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Yokkaichi, Mie
Yokkaichi (四日市市, Yokkaichi-shi, literally "fourth day market") is a city located in Mie Prefecture, Japan. As of August 2015, the city had an estimated population of 306,107 and a population density of 1,480 persons per km2. The total area was 206.44 square kilometres (79.71 sq mi).Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Neighboring municipalities3 Climate 4 Economy 5 Education 6 Transportation6.1 Railway 6.2 Highway 6.3 Seaports7 Local attractions7.1 Festivals and events8 International relations 9 Noted people from Yokkaichi 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit]Suwa park exchange hallThe area around modern Yokkaichi has been settled since prehistoric times
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Special Cities Of Japan
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Tōkaidō (road)
The Tōkaidō road (東海道) was the most important of the Five Routes of the Edo period
Edo period
in Japan, connecting Kyoto
Kyoto
to Edo
Edo
(modern-day Tokyo). Unlike the inland and less heavily travelled Nakasendō, the Tōkaidō travelled along the sea coast of eastern Honshū, hence the route's name.[2]Contents1 Travelling the Tōkaidō 2 The Tōkaidō in art and literature 3 Ōsaka Kaidō 4 Modern-day Tōkaidō 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTravelling the Tōkaidō[edit] The standard method of travel was by foot, as wheeled carts were almost nonexistent and heavy cargo was usually sent by boat. Members of the higher class, however, travelled by kago. Women were forbidden to travel alone and had to be accompanied by men
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Tokugawa Ieyasu
Illegitimate:Yūki Hideyasu Toku-hime Tokugawa Hidetada Matsudaira Tadayoshi Takeda Nobuyoshi Matsudaira Tadateru Matsudaira Matsuchiyo Matsudaira Senchiyo Tokugawa Yoshinao Tokugawa Yorinobu Tokugawa Yorifusa Furihime Matsuhime IchihimeAmong others...ParentsMatsudaira Hirotada Odai-no-kataThe Tokugawa clan
Tokugawa clan
crest Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
(徳川 家康, January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan
Japan
from the Battle of Sekigahara
Battle of Sekigahara
in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868. Ieyasu seized power in 1600, received appointment as shōgun in 1603, and abdicated from office in 1605, but remained in power until his death in 1616
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Edo
Edo
Edo
(江戸, "bay-entrance" or "estuary"), also romanized as Jedo, Yedo or Yeddo, is the former name of Tokyo.[2] It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan
Japan
from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Magistrate2 Government and administration 3 Geography 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links8.1 HistoricHistory[edit] Main article: Edo
Edo
period From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto
Kyoto
remained the formal capital of the country
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Tokugawa Shogunate
The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) and the Edo
Edo
bakufu (江戸幕府), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868.[1] The head of government was the shōgun,[2] and each was a member of the Tokugawa clan.[3] The Tokugawa shogunate
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Tenryō
The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu (徳川幕府) and the Edo
Edo
bakufu (江戸幕府), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1600 and 1868.[1] The head of government was the shōgun,[2] and each was a member of the Tokugawa clan.[3] The Tokugawa shogunate
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Shōgun
A shōgun (将軍, [ɕoːɡɯɴ] ( listen)) was the military dictator of Japan
Japan
during the period from 1185 to 1868 (with exceptions). In most of this period, the shōguns were the de facto rulers of the country, although nominally they were appointed by the Emperor as a ceremonial formality.[1] The shōguns held almost absolute power over territories through military means
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Daikan
Solar term  Longitude     Term     Calendar  Spring  315°   Lichun    4 – 5 February  330°   Yushui   18–19 February  345°   Jingzhe    5 – 6 March  0°   Chunfen   20–21 March  15°   Qingming    4 – 5 April  30°   Guyu   20–21 April  Summer  45°   Lixia    5 – 6 May  60°   Xiaoman   21–22 May  75°   Mangzhong    5 – 6 June  90°   Xiazhi   21–22 June  105°   Xiaoshu    7 – 8 July  120°   Dashu   22–23 July  Autumn  135°   Liqiu    7 – 8 August  150°   Chushu   23–24 August  165°   Bailu    7 – 8 September  180°  
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Jin'ya
:Not to be confused with the word jinja, which denotes a Shinto shrine.The Takayama Jin'ya
Jin'ya
still stands.During the Edo period
Edo period
of Japanese history, a jin'ya (陣屋) was the administrative headquarters of a small domain or parcel of land held by the Tokugawa shogunate, as well as the residence of the head of the administration, and the associated grain storehouse. While larger domains had castles, certain smaller domains did not, and the jin'ya, much smaller than a castle, housed the administration. Some, such as the Komono Jin'ya
Jin'ya
in Komono, Mie
Komono, Mie
Prefecture, had a watchtower (yagura), mimicking the donjon of a castle. Others had moats or earthen walls, in some cases left over from an earlier castle on the site. Generally, domains assessed at 30,000 koku or less had a jin'ya instead of a castle
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Ansei Great Earthquakes
The Ansei
Ansei
great earthquakes (安政の大地震, Ansei
Ansei
no Dai Jishin) were a series of three major earthquakes that struck Japan
Japan
during the Ansei
Ansei
era (1854–1860).The Ansei
Ansei
Tōkai quake (安政東海地震, Ansei
Ansei
Tōkai Jishin) was an 8.4 magnitude earthquake which struck on December 23, 1854. The epicenter ranged from Suruga Bay
Suruga Bay
to the deep ocean, and struck primarily in the Tōkai region, but destroyed houses as far away as in Edo
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Azuchi–Momoyama Period
The Azuchi–Momoyama period
Azuchi–Momoyama period
(安土桃山時代, Azuchi–Momoyama jidai) is the final phase of the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
(戦国時代, Sengoku jidai) in Japan. These years of political unification led to the establishment of the Tokugawa shogunate. It spans the years from c. 1573 to 1600, during which time Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
and his successor, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, imposed order upon the chaos that had pervaded since the collapse of the Ashikaga shogunate. Although a start date of 1573 is often given, this period in broader terms begins with Nobunaga's entry into Kyoto
Kyoto
in 1568, when he led his army to the imperial capital in order to install Ashikaga Yoshiaki
Ashikaga Yoshiaki
as the 15th – and ultimately final – shōgun of the Ashikaga shogunate
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Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
(明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.[2] The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new Emperor in the Charter Oath
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Meiji Period
The Meiji period
Meiji period
(明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912.[1] This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan
Japan
during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-ou
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