi
Sunni
Sunni
Islam.[1] Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
emerged in the eighth century out of Shi'a
Shi'a
Islam.[2] Zaidis are named after Zayd ibn ʻAlī, the grandson of Husayn ibn ʻAlī and the son of their fourth Imam Ali ibn 'Husain.[2] Followers of the Zaydi Islamic jurisprudence
Islamic jurisprudence
are called Zaydi and make up about 35–42% of Muslims in Yemen, with the vast majority of Shia
Shia
Muslims in the country being Zaydi.[3][4] Zaidis dismiss religious dissimulation (taqiyya).[5] Zaydis were the oldest branch of the Shia
Shia
and are currently the second largest group after Twelvers
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Zaidi (other)
Zaidi may refer to:The Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
sect of Islam or Al-Zaidi, its adherents Al-Zaidi, Arab descendants of Zayd ibn Ali Zaidi Wasitis, people with the surname Zaidi, South Asian descendants of Zayd ibn Ali, from Wasit, Iraq, followers of Twelver or Athnā‘ashariyyah (Ja'fari jurisp
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Hurufism
Hurufism[1] (Arabic: حروفية‎ hurufiyya, adjective form hurufi literal meaning "letters" [of the alphabet]) was a [2] Sufi
Sufi
doctrine, which was born in Astrabad
Astrabad
and spread in areas of western Persia
Persia
and Anatolia
Anatolia
in later 14th – early 15th century.Contents1 Foundation 2 Key elements 3 Impact 4 Contemporary influences 5 See also 6 References 7 External links 8 Further readingFoundation[edit] The founder and spiritual head of the Hurufi movement was Fażlu l-Lāh Astar-Ābādī, also called Nāimī (1340–94). Born in Astrabad, Iran, he was strongly drawn to Sufism
Sufism
and the teachings of Mansur Al-Hallaj
Mansur Al-Hallaj
and Rumi
Rumi
at an early age
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Second Fitna
Yazid I Umar ibn Sa'ad (686) † Marwan I Abd al-Malik Ubayd Allah ibn Ziyad
Ubayd Allah ibn Ziyad
(686) † Husayn ibn Numayr
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Battle Of Karbala
Umayyad military victory Death of Husayn ibn Ali
Husayn ibn Ali
and members of his family and companionsIncident is mourned by Shia
Shia
Muslims to dateBelligerentsThe Umayyads Hu
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Twelver
OthersMourning of Muharram Arba'een
Arba'een
Pilgrimage IntercessionHoly citiesMecca Medina Najaf Karbala Mashhad Jerusalem Samarra Kadhimiya QomGroupsUsuli Akhbari Shaykhi Ni'matullāhī Safaviyya Qizilbash Alevism Alawism Bektashism and folk religion Malamatiyya–QalandariyyaHurufism–Bektashism Rifa'i–GalibiScholarshipLaw Marja' (list) Hawza Ayatollah (list) Allamah   Hujjat al-Islam Ijtihad
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Ja'fari Jurisprudence
OthersMourning of Muharram Arba'een
Arba'een
Pilgrimage IntercessionHoly citiesMecca Medina Najaf Karbala Mashhad Jerusalem Samarra Kadhimiya QomGroupsUsuli Akhbari Shaykhi Ni'matullāhī Safaviyya Qizilbash Alevism Alawism Bektashism and folk religion Malamatiyya–QalandariyyaHurufism–Bektashism Rifa'i–GalibiScholarshipLaw Marja' (list) Hawza Ayatollah (list) Allamah   Hujjat al-Islam Ijtihad
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Batin (Islam)
Bāṭin (Arabic: باطن‎) literally means "inner", "inward", "hidden", etc. The Quran, for instance, has a hidden meaning in contrast to its exterior or apparent meaning, the Zahir. Sufis believe that every individual has a batin in the world of souls. It is the inward self of the individual; when cleansed with the light of one's spiritual guide, it elevates a person spiritually.[1][2] This notion is connected to Allah's attribute of the Hidden One, who cannot be seen but exists in every realm. Muslim groups believe that batin[3] can be fully understood only by a figure with esoteric knowledge
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Alevism
Part of a series on Nizari-Ismāʿīli Batiniyya, Hurufiyya, Kaysanites
Kaysanites
and Twelver
Twelver
Shī‘ismAlevismBeliefsAllah Quran Haqq–Muhammad–Ali Prophet Muḥammad ibn `Abd Allāh Muhammad-Ali Islamic prophet Zahir Ba
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Bektashism And Folk Religion
Part of a series on Nizari-Ismāʿīli Batiniyya, Hurufiyya, Kaysanites
Kaysanites
and Twelver
Twelver
Shī‘ismAlevismBeliefsAllah Quran Haqq–Muhammad–Ali Prophet Muḥammad ibn `Abd Allāh Muhammad-Ali Islamic prophet Zahir Ba
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Ghulat
Ghulāt (Arabic: غلاة‎, lit. 'exaggerators', singular ghālī)[1] is a term used in the theology of Shia Islam
Shia Islam
to describe some minority Muslim groups who either ascribe divine characteristics to figures of Islamic history (usually a member of the Ahl al-Bayt) or hold beliefs deemed deviant by mainstream Shi'i theology. In later periods, this term was used to describe any Shi'i group not accepted by the Zaydis, orthodox Twelvers, and sometimes the Isma'ilis.[2] The usage derives from the idea that the importance or the veneration of such a religious figure has been "exaggerated".Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingHistory[edit] Traditionally, the first of the ghulāt was Abdullah ibn Saba', who may have denied that Ali
Ali
had died and predicting his return (rajʿa), which was considered one form of ghuluww. Some beliefs originally considered deviant have become mainstream
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Alawites
The Alawis, also rendered as Alawites
Alawites
(Arabic: علوية‎ Alawiyyah/Alawīyah), are a syncretic sect of the Twelver
Twelver
branch of Shia Islam, primarily centered in Syria. The eponymously named Alawites
Alawites
revere Ali
Ali
( Ali
Ali
ibn Abi Talib), considered the first Imam of the Twelver
Twelver
school. However, they are generally considered to be Ghulat
Ghulat
by most other sects of Shia Islam.[citation needed] The sect is believed to have been founded by Ibn Nusayr
Ibn Nusayr
during the 9th century, and fully established as a religion
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Qizilbash
OthersMourning of Muharram Arba'een
Arba'een
Pilgrimage IntercessionHoly citiesMecca Medina Najaf Karbala Mashhad Jerusalem Samarra Kadhimiya QomGroupsUsuli Akhbari Shaykhi Ni'matullāhī Safaviyya Qizilbash Alevism Alawism Bektashism and folk religion Malamatiyya–QalandariyyaHurufism–Bektashism Rifa'i–GalibiScholarshipLaw Marja' (list) Hawza Ayatollah (list) Allamah   Hujjat al-Islam Ijtihad
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Umar At Fatimah's House
Umar
Umar
at Fatimah's house refers to the event where Umar
Umar
and his supporters went to the house of Fatimah, the daughter of the prophet Muhammad, in order to get the allegiance of Ali
Ali
and his followers or burn her house down. This event has been recorded in both Shia
Shia
and Sunni
Sunni
books and is said to be the cause of Fatimah's miscarriage of Muhsin ibn Ali, as well as Fatimah's death shortly after.Contents1 Background 2 Event 3 Aftermath3.1 Fatimah's displeasure 3.2 Fatimah's death4 See also 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Main articles: Succession to Muhammad
Muhammad
and The event of Ghadir Khumm A few months prior to his death, the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
gathered all the Muslims who were with him and delivered a long sermon
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Isma'ilism
Ismāʿīlism (Arabic: الإسماعيلية‎ al-Ismāʿīliyya; Persian: اسماعیلیان‎; Sindhi: اسماعيلي‎; Esmāʿīliyān) is a branch of Shia Islam.[1] The Ismāʿīlī (/ˌɪsmeɪˈɪli/[2]) get their name from their acceptance of Imam Isma'il ibn Jafar
Isma'il ibn Jafar
as the appointed spiritual successor (Imām) to Ja'far al-Sadiq, wherein they differ from the Twelvers who accept Musa al-Kadhim, younger brother of Isma'il, as the true Imām.[3] Ismailies b
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Nizari
The Nizaris (Arabic: النزاريون‎ al-Nizāriyyūn) are the largest branch of the Ismaili
Ismaili
Shi'i
Shi'i
Muslims, the second-largest branch of Shia Islam
Shia Islam
(the largest being the Twelver).[1] Nizari
Nizari
teachings emphasize human reasoning (ijtihad, the individual use of one's reason when using both the Quran
Quran
and Hadith
Hadith
as resources), pluralism (the acceptance of racial, ethnic, cultural and intra-religious differences) and social justice
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