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Yamaha YMF288
YM2608, a.k.a. OPNA, is a sixteen-channel sound chip developed by Yamaha. It's a member of Yamaha's OPN family of FM synthesis chips, and the successor to the YM2203. It was notably used in NEC's PC-8801/PC-9801 series computers. The YM2608 comprises four internal modules:FM Sound Source, a six-channel FM synthesis sound system, based on the YM2203 SSG Sound Source, a complete internal implementation of the Yamaha YM2149/SSG, a variant of the popular AY-3-8910/PSG for producing three channels of square wave synthesis. ADPCM Sound Source, a single channel for samples in 8-bit ADPCM format at a sampling rate between 2–16 kHz Rhythm Sound Source, a six-channel ADPCM system, enabling playback of six percussion "rhythm tones" from a built-in ROMThe FM Sound Source module includes six concurrent FM channels (voices, twice as many as the Yamaha YM2203), four operators per channel, with dual interrupt timers and an LFO
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Yamaha YM2608
YM2608, a.k.a. OPNA, is a sixteen-channel sound chip developed by Yamaha. It's a member of Yamaha's OPN family of FM synthesis chips, and the successor to the YM2203. It was notably used in NEC's PC-8801/PC-9801 series computers. The YM2608 comprises four internal modules:FM Sound Source, a six-channel FM synthesis sound system, based on the YM2203 SSG Sound Source, a complete internal implementation of the Yamaha YM2149/SSG, a variant of the popular AY-3-8910/PSG for producing three channels of square wave synthesis. ADPCM Sound Source, a single channel for samples in 8-bit ADPCM format at a sampling rate between 2–16 kHz Rhythm Sound Source, a six-channel ADPCM system, enabling playback of six percussion "rhythm tones" from a built-in ROMThe FM Sound Source module includes six concurrent FM channels (voices, twice as many as the Yamaha YM2203), four operators per channel, with dual interrupt timers and an LFO
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Yamaha YM2154
The Yamaha YM2154, also known as RYP4 (Rhythm Processor), is an audio microchip that was produced by the Yamaha Corporation. It been used for keyboards and drum machines. It has twelve individual samples and also a ADPCM Rompler and a ten channel Analog-to-digital converter.[1] Products[edit] The chip was used in (1985) for the Porta Tone PSR-60, PSR-70[1] and PSR-80.[2] It was also used in the RX-11 and RX-15 drum machines.[3] References[edit]^ a b "Undocumented Sound Chips 2154". Retrieved 20 August 2015.  ^ "EEVblog #256 – Yamaha PSR-80 Keyboard Teardown". EEVBlog. Retrieved 26 February 2014.  ^ "uts". rx15. kyouichisato.blogspot.co.uk
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Yamaha Y8950
The Yamaha
Yamaha
Y8950 is a sound chip, produced in 1984
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Yamaha YM3812
The Yamaha YM3812, also known as the OPL2, is a sound chip created by Yamaha Corporation
Yamaha Corporation
in 1985 and famous for its wide use in IBM PC-based sound cards such as the AdLib, Sound Blaster
Sound Blaster
and Pro AudioSpectrum (8bit),[1] as well as several arcade games by Nichibutsu, Toaplan and others.Contents1 Overview 2 Internal operation 3 Synthesizers 4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] It is backwards compatible with the Yamaha YM3526, to which it is very similar – in fact, it only adds 3 new waveforms. An upgraded version of the OPL2, the Yamaha YMF262
Yamaha YMF262
(OPL3), was also popular in later sound cards such as the Sound Blaster
Sound Blaster
16
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Yamaha YMF262
The Yamaha
Yamaha
YMF262, also known as the OPL3 (OPL is an acronym for FM Operator Type-L), is an FM synthesis sound chip released by Yamaha Corporation in 1988. It is an improved version of the Yamaha
Yamaha
YM3812 (OPL2)
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Yamaha YMF278
The Yamaha YMF278B, also known as the OPL4 (OPL is an acronym for FM Operator Type-L), is a sound chip that incorporates both FM synthesis and sample-based synthesis (often incorrectly called "wavetable synthesis").Contents1 Sample-based synthesis component 2 Frequency modulation synthesis
Frequency modulation synthesis
component 3 Applications 4 Connectivity 5 References 6 External links Sample-based synthesis component[edit] The sample synthesis part is based on pulse-code modulation (PCM). It features:Up to 24 simultaneous sounds (voices) Output sampling frequency of 44.1 kHz (it can also accept 22.05-kHz samples – they are up-sampled to 44.1 kHz before output) Waveform data lengths of 8, 12, or 16 bits Stereo output (with a 4-bit/16-level pan for each voice)The PCM synthesizer part accepts:Up to 4 MB of external memory for wave data Up to 512 samples External ROM or SRAM memory
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Yamaha YM2151
The Yamaha YM2151, also known as OPM (FM Operator Type-M) is an eight-channel, four-operator sound chip. It was Yamaha's first single-chip FM synthesis
FM synthesis
implementation, being created originally for some of the Yamaha DX series of keyboards (DX21, DX27, and DX100[1]). Yamaha also used it in some of their budget-priced electric pianos, such as the YPR-7, -8, and -9. It was used in many arcade game system boards, starting with Atari's Marble Madness
Marble Madness
in 1984, then Sega arcade system boards from 1985, and then arcade games from Konami, Capcom, Data East, and Namco, as well as Williams pinball machines, with its heaviest use in the mid-to-late 1980s. It was also used in Sharp's X1 and X68000
X68000
home computers.[2] Finally, the chip was used in the Yamaha SFG-01 and SFG-05 FM Sound Synthesizer units
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Yamaha YM2164
The Yamaha YM2164
Yamaha YM2164
a.k.a.OPP (FM Operator Type P), is an FM synthesis sound chip developed by Yamaha, an enhanced version of their YM2151 a.k.a. OPM
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Yamaha YM2414
The YM2414, a.k.a. OPZ, is an eight-channel sound chip developed by Yamaha. It was used in many mid-market phase/frequency modulation-based synthesizers, including Yamaha's TX81Z (the first product to feature it, and was named after), DX11, YS200 family, the Korg Z3 guitar synthesizer, and many other devices. A successor was released as the upgraded OPZII/YM2424, used only in the Yamaha V50. The OPZ has the following features:Eight concurrent FM channels Four operators per channel Eight selectable waveforms Fixed-frequency mode, which can go much lower in the OPZII, enabling 0 Hz carriers or low rates for native chorusing Dual low frequency oscillatorsContents1 Products 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksProducts[edit] The chip was used in the PortaTone PSR-80 and PSR-6300.[1] See also[edit]List of Yamaha productsReferences[edit]^ "EEVblog #256 – Yamaha PSR-80 Keyboard Teardown"
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Yamaha YM3526
The YM3526, a.k.a. OPL (FM Operator Type-L), is a sound chip developed by Yamaha as a low-cost nine channel, two operator FM synthesis chip. It was notably used in a Commodore 64
Commodore 64
expansion, the Sound Expander, as well as several arcade games, such as Terra Cresta
Terra Cresta
and Bubble Bobble. A very closely related chip is the Y8950, or MSX-AUDIO, which was used as an MSX
MSX
expansion
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Yamaha YMF292
The YMF292, aka SCSP (Saturn Custom Sound Processor) is a multi-function sound chip developed by Yamaha for the Sega
Sega
Saturn, and was also used in Sega's arcade version of the Saturn, the ST-V, along with the Model 2 and Model 3. For sound generation, the SCSP contains 32 sound generators which can function in either FM synthesis or PCM digital audio mode. The sound generation hardware is then fed into the FH-1 128-step sound effects Digital Signal Processor, which includes 16 sound effect presets. Finally each audio channel is mixed together, with fully configurable channel combining for various levels of FM generation complexity. This allowed the channels to modulate each other, in practice four generators were connected at a time but all 32 generators could be combined into one channel if desired
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Yamaha YMF7xx
There have been various families of Yamaha audio controllers labelled as YMF7xx.Contents1 OPL3-SA families 2 DS-XG family2.1 Models3 AC-XG family 4 References 5 External links5.1 OPL series 5.2 DS-XG series 5.3 AC-XG seriesOPL3-SA families[edit]YMF701 (OPL3-SA): Incorporates OPL3
OPL3
and OPL3-L features, 16-bit stereo CODEC, MPU-401-compatible MIDI
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Yamaha YMZ280B
The Yamaha YMZ280B, also known as PCMD8 is a sound chip that was produced by the Yamaha Corporation. It is an eight-channel PCM/ADPCM sample-based synthesizer designed for use with gaming machines, packaged in a 64-pin QFP. Features[edit]Up to 8 simultaneous sounds (voices) Waveform data lengths of 4 (ADPCM), 8, 16 bits (PCM) Stereo output (with a 4-bit/16-level pan for each voice) Up to 16 MB of external memory for wave data External ROM or SRAM memory.The YMZ280B can either use an internal crystal oscillator running at 16.9344 MHz or be connected to a master clock line. The chip can be connected to up to 16 MB of external memory to provide the voice data for sound reproduction. The sound data can be encoded as 4-bit ADPCM, 8-bit PCM, or 16-bit PCM, played back in a wide range of frequencies (up to 256 steps), and then mixed together and output as a two's complement MSB-first digital data stream meant to be connected to a complementing DAC chip like the YAC513
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Digital Signal Processor
A digital signal processor (DSP) is a specialized microprocessor (or a SIP block), with its architecture optimized for the operational needs of digital signal processing.[1][2] The goal of DSPs is usually to measure, filter or compress continuous real-world analog signals
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Yamaha DSP-1
The Yamaha DSP-1 is a processor of early home theater surround sound equipment, produced in 1985. The DSP-1 (referred to by Yamaha as a Digital Soundfield Processor) allowed owners to synthesize up to 6-channels of surround sound from 2 channel stereo sound via a complex digital signal processor (DSP). Much like today's home theater receivers the DSP-1 offered sixteen "sound fields" created through the DSP including a jazz club, a cathedral, a concert hall, and a stadium. However, unlike today's integrated amps and receivers, these soundfield modes were highly editable, allowing the owner to customize the effect to his or her own personal taste. The DSP-1 also included an analog Dolby Surround
Dolby Surround
decoder as well as other effects such as real-time echo and pitch change. Most of the DSP-1's controls are on the unit's remote control
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