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Yi Ui-min
Yi Ui-min (Hangul: 이의민, Hanja: 李義旼, (died 7 May 1196) was a military general who dominated the Goryeo
Goryeo
government prior to the Mongol
Mongol
Invasions. When his rival, Commander Gyeong Dae-seung, died, Yi Ui-min rose to power in the supreme military council, Jungbang. His tyranny came to and end in 1196 on the 8th day of the 4th lunar month when he was assassinated by General Choe Chung-heon.[1]Contents1 Life1.1 Background 1.2 Military 1.3 Dictator 1.4 Death and family's downfall2 Family 3 In Popular culture 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Background[edit] Yi Ui-min was born of slave status,[2] and his father Yi Seon (이선, 李善) was a salt trader and his mother a temple servant
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Korean Name
A Korean name
Korean name
consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people
Korean people
in both South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. In the Korean language, ireum or seongmyeong usually refers to the family name (seong) and given name (ireum in a narrow sense) together. Traditional Korean family names typically consist of only one syllable. There is no middle name in the English language sense. Many Koreans have their given names made of a generational name syllable and an individually distinct syllable, though this practice is declining in the younger generations. The generational name syllable is shared by siblings in North Korea, and by all members of the same generation of an extended family in South Korea. Married men and women usually keep their full personal names, and children inherit the father's family name. The family names are subdivided into bon-gwan (clans), i.e
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List Of Korean Family Names
This is a list of Korean family names, in Hangul
Hangul
alphabetical order. Note: (S) denotes South Korea. (N) denotes North Korea. The most common Korean family name (particularly in South Korea) is Kim, followed by Lee and Park. These three family names are held by around half of the ethnic Korean population
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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KBS1
KBS1
KBS1
is the premier channel of the Korean Broadcasting System, previously known as KBS Television/KBS Channel 9 until the launch of KBS2
KBS2
in 1980, is the oldest TV channel in South Korea
South Korea
and was the successor to HLKZ-TV (or Daehan Bangsong), Korea's first TV channel. It is also the only commercial-free free-to-air television channel in the country
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Kisaeng
Kisaeng
Kisaeng
(Hangul: 기생; Hanja: 妓生; RR: gisaeng), sometimes called ginyeo (Hangul: 기녀; Hanja: 妓女), were artists who worked to entertain others, such as the yangbans and kings. They were also courtesans, providing sexual services.[1][2] First appearing in Goryeo, kisaeng were government's legal entertainers, required to perform various functions for the state. Many were employed at court, but they were also spread throughout the country. They were carefully trained and frequently accomplished in the fine arts, poetry, and prose, although their talents were often ignored due to their inferior social status. Aside from entertainment, these roles included medical care and needlework. Kisaengs play an important role in Korean conceptions of the traditional culture of the Joseon. Some of Korea's oldest and most popular stories, such as Chunhyangjeon, feature kisaeng as heroines
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Gaegyeong
Kaesong
Kaesong
or Gaeseong[a] (Korean pronunciation: [kɛ.sʌŋ]) is a city in North Hwanghae Province
North Hwanghae Province
in the southern part of North Korea, a former Directly Governed City, and the capital of Korea
Korea
during the Taebong
Taebong
kingdom and subsequent Goryeo
Goryeo
dynasty. The city is near the Kaesong Industrial Region
Kaesong Industrial Region
close to the border with South Korea
Korea
and contains the remains of the Manwoldae
Manwoldae
palace. Called Songdo while it was the ancient capital of Goryeo, the city prospered as a trade centre that produced Korean ginseng. Kaesong
Kaesong
now functions as the DPRK's light industry centre. During the Japanese occupation from 1910 to 1945, the city was known by the Japanese pronunciation of its name, "Kaijō"
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Gyeongju
Gyeongju
Gyeongju
(Korean: 경주, pronounced [kjʌŋ.dʑu]), historically known as "Seorabeol" (Korean: 서라벌, pronounced [sʌ.ɾa.bʌl]), is a coastal city in the far southeastern corner of North Gyeongsang Province
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Geoje
Geoje
Geoje
(Korean pronunciation: [kʌ.dʑe̞]) is a city located in South Gyeongsang
South Gyeongsang
province, just off the coast of the port city of Busan, South Korea. Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (former Daewoo Shipyard) in Okpo and Samsung Heavy Industries
Samsung Heavy Industries
(SHI) in Gohyeon are both located on Geoje
Geoje
Island. The city also offers a wide range of tourist sights. The city is made up of a number of islands, of which by far the largest is Geoje
Geoje
Island
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Jeong Jung-bu
Jeong Jung-bu (1106 – 18 October 1179) was a medieval Korean soldier and military dictator during the Goryeo
Goryeo
Dynasty (918–1392). He was a career soldier, qualified on military part of civil service examination. He was most noted for leading a coup d'état in 1170 (Revolt of military officers), dethroning the king and beginning of 100-year military reign in Korea.Contents1 Early career 2 Coup 3 Post coup 4 See alsoEarly career[edit] Jeong was born in 1106; he learned martial arts and military tactics in his early days. He was often reported to be 7-foot-tall giant with great confidence and intelligence. He was a diligent soldier, and his loyalty earned him the trust from the king. He went through a slow promotion and later became Chief of General Staff. At the time he became a soldier, the Goryeo
Goryeo
Dynasty had a policy that put the civilian power over military
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Uijong Of Goryeo
Uijong (23 May 1127 – 7 November 1173) (r. 1146–1170) was the 18th monarch of the Goryeo
Goryeo
dynasty of Korea. He honored his advisors with many ceremonies but hated the warriors, often forcing them to participate in martial arts competitions for the entertainment of himself and the civil officials, as well as assigning them petty portions during land distributions. He also was often drunk, further angering the warriors. Finally, in the autumn of 1170, after constant discriminations, the rage of the military officials burst
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Subak
Subak is either a specific or generic ancient Korean martial art. Historically this term may have specified the old Korean martial art of taekkyeon, but it is unsure. History[edit] Originally, Korea
Korea
was divided into three kingdoms: Silla
Silla
in the southeastern part of the country, Goguryeo
Goguryeo
(Koguryo) in the northern part, and Baekje
Baekje
located west of Silla. In the 18th century, even the king practiced Subak, as the text Dongsa-gangmok (동사강목) from this time suggests:The king himself went and watched a match of Subak (왕이 상춘전에 나가 수박희를 구경하였다)It was a style that utilizes hand strikes, kicks, jointlocks, and throws
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Mongol
The Mongols
Mongols
(Mongolian: Монголчууд, ᠮᠣᠩᠭᠣᠯᠴᠤᠳ, Mongolchuud, [ˈmɔŋ.ɡɔɮ.t͡ʃʊːt]) are an East-Central Asian ethnic group native to Mongolia
Mongolia
and China's Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
Autonomous Region. They also live as minorities in other regions of China
China
(e.g. Xinjiang), as well as in Russia. Mongolian people belonging to the Buryat and Kalmyk subgroups live predominantly in the Russian federal subjects of Buryatia
Buryatia
and Kalmykia. The Mongols
Mongols
are bound together by a common heritage and ethnic identity. Their indigenous dialects are collectively known as the Mongolian language
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McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
romanization (/məˈkuːn ˈraɪʃaʊ.ər/) is one of the two most widely used Korean language
Korean language
romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
was the official romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
is still used as the official system in North Korea.[citation needed] The system was created in 1937 by George M. McCune and Edwin O. Reischauer
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Revised Romanization Of Korean
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
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