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Zabajone
Zabaione
Zabaione
(Italian pronunciation: [dzabaˈjoːne]; written also or zabaglione [dzabaʎˈʎoːne]) is an Italian dessert, or sometimes a beverage, made with egg yolks, sugar, and a sweet wine (usually Moscato d'Asti
Moscato d'Asti
or Marsala wine).[1] Some versions of the recipe incorporate spirits such as cognac. The dessert version is a light custard, whipped to incorporate a large amount of air. Since the 1960s, in restaurants in areas of the United States with large Italian populations, zabaione is usually served with strawberries, blueberries, peaches, etc. in a champagne coupe.[2] In France, it is called sabayon, while its Italian name is zabaione or zabaglione (or zabajone, an archaic spelling). The dessert is popular in Argentina and Uruguay, where it is known as sambayón. It is a popular ice cream flavour in Argentina's ice-cream shops.[3] In Colombia, the name is sabajón
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Dessert
Dessert
Dessert
(/dɪˈzɜːrt/) is a confectionery course that concludes a main meal. The course usually consists of sweet foods, and possibly a beverage such as dessert wine or liqueur, but may include coffee, cheeses, nuts, or other savory items. In some parts of the world, such as much of central and western Africa, and most parts of China, there is no tradition of a dessert course to conclude a meal. The term "dessert" can apply to many confections, such as cakes, tarts, cookies, biscuits, gelatins, pastries, ice creams, pies, puddings, custards, and sweet soups. Fruit
Fruit
is also commonly found in dessert courses because of its naturally occurring sweetness
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Advocaat
Advocaat or advocatenborrel is a traditional Dutch alcoholic beverage made from eggs, sugar, and brandy.[1] The rich and creamy drink has a smooth, custard-like flavor. The typical alcohol content is generally somewhere between 14% and 20% ABV. Its contents may be a blend of egg yolks, aromatic spirits, sugar or honey, brandy, vanilla, and sometimes cream (or evaporated milk). Notable makers of advocaat include Bols, Darna Ovo Liker, DeKuyper (sold under the brand name Warninks), and Verpoorten.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types and uses 3 Related drinks 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Advocaat is the Dutch word for "lawyer". As the name of the drink, it is short for advocatenborrel, or "lawyer's drink", where borrel is Dutch for a small alcoholic beverage consumed slowly during a social gathering
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Chicago Tribune
The Chicago
Chicago
Tribune is a daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois, United States, owned by Tronc, Inc., formerly Tribune Publishing. Founded in 1847, and formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper" (for which WGN radio and television are named), it remains the most-read daily newspaper of the Chicago
Chicago
metropolitan area and the Great Lakes region
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Boston Globe
The Boston
Boston
Globe (sometimes abbreviated as The Globe) is an American daily newspaper founded and based in Boston, Massachusetts, since its creation by Charles H. Taylor in 1872. The newspaper has won a total of 26 Pulitzer Prizes as of 2016, and with a total paid circulation of 245,824 from September 2015 to August 2016,[3] it is the 25th most read newspaper in the United States. The Boston
Boston
Globe is the oldest and largest daily newspaper in Boston.[4] Founded in the later 19th century, the paper was mainly controlled by Irish Catholic
Irish Catholic
interests before being sold to Charles H. Taylor and his family. After being privately held until 1973, it was sold to The New York Times in 1993 for $1.1 billion, making it one of the most expensive print purchases in U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Harold McGee
Harold James McGee (born October 3, 1951) is an American author who writes about the chemistry and history of food science and cooking. He is best known for his seminal book On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen initially published in 1984[2] and revised in 2004.[8][9][10][11]Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Awards and honors 4 References 5 External linksEducation[edit] Harold McGee
Harold McGee
tastes surstromming (Swedish fermented herring) at the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, 2010McGee was educated at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), initially to study astronomy,[3][12] but graduating with a B.S. in Literature
Literature
in 1973. He went on to do a Ph.D
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Rompope
Rompope
Rompope
is an eggnog-like drink made with eggs, milk, and vanilla flavouring. The egg yolks impart a yellow hue to the emulsified beverage. It is a traditional drink known as such in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, Belize
Belize
and particularly in Mexico, where, it is believed to have been originally made in the convents of the city of Puebla, Mexico. The word rompope is a derivation of the word rompon, which is used to describe the Spanish version of eggnog that came to Mexico. The Spanish version utilizes rum as its main ingredient, hence the root of both words rom-pon and rom-pope, but in Central America, Guatemala, Honduras
Honduras
and El Salvador, there is also a similar beverage known as rompopo
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Kogel Mogel
Kogel mogel, gogl-mogl, gogel-mogel, gogol-mogol (Russian: Гоголь-моголь), gogli-mogli, or gogle-mogle (Yiddish: גאָגל-מאָגל‎) is an egg-based homemade dessert popular in Central and Eastern Europe, as well as in Caucasus. It is made from egg yolks, sugar, and flavourings such as honey, vanilla, cocoa or rum, similar to eggnog. In its classic form it is served slightly chilled or at room temperature. Served warm or hot, it is considered a home remedy for sore throats. As a home remedy it could be of Russian or Yiddish origin. Variations include milk, honey and soda.[1][2]Contents1 History and etymology 2 Preparation 3 Uses 4 Cultural references 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory and etymology[edit] Gogle Mogle became known by this name by the 17th-century Jewish communities of Central Europe
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Eierpunsch
Eierpunsch
Eierpunsch
(literally "egg punch") is the German name given to a warm, sweetened alcoholic, egg-based drink similar to egg nog [1]. It is commonly a winter drink and can be found served in the popular Christmas markets of Germany and Austria. Eierpunsch
Eierpunsch
is made with egg yolks, sugar, white wine and vanilla. Sometimes cream or custard can be added. A typical recipe of Eierpunsch
Eierpunsch
with white wine to serve 3-4 persons would be:1 bottle of white wine (750 ml) 4 eggs (or 8 egg yolks) 5 tablespoons of sugar one packet of vanilla sugar (equivalent of 2 tsp. sugar and 1 tsp. vanilla extract) Pinch of cinnamon 4 cloves 250 ml. of strong tea lemon or lemon juicePrepare the 250 ml. of tea and allow to cool. Whisk the 5 tablespoons of sugar into the eggs (or egg yolks) and add a little cold white wine and then beat vigorously
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Eggnog
Eggnog
Eggnog
/ˈɛɡˌnɒɡ/, egg nog or egg-nog, historically also known (when alcoholic beverages are added) as milk punch or egg milk punch,[1][2][3] is a rich, chilled, sweetened, dairy-based beverage. It is traditionally made with milk, cream, sugar, whipped egg whites, and egg yolks (which gives it a frothy texture, and its name). In some contexts, distilled spirits such as brandy, rum, whisky or bourbon are added to the drink. Throughout Canada
Canada
and the United States, eggnog is traditionally consumed over Christmas season every year, from late November until the end of the holiday season. Eggnog
Eggnog
has also gained popularity in Australia.[4][5] A variety called Ponche Crema has been made and consumed in Venezuela
Venezuela
and Trinidad
Trinidad
since the 1900s, also as part of the Christmas season
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Coquito
Coquito is a coconut-based alcoholic beverage traditionally only served in Puerto Rico, similar to eggnog, hence it is sometimes called Puerto Rican eggnog. It is always made with rum, coconut milk, sweet condensed milk, vanilla, cinnamon, and cloves.[1]Contents1 Variations 2 Preparation 3 Festival 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksVariations[edit] Variations of the drink include flavored rum or spiced rum, coconut cream, lemon zest, ice cream, ginger, horchata, chocolate and evaporated milk. These ingredients are not required but are used to make the taste sweeter. Many recipes also include egg yolks. [2] Sometimes Coquito is made with pitorro as its alcohol base
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Amazake
Amazake
Amazake
(甘酒, [amazake]) is a traditional sweet, low- or non-alcohol (depending on recipes) Japanese drink made from fermented rice. Amazake
Amazake
dates from the Kofun period, and it is mentioned in the Nihon Shoki. It is part of the family of traditional Japanese foods made using koji and the koji mold Aspergillus oryzae
Aspergillus oryzae
(麹, kōji) that includes miso, soy sauce, and sake.[1][2] There are several recipes for amazake that have been used for hundreds of years. By a popular recipe, kōji is added to cooled whole grain rice causing enzymes to break down the carbohydrates into simpler unrefined sugars. As the mixture incubates, sweetness develops naturally.[3] By another popular recipe, sake kasu is simply mixed with water, but usually sugar is added. Amazake
Amazake
can be used as a dessert, snack, natural sweetening agent, baby food, salad dressing or smoothie
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ESPRESSO
Espresso
Espresso
(/ɛˈsprɛsoʊ/, Italian: [esˈprɛsso], lit. "expressed" from esprimere, "to express" or "to force out") is coffee brewed by expressing or forcing out a small amount of nearly boiling water under pressure through finely ground coffee beans. Espresso
Espresso
is generally thicker than coffee brewed by other methods, has a higher concentration of suspended and dissolved solids, and has crema on top (a foam with a creamy consistency).[1] As a result of the pressurized brewing process, the flavors and chemicals in a typical cup of espresso are very concentrated
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Northern Italy
Northern Italy
Italy
(Italian: Italia settentrionale or just Nord) is a geographical region in the northern part of Italy.[2] Non-administrative, it consists of eight administrative Regions in northern Italy: Aosta Valley, Piedmont, Liguria, Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, Veneto, Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Friuli-Venezia Giulia
and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol.[3] As of 2014, its population was 27,801,460. Rhaeto-Romance
Rhaeto-Romance
and Gallo-Italic languages
Gallo-Italic languages
are spoken in the region, as opposed to the Italo-Dalmatian languages spoken in the rest of Italy. For statistic purposes, the Istituto Nazionale di Statistica
Istituto Nazionale di Statistica
(ISTAT) uses the terms Northwest Italy
Italy
and Northeast Italy
Italy
for two of Italy's five statistical regions in its reporting
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