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Wright R-2600
The Wright R-2600
Wright R-2600
Cyclone 14 (also called Twin Cyclone) was an American radial engine developed by Curtiss-Wright
Curtiss-Wright
and widely used in aircraft in the 1930s and 1940s.Contents1 History 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (GR-2600-C14BB)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 BibliographyHistory[edit] In 1935, Curtiss-Wright
Curtiss-Wright
began work on a more powerful version of their successful R-1820 Cyclone 9. The result was the R-2600 Twin Cyclone, with 14 cylinders arranged in two rows
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Pushrod
An overhead valve engine (OHV engine) is an engine in which the valves are placed in the cylinder head. This was an improvement over the older flathead engine, where the valves were placed in the cylinder block next to the piston. Overhead camshaft
Overhead camshaft
(OHC) engines, while still overhead valve by definition, are usually categorized apart from other OHV engines
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Metric Horsepower
Horsepower
Horsepower
(hp) is a unit of measurement of power (the rate at which work is done). There are many different standards and types of horsepower. Two common definitions being used today are the mechanical horsepower (or imperial horsepower), which is 745.7 watts, and the metric horsepower, which is approximately 735.5 watts. The term was adopted in the late 18th century by Scottish engineer James Watt
Watt
to compare the output of steam engines with the power of draft horses. It was later expanded to include the output power of other types of piston engines, as well as turbines, electric motors and other machinery.[1][2] The definition of the unit varied among geographical regions. Most countries now use the SI unit watt for measurement of power
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Cincinnati, Ohio
Cincinnati
Cincinnati
(/ˌsɪnsɪˈnæti/ SIN-sih-NAT-ee) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio
Ohio
and seat of Hamilton County.[7] Settled in 1788, the city was located at the north side of the confluence of the Licking River to the Ohio. The city drives the Cincinnati–Middletown–Wilmington combined statistical area, which had a population of 2,172,191 in the 2010 census.[8] With a population of 298,800, Cincinnati
Cincinnati
is the third-largest city proper in Ohio
Ohio
and the 65th-biggest in the United States. It is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwestern United States[9] and the 28th-biggest metropolitan statistical area in the United States
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Paterson, New Jersey
Paterson is the largest city in and the county seat of Passaic County, New Jersey, United States.[19] As of the 2010 United States
United States
Census, its population was 146,199,[9][10][11] rendering it New Jersey's third-most-populous city.[20] Paterson has the second-highest density of any U.S. city with over 100,000 people, behind only New York City.[21] For 2015, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program calculated a population of 147,754, an increase of 1.1% from the 2010 enumeration,[12] ranking the city the 177th-largest in the nation.[22] Paterson is known as the " Silk
Silk
City" for its dominant role in silk production during the latter half of the 19th century.[1] The city has since evolved into a major destination for Hispanic
Hispanic
immigrants as well as for immigrants from the Arab
Arab
and Muslim
Muslim
world
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Power Density
Power density (or volume power density or volume specific power) is the amount of power (time rate of energy transfer) per unit volume. In energy transformers including batteries, fuel cells, motors, etc., and also power supply units or similar, power density refers to a volume. It is then also called volume power density, which is expressed as W/m3. Volume
Volume
power density is sometimes an important consideration where space is constrained. In reciprocating internal combustion engines, power density—power per swept volume or brake horsepower per cubic centimeter —is an important metric. This is based on the internal capacity of the engine, not its external size. Power densities of common materials[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Sodium
Sodium
Sodium
is a chemical element with symbol Na (from Latin natrium) and atomic number 11. It is a soft, silvery-white, highly reactive metal. Sodium
Sodium
is an alkali metal, being in group 1 of the periodic table, because it has a single electron in its outer shell that it readily donates, creating a positively charged ion—the Na+ cation. Its only stable isotope is 23Na. The free metal does not occur in nature, but must be prepared from compounds. Sodium
Sodium
is the sixth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, and exists in numerous minerals such as feldspars, sodalite, and rock salt (NaCl)
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Compression Ratio
The static compression ratio of an internal combustion engine or external combustion engine is a value that represents the ratio of the volume of its combustion chamber from its largest capacity to its smallest capacity. It is a fundamental specification for many common combustion engines. In a piston engine, it is the ratio between the volume of the cylinder and combustion chamber when the piston is at the bottom of its stroke, and the volume of the combustion chamber when the piston is at the top of its stroke.[1] For example, a cylinder and its combustion chamber with the piston at the bottom of its stroke may contain 1000 cc of air (900 cc in the cylinder plus 100 cc in the combustion chamber)
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Power-to-weight Ratio
Power-to-weight ratio (or specific power or power-to-mass ratio) is a calculation commonly applied to engines and mobile power sources to enable the comparison of one unit or design to another. Power-to-weight ratio is a measurement of actual performance of any engine or power source. It is also used as a measurement of performance of a vehicle as a whole, with the engine's power output being divided by the weight (or mass) of the vehicle, to give a metric that is independent of the vehicle's size. Power-to-weight is often quoted by manufacturers at the peak value, but the actual value may vary in use and variations will affect performance. The inverse of power-to-weight, weight-to-power ratio (power loading) is a calculation commonly applied to aircraft, cars, and vehicles in general, to enable the comparison of one vehicle's performance to another
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Kilowatt
The watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power. In the International System of Units (SI) it is defined as a derived unit of 1 joule per second,[1] and is used to quantify the rate of energy transfer
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Dry Sump
A dry-sump system is a method to manage the lubricating motor oil in four-stroke and large two-stroke piston driven internal combustion engines. The dry-sump system uses two or more oil pumps and a separate oil reservoir, as opposed to a conventional wet-sump system, which uses only the main sump (U.S.: oil pan) below the engine and a single pump. A dry-sump engine requires a pressure relief valve to regulate negative pressure inside the engine, so internal seals are not inverted. Engines are both lubricated and cooled by oil that circulates throughout the engine, feeding various bearings and other moving parts and then draining, via gravity, into the sump at the base of the engine. In the wet-sump system of most production automobile engines, a pump collects this oil from the sump and directly circulates it back through the engine
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Horsepower
Horsepower
Horsepower
(hp) is a unit of measurement of power (the rate at which work is done). There are many different standards and types of horsepower. Two common definitions being used today are the mechanical horsepower (or imperial horsepower), which is 745.7 watts, and the metric horsepower, which is approximately 735.5 watts. The term was adopted in the late 18th century by Scottish engineer James Watt
Watt
to compare the output of steam engines with the power of draft horses. It was later expanded to include the output power of other types of piston engines, as well as turbines, electric motors and other machinery.[1][2] The definition of the unit varied among geographical regions. Most countries now use the SI unit watt for measurement of power
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Carburetor
A carburetor (American English) or carburettor (British English; see spelling differences) is a device that mixes air and fuel for internal combustion engines in the proper ratio for combustion. It is sometimes colloquially shortened to carb in the UK and North America or carby in Australia.[1] To carburate or carburet (and thus carburation or carburetion, respectively) means to mix the air and fuel or to equip (an engine) with a carburetor for that purpose. Carburetors have largely been supplanted in the automotive and, to a lesser extent, aviation industries by fuel injection
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Impeller
An impeller (also written as impellor[1] or impellar) is a rotor used to increase (or decrease in case of turbines) the pressure and flow of a fluid.An impeller for a dam turbine generatorContents1 In pumps1.1 Heart pumps in medicine2 Types 3 In centrifugal compressors 4 In water jets 5 In agitated tanks5.1 Example 5.2 Propellers6 In washing machines 7 Firefighting
Firefighting
rank badge 8 In medical devices 9 In air pumps 10 See also 11 ReferencesIn pumps[edit]Several different types of pump impellers Flexible impeller
Flexible impeller
of cooling system pump of an outboard engine
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Centrifugal Type Supercharger
A centrifugal supercharger is a specialized type of supercharger that makes use of centrifugal force in order to push additional air into an engine
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