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Yangshao Culture
The Yangshao culture
Yangshao culture
was a Neolithic
Neolithic
culture that existed extensively along the Yellow River
Yellow River
in China. It is dated from around 5000 BC to 3000 BC. The culture is named after Yangshao, the first excavated representative village of this culture, which was discovered in 1921 in Henan
Henan
Province by the Swedish geologist Johan Gunnar Andersson (1874–1960). The culture flourished mainly in the provinces of Henan, Shaanxi
Shaanxi
and Shanxi.Contents1 Economy1.1 Subsistence 1.2 Crafts2 Houses 3 Social structure 4 Archaeological sites 5 Phases 6 Artifacts 7 See also 8 ReferencesEconomy[edit] Subsistence[edit] The main food of the Yangshao people was millet, with some sites using foxtail millet and others broom-corn millet, though some evidence of rice has been found
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Loess Plateau
The Loess
Loess
Plateau, also known as the Huangtu Plateau, is a 640,000 km2 (250,000 sq mi) plateau located around the Wei River
Wei River
valley and the southern half of the Ordos Loop
Ordos Loop
of the Yellow River in central China. It covers almost all of the provinces of Shaanxi
Shaanxi
and Shanxi
Shanxi
and extends into parts of Gansu, Ningxia, and Inner Mongolia. It was enormously important to Chinese history, as it formed one of the early cradle of Chinese civilization and its eroded silt is responsible for the great fertility of the North China
China
Plain, along with the repeated and massively destructive floods of the Yellow River. Its soil has been called "most highly erodible... on earth"[1] and conservation efforts and land management are a major focus of modern Chinese agriculture
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Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
is a Chinese city and the provincial capital of Henan Province in Central China.[2] It is one of the Chinese Eight Central Cities, which also serves as the political, economic, technological, and educational center of the province, as well as a major transportation hub of China
China
(highway, railway, aviation, communication)[3]. The Great Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
Metropolitan Area (including Zhengzhou, Kaifeng) is the kernel of Chinese Central Plains Economic Region [4][5]. Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
is a Chinese National Civilized City [6], the State-list Famous Historical and Culture City[7], one of the Eight Ancient Capital Cities, one of the significant birthplace of Chinese Civilization[8], birthplace of the Yellow Emperor[9]. Historically, Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
was the capital of China
China
for thousand years (five times)[10]
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Sheep
The sheep ( Ovis
Ovis
aries) is a quadrupedal, ruminant mammal typically kept as livestock. Like most ruminants, sheep are members of the order Artiodactyla, the even-toed ungulates. Although the name "sheep" applies to many species in the genus Ovis, in everyday usage it almost always refers to Ovis
Ovis
aries. Numbering a little over one billion, domestic sheep are also the most numerous species of sheep. An adult female sheep is referred to as a ewe (/juː/), an intact male as a ram or occasionally a tup, a castrated male as a wether, and a younger sheep as a lamb. Sheep
Sheep
are most likely descended from the wild mouflon of Europe and Asia. One of the earliest animals to be domesticated for agricultural purposes, sheep are raised for fleece, meat (lamb, hogget or mutton) and milk. A sheep's wool is the most widely used animal fiber, and is usually harvested by shearing
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Goat
Capra hircusThe domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of goat domesticated from the wild goat of southwest Asia and Eastern Europe. The goat is a member of the family Bovidae
Bovidae
and is closely related to the sheep as both are in the goat-antelope subfamily Caprinae. There are over 300 distinct breeds of goat.[1] Goats are one of the oldest domesticated species, and have been used for their milk, meat, hair, and skins over much of the world.[2] In 2011, there were more than 924 million live goats around the globe, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.[3] Female goats are referred to as "does" or "nannies", intact males are called "bucks" or "billies" and juveniles of both sexes are called "kids". Castrated males are called "wethers"
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Sericulture
Sericulture, or silk farming, is the cultivation of silkworms to produce silk. Although there are several commercial species of silkworms, Bombyx mori
Bombyx mori
(the caterpillar of the domesticated silk moth) is the most widely used and intensively studied silkworm. Silk
Silk
was believed to have first been produced in China
China
as early as the Neolithic
Neolithic
period. Sericulture
Sericulture
has become an important cottage industry in countries such as Brazil, China, France, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, and Russia
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Pottery
Pottery
Pottery
is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares,[1] of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery (plural "potteries"). The definition of pottery used by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is "all fired ceramic wares that contain clay when formed, except technical, structural, and refractory products."[2] Pottery
Pottery
is one of the oldest human inventions, originating before the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, with ceramic objects like the Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Venus of Dolní Věstonice
Venus of Dolní Věstonice
figurine discovered in the Czech Republic date back to 29,000–25,000 BC,[3] and pottery vessels that were discovered in Jiangxi, China, which date back to 18,000 BC
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Pit-house
A pit-house (or pithouse) is a building that is partly dug into the ground, and covered by a roof.[1] Besides providing shelter from extremes of weather, these structures may also be used to store food and for cultural activities like the telling of stories, dancing, singing and celebrations. General dictionaries also describe a pithouse as a dugout[2] and has similarities to a half-dugout.[3] In archaeology, pit-houses are frequently termed a sunken featured building (SFB)[4][5] and occasionally (grub-)hut[6] or grubhouse after the German name Grubenhaus[7] and are found in numerous cultures around the world
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Xi'an
Xi'an
Xi'an
is the capital of Shaanxi
Shaanxi
Province, People's Republic of China. It is a sub-provincial city located in the center of the Guanzhong Plain in Northwestern China.[3] One of the oldest cities in China,
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Wei River
The Wei River
Wei River
(Chinese: 渭河; pinyin: Wèi Hé; Wade–Giles: Wei Ho) is a major river in west-central China's Gansu
Gansu
and Shaanxi provinces. It is the largest tributary of the Yellow River
Yellow River
and very important in the early development of Chinese civilization.[1] The source of the Wei River
Wei River
is close to Weiyuan County – Wei yuan meaning "Wei's source" – in Gansu
Gansu
province, less than 200 kilometres (120 mi) from the Yellow River
Yellow River
at Lanzhou. However, due to the sharp turn north the Yellow River
Yellow River
takes in Lanzhou, the Wei and the Yellow River
Yellow River
do not meet for more than 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) further along the Yellow River's course
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Ding (vessel)
Ding (鼎) were prehistoric and ancient Chinese cauldrons, standing upon legs with a lid and two facing handles. They are one of the most important shapes used in Chinese ritual bronzes. They were made in two shapes: round vessels with three legs and rectangular ones with four, the latter often called fanding. They were used for cooking, storage, and ritual offerings to the gods or to ancestors
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Pig
A pig is any of the animals in the genus Sus, within the even-toed ungulate family Suidae. Pigs include the domestic pig and its ancestor, the common Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), along with other species. Related creatures outside the genus include the peccary, the babirusa, and the warthog. Pigs, like all suids, are native to the Eurasian and African continents
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Prehistoric Beifudi Site
Beifudi
Beifudi
(Chinese: 北福地) is an archaeological site and Neolithic village in Yi County, Hebei, China.[1] The site, an area of 3 ha on the northern bank of the Yishui River, contains artifacts of a culture contemporaneous with the Cishan and Xinglongwa cultures of about 7000–8000 BP,[1] two known Neolithic
Neolithic
cultures east of the Taihang Mountains, and thus fills an archaeological gap between the two Northern Chinese cultures
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Qiu Xigui
Qiu Xigui (Chinese: 裘锡圭; Wade–Giles: Ch'iu Hsi-kuei; born 13 July 1935) is a Chinese historian, palaeographer, and professor of Fudan University. His book Chinese Writing is considered the "single most influential study of Chinese palaeography".[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Qiu Xigui was born in July 1935 in Shanghai
Shanghai
of Ningbo
Ningbo
ancestry. In 1952 he was admitted to the history department of Fudan University, and was interested in pre- Qin dynasty
Qin dynasty
Chinese history
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