HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Xerox Character Code Standard
Character(s) may refer to:Contents1 Arts, entertainment, and media1.1 Literature 1.2 Music 1.3 Types of entities 1.4 Other arts, entertainment, and media2 Mathematics and science 3 Morality and social science 4 Symbols 5 Other uses 6 See alsoArts, entertainment, and media[edit] Literature[edit] Character
Character
(novel), a 1936 Dutch novel by Ferdinand Bordewijk Characters (Theophrastus), a classical Greek set of character sketches attributed to TheophrastusMusic[edit]Characters (John Abercrombie album), 1977
[...More...]

picture info

Character (novel)
Character (original Dutch title Karakter) is a novel by Dutch author Ferdinand Bordewijk
Ferdinand Bordewijk
published in 1936. Subtitled "Een roman van zoon en vader", "a novel of son and father", it is a Bildungsroman[1] that traces the relationship between a stern father and his son. Character is Bordewijk's best-known novel, and the basis for a 1997 film of the same name. References[edit]^ Maier, Henk M. J. (2004). "Escape from the Green and Gloss of Java: Hella S. Haasse and Indies Literature". Indonesia. 77: 79–107. JSTOR 3351420. This article about a Bildungsroman of the 1930s is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee guidelines for writing about novels
[...More...]

Character Structure
A character structure is a system of secondary traits that are manifested in the specific ways that an individual relates and reacts to others, to various kinds of stimuli, and to the environment. A child whose nurture and/or education cause them to have conflict between legitimate feelings, living in a illogical environment and interacting with adults who do not take the long-term interests of the child to heart will be more likely to form these secondary traits. In this manner the child blocks the unwanted emotional reaction that would have normally occurred. Although this may serve the child well while in that dysfunctional environment, it may also cause the child to react in inappropriate ways, by developing alternate ways in which the energy compulsively surfaces, ways damaging to his or her own interests, when interacting with people in a completely independent environment
[...More...]

Character Theory
In mathematics, more specifically in group theory, the character of a group representation is a function on the group that associates to each group element the trace of the corresponding matrix. The character carries the essential information about the representation in a more condensed form. Georg Frobenius initially developed representation theory of finite groups entirely based on the characters, and without any explicit matrix realization of representations themselves. This is possible because a complex representation of a finite group is determined (up to isomorphism) by its character. The situation with representations over a field of positive characteristic, so-called "modular representations", is more delicate, but Richard Brauer
Richard Brauer
developed a powerful theory of characters in this case as well
[...More...]

Group Representation
In the mathematical field of representation theory, group representations describe abstract groups in terms of linear transformations of vector spaces; in particular, they can be used to represent group elements as matrices so that the group operation can be represented by matrix multiplication. Representations of groups are important because they allow many group-theoretic problems to be reduced to problems in linear algebra, which is well understood. They are also important in physics because, for example, they describe how the symmetry group of a physical system affects the solutions of equations describing that system. The term representation of a group is also used in a more general sense to mean any "description" of a group as a group of transformations of some mathematical object. More formally, a "representation" means a homomorphism from the group to the automorphism group of an object. If the object is a vector space we have a linear representation
[...More...]

Dirichlet Character
In number theory, Dirichlet characters are certain arithmetic functions which arise from completely multiplicative characters on the units of Z / k Z displaystyle mathbb Z /kmathbb Z . Dirichlet characters are used to define Dirichlet L-functions, which are meromorphic functions with a variety of interesting analytic properties. If χ displaystyle chi is a Dirichlet character, one defines its Dirichlet L-series by L ( s , χ ) = ∑ n = 1 ∞ χ ( n ) n s displaystyle L(s,chi )=sum _ n=1 ^ infty frac chi (n) n^ s where s is a complex number with real part > 1
[...More...]

picture info

Number Theory
Number
Number
theory, or in older usage arithmetic, is a branch of pure mathematics devoted primarily to the study of the integers. It is sometimes called "The Queen of Mathematics" because of its foundational place in the discipline.[1] Number
Number
theorists study prime numbers as well as the properties of objects made out of integers (e.g., rational numbers) or defined as generalizations of the integers (e.g., algebraic integers). Integers can be considered either in themselves or as solutions to equations (Diophantine geometry). Questions in number theory are often best understood through the study of analytical objects (e.g., the Riemann zeta function) that encode properties of the integers, primes or other number-theoretic objects in some fashion (analytic number theory)
[...More...]

Multiplicative Character
A multiplicative character (or linear character, or simply character) on a group G is a group homomorphism from G to the multiplicative group of a field (Artin 1966), usually the field of complex numbers. If G is any group, then the set Ch(G) of these morphisms forms an abelian group under pointwise multiplication. This group is referred to as the character group of G. Sometimes only unitary characters are considered (thus the image is in the unit circle); other such homomorphisms are then called quasi-characters. Dirichlet characters can be seen as a special case of this definition. Multiplicative characters are linearly independent, i.e
[...More...]

Character Education
Character education is an umbrella term loosely used to describe the teaching of children in a manner that will help them develop variously as moral, civic, good, mannered, behaved, non-bullying, healthy, critical, successful, traditional, compliant or socially acceptable beings. Concepts that now and in the past have fallen under this term include social and emotional learning, moral reasoning and cognitive development, life skills education, health education, violence prevention, critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and conflict resolution and mediation.[1] Many of these are now considered failed programs, i.e. "religious education", "moral education", "values clarification".[2] Today, there are dozens of character education programs in, and vying for adoption by, schools and businesses.[3] Some are commercial, some non-profit and many are uniquely devised by states, districts and schools, themselves
[...More...]

picture info

Moral Character
Moral character
Moral character
or character is an evaluation of an individual's stable moral qualities. The concept of character can imply a variety of attributes including the existence or lack of virtues such as empathy, courage, fortitude, honesty, and loyalty, or of good behaviors or habits. Moral character
Moral character
primarily refers to the assemblage of qualities that distinguish one individual from another—although on a cultural level, the set of moral behaviors to which a social group adheres can be said to unite and define it culturally as distinct from others
[...More...]

picture info

Group (mathematics)
In mathematics, a group is an algebraic structure consisting of a set of elements equipped with an operation that combines any two elements to form a third element and that satisfies four conditions called the group axioms, namely closure, associativity, identity and invertibility. One of the most familiar examples of a group is the set of integers together with the addition operation, but the abstract formalization of the group axioms, detached as it is from the concrete nature of any particular group and its operation, applies much more widely. It allows entities with highly diverse mathematical origins in abstract algebra and beyond to be handled in a flexible way while retaining their essential structural aspects. The ubiquity of groups in numerous areas within and outside mathematics makes them a central organizing principle of contemporary mathematics.[1][2] Groups share a fundamental kinship with the notion of symmetry
[...More...]

Character (symbol)
A character is a sign or symbol.Contents1 History 2 Grapheme 3 Esotericism and magic 4 Semiotics and epistemology 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Greek χαρακτήρ is a nomen agentis of the verb χαράσσω (charassō) with a meaning "to sharpen, to whet", and also "to make cake",[1] from a PIE root *g'ʰer- "cut" also continued in Irish gearr and English gash, which is perhaps an early loan ultimately from the same Greek root.[2] A χαρακτήρ is thus an "engraver", originally in the sense of a craftsman, but then also used for a tool used for engraving, and for a stamp for minting coins. From the stamp, the meaning was extended to the stamp impression, Plato
Plato
using the noun in the sense of "engraved mark". In Plutarch, the word could refer to a figure or letter, Lucian uses it of hieroglyphs as opposed to Greek grammata (Herm
[...More...]

Character (computing)
In computer and machine-based telecommunications terminology, a character is a unit of information that roughly corresponds to a grapheme, grapheme-like unit, or symbol, such as in an alphabet or syllabary in the written form of a natural language.[1] Examples of characters include letters, numerical digits, common punctuation marks (such as "." or "-"), and whitespace. The concept also includes control characters, which do not correspond to symbols in a particular natural language, but rather to other bits of information used to process text in one or more languages
[...More...]

picture info

Chinese Character
Chinese characters
Chinese characters
are logograms primarily used in the writing of Chinese and Japanese. Occasionally, they are also used for writing Korean, Vietnamese and some other Asian languages. In Standard Chinese, they are called Hanzi (simplified Chinese: 汉字; traditional Chinese: 漢字, lit "Han characters").[2][3][4] They have been adapted to write a number of other Asian languages, including Korean, where they are known as Hanja
Hanja
(漢字), Japanese, where they are known as Kanji
Kanji
(漢字), Vietnamese, in a system known as Chữ Nôm, and Zhuang, in a system known as Sawndip. Collectively, they are known as CJK characters
[...More...]

Character (income Tax)
Character is the type of income to calculate the taxpayer's tax liability. In the United States, the Supreme Court decided ( Commissioner v. Glenshaw Glass Co.) that income is an accession to wealth, however capital gain is of different character from ordinary income. Ordinary income
Ordinary income
includes earned wage income and interest income from lending.Contents1 Capital Income1.1 U.S.2 Ordinary Income2.1 U.S.3 See alsoCapital Income[edit] U.S.[edit] The IRS characterizes income or loss as a capital gain or loss depending on how the taxpayer generates the gain or loss. When the taxpayer invests in real estate or security and then later sells that piece of real estate or security, the IRS characterizes the amount that exceeds the purchase price as capital income while the amount that falls short of the purchase price is capital loss
[...More...]

Sacramental Character
According to Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
teaching, a sacramental character is an indelible spiritual mark (the meaning of the word character in Latin) imprinted by three of the seven sacraments: Baptism, Confirmation, and Holy Orders.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksDescription[edit] This teaching is expressed as follows in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1121:[1]“ The three sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation, and Holy Orders
Holy Orders
confer, in addition to grace, a sacramental character or seal by which the Christian shares in Christ's priesthood and is made a member of the Church according to different states and functions
[...More...]

.