HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Yuri Gagarin
Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin
Gagarin
(Russian: Ю́рий Алексе́евич Гага́рин[note 1], IPA: [ˈjʉrʲɪj ɐlʲɪˈksʲejɪvʲɪtɕ ɡɐˈɡarʲɪn]; 9 March 1934 – 27 March 1968) was a Soviet pilot and cosmonaut. He was the first human to journey into outer space when his Vostok spacecraft completed an orbit of the Earth
Earth
on 12 April 1961. Gagarin
Gagarin
became an international celebrity and was awarded many medals and titles, including Hero of the Soviet Union, the nation's highest honour. Vostok 1
Vostok 1
marked his only spaceflight, but he served as backup crew to the Soyuz 1
Soyuz 1
mission (which ended in a fatal crash). Gagarin later became deputy training director of the Cosmonaut
Cosmonaut
Training Centre outside Moscow, which was later named after him
[...More...]

picture info

Lieutenant
A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations. The meaning of lieutenant differs in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces. Lieutenant
Lieutenant
may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it
[...More...]

picture info

Volga River
The Volga (Russian: Во́лга, IPA: [ˈvoɫɡə] ( listen)) is the longest river in Europe. It is also Europe's largest river in terms of discharge and watershed. The river flows through central Russia
Russia
and into the Caspian Sea, and is widely regarded as the national river of Russia. Eleven of the twenty largest cities of Russia, including the capital, Moscow, are located in the Volga's watershed. Some of the largest reservoirs in the world can be found along the Volga
[...More...]

picture info

Bricklayer
A bricklayer, which is related to but different from a mason, is a craftsman who lays bricks to construct brickwork. The terms also refer to personnel who use blocks to construct blockwork walls and other forms of masonry.[1] In British and Australian English, a bricklayer is colloquially known as a "brickie".[2] A stone mason is one who lays any combination of stones, cinder blocks, and bricks in construction of building walls and other works. The main difference between a bricklayer and a true mason is skill level: bricklaying is a part of masonry and considered to be a "lower" form of masonry, whereas stonemasonry is a specialist occupation involved in the cutting and shaping of stones and stonework. Bricklaying may also enjoyed as a hobby. For example, Winston Churchill did bricklaying as a hobby. Bricklayers occasionally enter competitions where both speed and accuracy are judged
[...More...]

picture info

Carpenter
Carpentry
Carpentry
is a skilled trade in which the primary work performed is the cutting, shaping and installation of building materials during the construction of buildings, ships, timber bridges, concrete formwork, etc. Carpenters traditionally worked with natural wood and did the rougher work such as framing, but today many other materials are also used[1] and sometimes the finer trades of cabinetmaking and furniture building are considered carpentry. Carpentry
Carpentry
in the United States
United States
is almost always done by men
[...More...]

picture info

Collective Farm
Collective
Collective
farming and communal farming are various types of "agricultural production in which multiple farmers run their holdings as a joint enterprise."[1] That type of collective is often an agricultural cooperative in which member-owners jointly engage in farming activities. The process by which farmland is aggregated (or forcefully taken) is called collectivization. In some countries (including the Soviet Union, the Eastern Bloc
Eastern Bloc
countries, China, and Vietnam), there have been state-run and cooperative-run variants
[...More...]

picture info

OST-Arbeiter
Ostarbeiter
Ostarbeiter
(German: [ˈʔɔstˌaɐ̯baɪtɐ], lit. "Eastern worker") was a Nazi German
Nazi German
designation for foreign slave workers gathered from occupied Central and Eastern Europe
Central and Eastern Europe
to perform forced labor in Germany during World War II. Deportations of civilians commenced at the beginning of the war and reached unprecedented levels following Operation Barbarossa
Operation Barbarossa
of 1941. The Ostarbeiters were apprehended from the newly formed German districts of Reichskommissariat Ukraine, General Government
General Government
Distrikt Galizien, and Reichskommissariat Ostland which comprised the territories of German occupied Poland
German occupied Poland
as well as formerly Soviet occupied Poland since 1939, and the Soviet Union itself
[...More...]

picture info

Foundry
A foundry is a factory that produces metal castings. Metals are cast into shapes by melting them into a liquid, pouring the metal into a mold, and removing the mold material after the metal has solidified as it cools. The most common metals processed are aluminium and cast iron. However, other metals, such as bronze, brass, steel, magnesium, and zinc, are also used to produce castings in foundries. In this process, parts of desired shapes and sizes can be formed.Contents1 Process1.1 Melting1.1.1 Furnace1.2 Degassing 1.3 Mold making 1.4 Pouring 1.5 Shakeout 1.6 Degating 1.7 Heat treating 1.8 Surface cleaning 1.9 Finishing2 See also 3 References 4 External linksProcess[edit] A Foundryman, pictured by Daniel A. Wehrschmidt
Daniel A

[...More...]

picture info

Orbit
In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved trajectory of an object,[1] such as the trajectory of a planet around a star or a natural satellite around a planet. Normally, orbit refers to a regularly repeating trajectory, although it may also refer to a non-repeating trajectory. To a close approximation, planets and satellites follow elliptic orbits, with the central mass being orbited at a focal point of the ellipse,[2] as described by Kepler's laws of planetary motion. Current understanding of the mechanics of orbital motion is based on Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, which accounts for gravity as due to curvature of spacetime, with orbits following geodesics
[...More...]

Moldmaker
A moldmaker (mouldmaker in British English) or molder is a skilled trades worker who makes molds for use in metalworking and other manufacturing industries.[1] It is sometimes regarded as a variety of the trade of the toolmaker.[2] Moldmakers are generally employed in foundries, where molds are used to cast products from metals such as aluminium and cast iron. Moldmakers may also be employed in the plastics, rubber or ceramics industries. The process of manufacturing molds is now often highly automated. While much of the machining processes involved in mold making use computer-controlled equipment for the actual manufacturing of molds (particularly plastic and rubber injection and transfer). Moldmaking is still a highly skilled trade requiring expertise in manual machining, CNC machining, CNC wire EDM, CNC Ram EDM, surface grinding, hand polishing and more. Because of the high skill and intense labor involved much of the mold making in the US has been outsourced to low wage countries
[...More...]

picture info

Saratov
Saratov
Saratov
(Russian: Сара́тов, IPA: [sɐˈratəf] ( listen)) is a city and the administrative center of Saratov
Saratov
Oblast, Russia, and a major port on the Volga River
Volga River
located upstream (north) of Volgograd. Population: 837,900 (2010 Census);[10] 873,055 (2002 Census);[15] 904,643 (1989 Census).[16]Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 German community3 Administrative and municipal status 4 Geography4.1 Climate5 Economy and infrastructure5.1 Transportation6 Education 7 Culture 8 Demographics 9 Sports 10 Twin towns and sister cities 11 Notable people 12 References12.1 Notes 12.2 Sources13 External linksEtymology[edit] The name Saratov
Saratov
may be derived from the Turkic words Saryk Atov, which mean "hawks' island"
[...More...]

picture info

Tractor
A tractor is an engineering vehicle specifically designed to deliver at a high tractive effort (or torque) at slow speeds, for the purposes of hauling a trailer or machinery used in agriculture or construction. Most commonly, the term is used to describe a farm vehicle that provides the power and traction to mechanize agricultural tasks, especially (and originally) tillage, but nowadays a great variety of tasks
[...More...]

picture info

Biplane
A biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two main wings stacked one above the other. The first powered, controlled aeroplane to fly, the Wright Flyer, used a biplane wing arrangement, as did many aircraft in the early years of aviation. While a biplane wing structure has a structural advantage over a monoplane, it produces more drag than a similar unbraced or cantilever monoplane wing. Improved structural techniques, better materials and the quest for greater speed made the biplane configuration obsolete for most purposes by the late 1930s. Biplanes offer several advantages over conventional cantilever monoplane designs: they permit lighter wing structures, low wing loading and smaller span for a given wing area
[...More...]

picture info

World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & Northern Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion Afghan tribal revolts World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
[...More...]

picture info

Russian Language
Russian (русский язык, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language, which is an official language in the Russian Federation, Belarus, Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and Kyrgyzstan, as well as being widely used throughout Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, the Caucasus and Central Asia.[22][23] It was the de facto language of the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
until its dissolution on 25 December 1991.[24] Although nearly three decades have passed since the breakup of the Soviet Union, Russian is used in official capacity or in public life in all the post-Soviet nation-states, as well as in Israel
Israel
and Mongolia. Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages, one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages, and part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch
[...More...]

picture info

Milkmaid
A milkmaid (or milk maid) was a girl or woman who milked cows.[citation needed] She also used the milk to prepare dairy products such as cream, butter, and cheese. Many large houses employed milkmaids instead of having other staff do the work. The term milkmaid is not the female equivalent of milkman [citation needed] in the sense of one who delivers milk to the consumer; it is the female equivalent of milkman in the sense of cowman.[citation needed]Contents1 "As smooth as a milk maid's skin" 2 Cultural references 3 See also 4 References"As smooth as a milk maid's skin"[edit]A Danish milk maid with shoulder yokeThe expression "as smooth as a milk maid's skin" means exceptionally smooth. This phrase came about as a result of exposure to cowpox, which causes no serious symptoms, but does convey a partial immunity to the disfiguring (and often fatal) disease smallpox. Thus, milkmaids lacked the "pockmarked" complexion common to smallpox survivors
[...More...]