HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Wuchang Uprising
Decisive Tongmenghui
Tongmenghui
victoryStart of the Xinhai RevolutionBelligerents Qing Empire TongmenghuiCommanders and leaders Yuan Shikai Various others Huang Xing Xiong Bingkun (熊秉坤) Li YuanhongStrength10,000 troops 2,000 troopsCasualties and losses~4,000 killed ~1,000 killedWuchang UprisingTraditional Chinese 武昌起義Hanyu Pinyin Wǔchāng QǐyìTranscriptionsStandard MandarinHanyu Pinyin Wǔchāng QǐyìYue: CantoneseJyutping mou5 coeng1 hei2 ji6The Wuchang Uprising
Wuchang Uprising
was an armed rebellion against the ruling Qing dynasty that took place in Wuchang, Hubei, in China. It was the first successful uprising led by elements of the New Army, influenced by revolutionary ideas from Tongmenghui.[1] Following the uprising, several other uprisings quickly spread across southern China
China
as part of the beginning of the Xinhai Revolution
[...More...]

"Wuchang Uprising" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Overseas Chinese
Overseas Chinese
Overseas Chinese
(Chinese: 海外華人; pinyin: Hǎiwài Huárén) are people of Chinese birth or descent who live outside the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
(the Mainland, Hong Kong, Macau) and the Republic of China
China
(Taiwan)
[...More...]

"Overseas Chinese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yangtze Valley
The Yangtze
Yangtze
(English: /ˈjæŋtsi/ or /ˈjɑːŋtsi/), which is 6,380 km (3,964 miles) long, is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world. The river is the longest in the world to flow entirely within one country. It drains one-fifth of the land area of the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC) and its river basin is home to nearly one-third of the country's population.[7] The Yangtze
Yangtze
is the sixth-largest river by discharge volume in the world. The English name Yangtze
Yangtze
derives from the Chinese name Yángzǐ Jiāng ( listen), which refers to the lowest 435 km of the river between Nanjing
Nanjing
and Shanghai
[...More...]

"Yangtze Valley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Liang Qichao
Liang Qichao
Liang Qichao
(Chinese: 梁啟超; Cantonese: Lèuhng Kái-chīu; 23 February 1873 – 19 January 1929), courtesy name Zhuoru, art name Rengong, was a Chinese scholar, journalist, philosopher, and reformist who lived during the late Qing dynasty
Qing dynasty
and the early Republic of China
[...More...]

"Liang Qichao" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Empress Dowager Cixi
Empress Dowager
Empress Dowager
Cixi1 (Chinese: 慈禧太后; pinyin: Cíxǐ Tàihòu; Manchu: Tsysi taiheo; 29 November 1835 – 15 November 1908), of the Manchu Yehenara clan, was a Chinese empress dowager and regent who effectively controlled the Chinese government in the late Qing dynasty for 47 years from 1861 until her death in 1908. Selected as an imperial concubine of the Xianfeng Emperor
Xianfeng Emperor
in her adolescence, she gave birth to a son, Zaichun, in 1856. After the Xianfeng Emperor's death in 1861, the young boy became the Tongzhi Emperor, and she became the Empress Dowager. Cixi ousted a group of regents appointed by the late emperor and assumed regency, which she shared with Empress Dowager
Empress Dowager
Ci'an
[...More...]

"Empress Dowager Cixi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mid-Autumn Festival
The Mid-Autumn Festival
Mid-Autumn Festival
is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese people.[1][2] The festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar with full moon at night, corresponding to late September to early October of the Gregorian calendar with a full moon at night.[1] Due to ancient China's cultural influence, Mid-Autumn Festival
Mid-Autumn Festival
spread to other parts of Asia
[...More...]

"Mid-Autumn Festival" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Song Jiaoren
Song Jiaoren
Song Jiaoren
(Chinese: 宋教仁; pinyin: Sòng Jiàorén; Wade–Giles: Sung Chiao-jen, [sʊ̂ŋ tɕjâuɻə̌n]; Given name at birth: Liàn 鍊; Courtesy name: Dùnchū 鈍初) (5 April 1882 – 22 March 1913) was a Chinese republican revolutionary, political leader and a founder of the Kuomintang
Kuomintang
(KMT). He was assassinated in 1913 after leading his Kuomintang
Kuomintang
party to victory in China's first democratic elections. Evidence strongly implied that China's provisional president, Yuan Shikai, was responsible for his assassination.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Early Involvement in the Kuomintang 1.3 China's first election campaign 1.4 Assassination 1.5 Legacy2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Song Jiaoren
Song Jiaoren
was born and educated in Hunan
[...More...]

"Song Jiaoren" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokyo
Tokyo
Tokyo
(/ˈtoʊkioʊ/, Japanese: [toːkʲoː] ( listen)), officially Tokyo Metropolis,[6] is the capital city of Japan
Japan
and one of its 47 prefectures.[7] The Greater Tokyo Area
Greater Tokyo Area
is the most populous metropolitan area in the world.[8] It is the seat of the Emperor of Japan
Japan
and the Japanese government. Tokyo
Tokyo
is in the Kantō region
Kantō region
on the southeastern side of the main island Honshu
Honshu
and includes the Izu Islands and Ogasawara Islands.[9] Formerly known as Edo, it has been the de facto seat of government since 1603 when Shōgun
Shōgun
Tokugawa Ieyasu made the city his headquarters
[...More...]

"Tokyo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shandong
Shandong
Shandong
(Chinese: 山东; formerly romanized as Shantung) is a coastal province of the People's Republic of China, and is part of the East China
China
region. Shandong
Shandong
has played a major role in Chinese history from the beginning of Chinese civilization along the lower reaches of the Yellow River and served as a pivotal cultural and religious site for Taoism, Chinese Buddhism, and Confucianism. Shandong's Mount Tai
Mount Tai
is the most revered mountain of Taoism
Taoism
and one of the world's sites with the longest history of continuous religious worship. The Buddhist temples in the mountains to the south of the provincial capital of Jinan
Jinan
were once among the foremost Buddhist sites in China
[...More...]

"Shandong" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kunming
Kunming
Kunming
is the capital and largest city of Yunnan
Yunnan
province in southwest China.[3] Known as Yunnan-Fu until the 1920s, today it is a prefecture-level city and the political, economic, communications and cultural centre of the province as well as the seat of the provincial government. Kunming
Kunming
is also called the Spring city due to its weather. The headquarters of many of Yunnan's large businesses are in Kunming. It was important during World War II
World War II
as a Chinese military center, American air base, and transport terminus for the Burma
Burma
Road. Located in the middle of the Yunnan– Guizhou
Guizhou
Plateau, Kunming
Kunming
is located at an altitude of 1,900 metres (6,234 feet) above sea level and at a latitude just north of the Tropic of Cancer
[...More...]

"Kunming" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ruicheng
Ruicheng County (simplified Chinese: 芮城县; traditional Chinese: 芮城縣; pinyin: Ruìchéng Xiàn) is located in the Yuncheng prefecture of Shanxi province in China. The population as of the 2010 census is around 390,000. Ruicheng is home to the Yongle Palace (永乐宫; Palace of Eternal Joy), a Taoist temple complex noted for the wall paintings inside its three main halls. It was moved to Ruicheng in 1959 to preserve it when the Sanmenxia Dam was built, which was expected to put the town of Yongle, the previous location of the temple, under water. The temple is 4 km north of the town on the main road. The Yellow River lies just south of Ruicheng
[...More...]

"Ruicheng" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manchuria
Manchuria
Manchuria
(simplified Chinese: 满洲; traditional Chinese: 滿洲; pinyin: Mǎnzhōu) was a name first used in the 17th century by Chinese people to refer to a large geographic region in Northeast Asia. Depending on the context, Manchuria
Manchuria
can either refer to a region that falls entirely within the People's Republic of China[1][2][3] or a larger region divided between China
China
and Russia
[...More...]

"Manchuria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Canton-Hankou Railway
The Guangzhou–Hankou or Yuehan railway is a former railroad in China which once connected Guangzhou on the Pearl River in the south with Wuchang on the Yangtze River in the north. At the Yangtze, the railway carriages were ferried to Hankou, which then connected to the Beijing–Hankou railway. It was constructed from 1900 to 1936 and, from their former romanizations, was known at the time as the Canton–Hankow railway. The completion of the Wuhan Yangtze River Bridge in 1957 finally linked the two lines into a single contiguous railway and its former track now forms the southern leg of the Beijing–Guangzhou railway. History[edit]A map of Guangzhou ("Canton") in 1920, showing the route of the "Canton–Hankow railway" from the western suburbs north along the Pearl River.In 1897, a concession for the Beijing–Hankou railway was awarded to a Belgian consortium backed by French financing
[...More...]

"Canton-Hankou Railway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guangdong
Guangdong
Guangdong
(Chinese: 广东) is a province in South China, located on the South China
South China
Sea coast. Traditionally romanised as Kwangtung, Guangdong
Guangdong
surpassed Henan
Henan
and Sichuan
Sichuan
to become the most populous province in China
China
in January 2005, registering 79.1 million permanent residents and 31 million migrants who lived in the province for at least six months of the year;[5][6] the total population was 104,303,132 in the 2010 census, accounting for 7.79 percent of Mainland China's population.[7] This also makes it the most populous first-level administrative subdivision of any country outside the former British Raj, as its population is surpassed only by those of the Pakistani province of Punjab[8] and the Indian states of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
and Uttar Pradesh[9]
[...More...]

"Guangdong" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hunan
Hunan
Hunan
is the 7th most populous province of China
China
and the 10th most extensive by area
[...More...]

"Hunan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sichuan
Sichuan, formerly romanized as Szechuan or Szechwan, is a province in southwest China
China
occupying most of the Sichuan Basin
Sichuan Basin
and the easternmost part of the Tibetan Plateau
Tibetan Plateau
between the Jinsha River
Jinsha River
on the west, the Daba Mountains
Daba Mountains
in the north, and the Yungui Plateau
Yungui Plateau
to the south. Sichuan's capital city is Chengdu. The population of Sichuan
Sichuan
stands at 81 million. In antiquity, Sichuan
Sichuan
was the home of the ancient states of Ba and Shu. Their conquest by Qin strengthened it and paved the way for the First Emperor's unification of China
China
under the Qin dynasty. During the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
era, Liu Bei's Shu was based in Sichuan
[...More...]

"Sichuan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.