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Yawara
The yawara (also called pasak or dulodulo in Filipino martial arts) is a Japanese weapon used in various martial arts. The Yawara
Yawara
originated from the use of Kongou, a Buddhist symbolic object, by monks in Feudal Japan. The Yawara
Yawara
takes the form of one or two small, thick sticks that protrude about an inch from each side of the hand. They are usually used in pairs to initiate throws, bone breaks, and pressure point strikes. The yawara stick was popularized for police officers in the 1940s by Frank A. Matsuyama who made his own version in 1937 or earlier.[1]Contents1 Yawarajutsu 2 Legality 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 ReferencesYawarajutsu[edit] Yawarajutsu is a martial art focusing on use of the yawara. It is sometimes referred to as yawara, and this name has been used interchangeably with jujutsu. There are similarities in the kanji for yawara (柔) and jujutsu (柔術)
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Tantojutsu
Tantōjutsu (短刀術) is a Japanese term for a variety of traditional Japanese knife fighting systems that used the tantō, a short knife or dagger. Historically, many women used a version of the tantõ, called the kaiken, for self-defense, but the onna-bugeisha, or warrior women who were part of the samurai class, learned one of the tantojutsu arts to fight in battle. Martial arts that practise tantojutsu[edit] Tantō with blunt wooden or plastic blades are used to practice martial arts. Metal blades can be used in more advanced training and in demonstrations. Modern styles that use tantō:Aikido Shorinji KempoKoryū bujutsu schools:Kashima Shin-ryū (this ryūha uses term Kaikenjutsu)See also[edit]Kaiken (dagger) WakizashiThis article related to a term from martial arts is a stub
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Iron Fan
A Japanese war fan is a fan designed for use in warfare. Several types of war fans were used by the samurai class of feudal Japan and each had a different look and purpose.Contents1 Description 2 Types of Japanese war fans 3 War fans in history and folklore 4 In popular culture 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 SourcesDescription[edit] War fans varied in size, materials, shape, and use. One of the most significant uses was as a signalling device.[1] Signalling fans came in two varieties:a real fan that has wood or metal ribs with lacquered paper attached to the ribs and a metal outer cover a solid open fan made from metal and/or wood, very similar to the gunbai used today by sumo referees.[2]The commander would raise or lower his fan and point in different ways to issue commands to the soldiers, which would then be passed on by other forms of visible and audible signalling.[3] War fans could also be used as weapons
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Hanbo
The hanbō (半棒, "half-staff") is a staff used in martial arts.[1] Traditionally, the hanbō was approximately three shaku or about 90 centimetres (35 in) long,[1] half the length of the usual staff, the rokushakubō ("six shaku staff"). Diameter was 2.4 to 3 centimetres (0.94 to 1.18 in).[2] However, depending on the school the length and diameter varied.[2] As with any weapon, bearers would often find one best suited to their build, opting often for one that comes up to about waist/hip height.[citation needed]Contents1 Usage 2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingUsage[edit] Hanbōjutsu, the art of wielding the hanbō, is a focus in several martial arts including the Kukishin-ryū
Kukishin-ryū
koryū classical school of martial arts, and Kukishinden-ryū, one of the nine schools of Bujinkan
Bujinkan
Budo Taijutsu. Part of the importance in using this length is that it is approximately that of a walking cane
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Arnis Sticks
Arnis, also known as Kali or Eskrima, is the national sport and martial art of the Philippines. The three are roughly interchangeable umbrella terms for the traditional martial arts of the Philippines ("Filipino Martial Arts", or FMA) that emphasize weapon-based fighting with sticks, knives, bladed weapons, and various improvised weapons as well as "open hand" or techniques without weapons. It is also known as Estoque (Spanish for rapier), Estocada (Spanish for thrust or stab) and Garrote (Spanish for club). In Luzon it may go by the name of Arnis de Mano. The indigenous martial art that the Spanish encountered in 1610 was not yet called "Eskrima" at that time
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J. T. Edson
John Thomas Edson (17 February 1928 – 17 July 2014) was an English author of 137 Westerns, escapism adventure, and police-procedural novels. He lived near Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire from the 1950s onwards, and retired from writing due to ill-health in 2005.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Later life 3 His style 4 Regular characters4.1 Dusty Fog 4.2 Mark Counter 4.3 The Ysabel Kid 4.4 Waco 4.5 Doc Leroy 4.6 Red Blaze 4.7 Ole Devil Hardin 4.8 Tommy Okasi 4.9 Calamity Jane 4.10 Betty Hardin5 Female fight fetish 6 Inconsistencies 7 1980s 8 1990s 9 Controversies 10 ReferencesBiography[edit] He was born in February 1928 near the border of the County of Derbyshire, England, in a small mining village, Whitwell, where his relatives still live.[2] Both his grandfathers and assorted uncles were coalminers[3] His paternal family was native to Whitwell, his paternal grandfather Herbert Edson, being born in the hamlet of Steetley, near Whitwell
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Prevention Of Crime Act 1953
The Prevention of Crime Act 1953
Prevention of Crime Act 1953
(C.14) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom that restricts the carrying of offensive weapons in public. The Act was passed in response to the large rise in violent crime in the United Kingdom, with 800 cases of armed robbery, assault with intent to rob or robbery with violence and 4,445 cases of malicious wounding in 1951 (the last year up to that point with such statistics) while many of these crimes did not include the use of weapons there were calls from politicians, police officers and members of the public for new laws to combat the problem by restricting civilian weapons
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Filipino Martial Arts
Filipino martial arts
Filipino martial arts
(FMA) (Filipino: Sining sa pagtatanggol) refer to ancient Indianized and newer fighting methods devised in the Philippines. It incorporates elements from both Western and Eastern Martial Arts, the most popular forms of which are known as Arnis, Eskrima and Kali. The intrinsic need for self-preservation was the genesis of these systems. Throughout the ages, invaders and evolving local conflict imposed new dynamics for combat in the islands now making up the Philippines. The Filipino people developed battle skills as a direct result of an appreciation of their ever-changing circumstances. They learned often out of necessity how to prioritize, allocate and use common resources in combative situations. Filipinos have been heavily influenced by a phenomenon of cultural and linguistic mixture
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Jodo
Jōdō (杖道:じょうどう), meaning "the way of the jō", or jōjutsu (杖術:じょうじゅつ) is a Japanese martial art using a short staff called jō. The art is similar to bōjutsu, and is strongly focused upon defense against the Japanese sword. The jō is a short staff, usually about 3 to 5 feet (0.9 to 1.5 m) long.Contents1 Legendary origins of Jōjutsu 2 Modern practice 3 List of martial arts that include Jodo/Jojutsu 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLegendary origins of Jōjutsu[edit] Shintō Musō-ryū jōjutsu (sometimes known as Shinto Muso-ryu jōdo - "Shindo" is also a valid pronunciation for the leading character), is reputed to have been invented by the great swordsman Musō Gonnosuke Katsuyoshi (夢想 權之助 勝吉, fl. c.1605, date of death unknown) about 400 years ago, after a bout won by the famous Miyamoto Musashi (宮本 武蔵, 1584–1645)
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Tessen
A Japanese war fan
Japanese war fan
is a fan designed for use in warfare. Several types of war fans were used by the samurai class of feudal Japan and each had a different look and purpose.Contents1 Description 2 Types of Japanese war fans 3 War
War
fans in history and folklore 4 In popular culture 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 SourcesDescription[edit] War
War
fans varied in size, materials, shape, and use
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Kanji
Kanji
Kanji
(漢字; [kandʑi]  listen) are the adopted logographic Chinese characters
Chinese characters
that are used in the Japanese writing system.[1] They are used alongside hiragana and katakana
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Pressure Point
A pressure point (Chinese: 穴位; Japanese: kyūsho 急所 "vital point, tender spot";[1] Sinhala: නිල/මර්ම ස්ථාන Nila/Marma Sthana (in Angampora); Telugu: మర్మ స్థానం Marma Sthanam; Malayalam: മര്‍മ്മം marmam; Tamil: வர்மம் varmam) derives from the meridian points in Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese Medicine
and Indian Ayurv
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Throw (grappling)
A throw, in martial arts, is a grappling technique that involves off-balancing or lifting an opponent, and throwing them to the ground, in Japanese martial arts
Japanese martial arts
referred to as nage-waza, 投げ技, "throwing technique". Throws usually involve a rotating motion, the practitioner performing the throw disconnects with the opponent, and ends balanced and on their feet as opposed to a takedown where both finish on the ground. Throws can however also be followed into a top position, in which case the person executing the throw does not disengage from the opponent
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Vajra
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:Deity yogaDream yogaDeath yogaNgöndro Guru
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Martial Art
Martial arts
Martial arts
are codified systems and traditions of combat practices, which are practiced for a number of reasons: as self-defense, military and law enforcement applications, mental and spiritual development; as well as entertainment and the preservation of a nation's intangible cultural heritage. Although the term martial art has become associated with the fighting arts of eastern Asia, it originally referred to the combat systems of Europe
Europe
as early as the 1550s
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