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Zaydi
Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
or Zaidism (Arabic: الزيدية‎ az-zaydiyya, adjective form Zaidi or Zaydi) is one of the Shia
Shia
sects closest in terms of theology to Hanafi
Hanafi
Sunni
Sunni
Islam.[1] Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
emerged in the eighth century out of Shi'a
Shi'a
Islam.[2] Zaidis are named after Zayd ibn ʻAlī, the grandson of Husayn ibn ʻAlī and the son of their fourth Imam Ali ibn 'Husain.[2] Followers of the Zaydi Islamic jurisprudence
Islamic jurisprudence
are called Zaydi and make up about 35–42% of Muslims in Yemen, with the vast majority of Shia
Shia
Muslims in the country being Zaydi.[3][4] Zaidis dismiss religious dissimulation (taqiyya).[5] Zaydis were the oldest branch of the Shia
Shia
and are currently the second largest group after Twelvers
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Zaidi (other)
Zaidi may refer to:The Zaidiyyah
Zaidiyyah
sect of Islam or Al-Zaidi, its adherents Al-Zaidi, Arab descendants of Zayd ibn Ali Zaidi Wasitis, people with the surname Zaidi, South Asian descendants of Zayd ibn Ali, from Wasit, Iraq, followers of Twelver or Athnā‘ashariyyah (Ja'fari jurisp
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Mawlid
Mawlid
Mawlid
or Mawlid
Mawlid
al-Nabi al-Sharif (Arabic: مَولِد النَّبِي‎ mawlidu n-nabiyyi, "Birth of the Prophet", sometimes simply called in colloquial Arabic مولد mawl
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Druze
WesternRevelation Divine illumination Divine lightIslamicTa'wil Irfan Nūr Sufism IsmāʿīlīsmEasternJnana Bodhi PrajnaBuddhism HinduismGnostic sectsList of Gnostic sectsSyrian-EgypticSethianismSamaritan Baptist sectsDositheos Simon Magus
Simon Magus
(Simonians) Menander Basilides
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Batiniyya
Batiniyya (Arabic: باطنية‎, translit. Bāṭiniyyah) refers to groups that distinguish between an outer, exoteric (zāhir) and an inner, esoteric (bāṭin) meaning in Islamic scriptures.[1] The term has been used in particular for an allegoristic type of scriptural interpretation developed among some Shia
Shia
groups, stressing the bāṭin meaning of texts.[2] It has been retained by all branches of
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Musta'li
The Musta‘lī (Arabic: مستعلي‎) are a sect of Isma'ilism named for their acceptance of al- Musta'li
Musta'li
as the legitimate nineteenth Fatimid caliph and legitimate successor to his father, al-Mustansir Billah. In contrast, the Nizari—the other living branch of Ismailism, presently led by Aga Khan
Aga Khan
IV—believe the nineteenth caliph was al-Musta'li's elder brother, Nizar
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Taiyabi Ismaili
The Ṭaiyabi Ismailis are the only surviving sect of the Musta’li Ismaili branch of Ismaili Islam. The other Mustaali
Mustaali
branch, Hafizis are extinct. The Taiyabi
Taiyabi
have split into three major branches: Dawoodi, Sulaymani, and Alavi Bohras. The Taiyabi
Taiyabi
originally split from the Fatimid Caliphate-supporting Hafizi
Hafizi
branch by supporting the right of at-Tayyib Abu'l-Qasim to the Imamate.Contents1 History1.1 Da'i Zoeb bin Moosa 1.2 Sulaymani-Dawoodi-Alavi split2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] Upon the death of the twentieth Imam, al-Amir bi-Ahkami'l-Lah (d. AH 526 (1131/1132)), his two-year old child at-Tayyib Abu'l-Qasim (b. AH 524 (1129/1130)) was appointed twenty-first Imam. As he was not in position to run the dawah, Queen Arwa al-Sulayhi, the Da'i al-Mutlaq, acted as his regent
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Nizari
The Nizaris (Arabic: النزاريون‎ al-Nizāriyyūn) are the largest branch of the Ismaili
Ismaili
Shi'i
Shi'i
Muslims, the second-largest branch of Shia Islam
Shia Islam
(the largest being the Twelver).[1] Nizari
Nizari
teachings emphasize human reasoning (ijtihad, the individual use of one's reason when using both the Quran
Quran
and Hadith
Hadith
as resources), pluralism (the acceptance of racial, ethnic, cultural and intra-religious differences) and social justice
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Alawites
The Alawis, also rendered as Alawites
Alawites
(Arabic: علوية‎ Alawiyyah/Alawīyah), are a syncretic sect of the Twelver
Twelver
branch of Shia Islam, primarily centered in Syria. The eponymously named Alawites
Alawites
revere Ali
Ali
( Ali
Ali
ibn Abi Talib), considered the first Imam of the Twelver
Twelver
school. However, they are generally considered to be Ghulat
Ghulat
by most other sects of Shia Islam.[citation needed] The sect is believed to have been founded by Ibn Nusayr
Ibn Nusayr
during the 9th century, and fully established as a religion
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Batin (Islam)
Bāṭin (Arabic: باطن‎) literally means "inner", "inward", "hidden", etc. The Quran, for instance, has a hidden meaning in contrast to its exterior or apparent meaning, the Zahir. Sufis believe that every individual has a batin in the world of souls. It is the inward self of the individual; when cleansed with the light of one's spiritual guide, it elevates a person spiritually.[1][2] This notion is connected to Allah's attribute of the Hidden One, who cannot be seen but exists in every realm. Muslim groups believe that batin[3] can be fully understood only by a figure with esoteric knowledge
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Twelver
OthersMourning of Muharram Arba'een
Arba'een
Pilgrimage IntercessionHoly citiesMecca Medina Najaf Karbala Mashhad Jerusalem Samarra Kadhimiya QomGroupsUsuli Akhbari Shaykhi Ni'matullāhī Safaviyya Qizilbash Alevism Alawism Bektashism and folk religion Malamatiyya–QalandariyyaHurufism–Bektashism Rifa'i–GalibiScholarshipLaw Marja' (list) Hawza Ayatollah (list) Allamah   Hujjat al-Islam Ijtihad
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Umar At Fatimah's House
Umar
Umar
at Fatimah's house refers to the event where Umar
Umar
and his supporters went to the house of Fatimah, the daughter of the prophet Muhammad, in order to get the allegiance of Ali
Ali
and his followers or burn her house down. This event has been recorded in both Shia
Shia
and Sunni
Sunni
books and is said to be the cause of Fatimah's miscarriage of Muhsin ibn Ali, as well as Fatimah's death shortly after.Contents1 Background 2 Event 3 Aftermath3.1 Fatimah's displeasure 3.2 Fatimah's death4 See also 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] Main articles: Succession to Muhammad
Muhammad
and The event of Ghadir Khumm A few months prior to his death, the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
gathered all the Muslims who were with him and delivered a long sermon
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Event Of Mubahala
The Event of Mubahala
Mubahala
was a meeting between the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and a Christian
Christian
delegation from Najran
Najran
(present-day Yemen), in the month of Dhu'l-Hijja, 10 AH (October 631,[1] October 631-2,[2] October 632-3),[3] where Muhammad
Muhammad
invoked a curse attempting to reveal who was lying about their religious differences. The initial effort was to invite the Najrani Christians to Islam and acknowledgement of Muhammad
Muhammad
as a prophet. During religious discussions of similarities and differences, the topic of the divinity of ‘Īsā (Arabic: عِـيْـسَى‎, Jesus) arose.[a][4] The Christians refused to accept Muhammad's teachings about Christ and refused denying their beliefs
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Hadith Of The Two Weighty Things
The Hadith
Hadith
al-Thaqalayn refers to a saying (hadith) about which translates to "the two weighty things." In this hadith Muhammad referred to the Qur'an
Qur'an
and Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
("people of the house", Muhammad's family) as the two weighty things. In the context of this Hadith, Muhammad's family refers to Ali ibn Abi Talib, Fatima bint Muhammad, and their children/descendants. This hadith is accepted by both Shia and Sunni Muslims
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The Event Of Ghadir Khumm
The event of Ghadir Khumm
The event of Ghadir Khumm
( Arabic
Arabic
and Persian: واقعه غدیر خم) is an event that took place in March 632. While returning from the Hajj pilgrimage, the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
gathered all the Muslims who were with him and gave a long sermon
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Eid Al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
(Arabic: عيد الأضحى‎, translit. ʿīd al-aḍḥā, lit. 'Feast of the Sacrifice', [ʕiːd ælˈʔɑdˤħæː]), also called the "Sacrifice Feast", is the second of two Islamic holidays
Islamic holidays
celebrated worldwide each year, and considered the holier of the two. It honors the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son, as an act of obedience to God's command. Before Abraham sacrificed his son, God provided a male goat to sacrifice instead. In commemoration of this, an animal is sacrificed and divided into three parts: one third of the share is given to the poor and needy; another third is given to relatives, friends and neighbors; and the remaining third is retained by the family. In the Islamic lunar calendar, Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
falls on the 10th day of Dhu al-Hijjah
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