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World Wide Fund For Nature
a First office opened 11 September 1961 in Morges,    Switzerland. b Also the WWF's first president.[3] Earth Hour
Earth Hour
2013 at the Verona Arena
Verona Arena
amphitheatre, Piazza Bra, Verona, Italy before (top) and while the street lighting was switched off.The World
World
Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) is an international non-governmental organization founded in 1961, working in the field of the wilderness preservation, and the reduction of human impact on the environment. It was formerly named the World
World
Wildlife Fund, which remains its official name in Canada
Canada
and the United States
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Prince Bernhard Of Lippe-Biesterfeld
Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld
Lippe-Biesterfeld
(later Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands; German: Bernhard Friedrich Eberhard Leopold Julius Kurt Carl Gottfried Peter Graf von Biesterfeld; 29 June 1911 – 1 December 2004) was a German-born prince who was the consort of Queen Juliana
Queen Juliana
of the Netherlands; they were the parents of four children, including the former Queen of the Netherlands, Princess Beatrix. He belonged to the princely House of Lippe
House of Lippe
and was a nephew of the Principality
Principality
of Lippe's last sovereign Leopold IV. From birth he held the title Count of Biesterfeld; his uncle raised him to princely rank with the style of Serene Highness in 1916. He studied law and worked as an executive secretary at the Paris
Paris
office of IG Farben
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Forest
A forest is a large area dominated by trees.[1] Hundreds of more precise definitions of forest are used throughout the world, incorporating factors such as tree density, tree height, land use, legal standing and ecological function.[2][3][4] According to the widely used[5][6] Food and Agriculture Organization
Food and Agriculture Organization
definition, forests covered 4 billion hectares (9.9×109 acres) (15 million square miles) or approximately 30 percent of the world's land area in 2006.[4] Forests are the dominant terrestrial ecosystem of Earth, and are distributed across the globe.[7] Forests account for 75% of the gross primary productivity of the Earth's biosphere, and contain 80% of the Earth's plant biomass.[7] Forests at different latitudes and elevations form distinctly different ecozones: boreal forests near the poles, tropical forests near the equator and temperate forests at mid-latitudes
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Living Planet Index
The Living Planet Index
Living Planet Index
(LPI) is an indicator of the state of global biological diversity, based on trends in vertebrate populations of species from around the world. The LPI provides the general public, scientists and policy-makers with information on trends in the abundance of the world’s vertebrates and offers insights into which habitats or ecosystems are declining most rapidly
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Ecological Footprint
The ecological footprint measures human demand on nature, i.e., the quantity of nature it takes to support people or an economy. It tracks this demand through an ecological accounting system. The accounts contrast the biologically productive area people use for their consumption to the biologically productive area available within a region or the world (biocapacity - the productive area that can regenerate what people demand from nature). In short, it is a measure of human impact on Earth's ecosystem and reveals the dependence of the human economy on natural capital. The ecological footprint is defined as the biologically productive area needed to provide for everything people use: fruits and vegetables, fish, wood, fibers, absorption of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, and space for buildings and roads. Footprint and biocapacity can be compared at the individual, regional, national or global scale
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Environmental Organization
An environmental organization is an organization coming out of the conservation or environmental movements that seeks to protect, analyse or monitor the environment against misuse or degradation from human forces. In this sense the environment may refer to the biophysical environment, the natural environment or the built environment. The organization may be a charity, a trust, a non-governmental organization or a government organization. Environmental organizations can be global, national, regional or local.Contents1 History 2 Politics 3 Issues in focus 4 List of environmental organizations 5 Counter-movements 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingHistory[edit] Founded on 28 May 1892 in San Francisco, California, Sierra Club
Sierra Club
was one of the first large-scale environmental preservation organizations in the world.[1] Politics[edit] Most organizations exert more influence through their involvement in policy making
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World Bank
The World Bank
World Bank
(French: Banque mondiale)[2] is an international financial institution that provides loans[3] to countries of the world for capital projects. It comprises two institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), and the International Development Association (IDA)
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Department For International Development
The Department for International Development
Department for International Development
(DFID) is a United Kingdom government department responsible for administering overseas aid. The goal of the department is "to promote sustainable development and eliminate world poverty". DFID is headed by the United Kingdom's Secretary of State for International Development. The position has been held, since 9 November 2017, by Penny Mordaunt
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United States Agency For International Development
The United States Agency for International Development
United States Agency for International Development
(USAID) is an independent agency of the United States federal government
United States federal government
that is primarily responsible for administering civilian foreign aid and development assistance. With a budget of over $27 billion, USAID
USAID
is one of the largest official aid agencies in the world, and accounts for more than half of all U.S. foreign assistance (which in absolute dollar terms is the highest in the world). Congress passed the Foreign Assistance Act
Foreign Assistance Act
on September 4, 1961, which reorganized U.S. foreign assistance programs and mandated the creation of an agency to administer economic aid. USAID
USAID
was subsequently established by the executive order of President John F
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Biome
A biome /ˈbaɪoʊm/ is a community of plants and animals that have common characteristics for the environment they exist in. They can be found over a range of continents. Biomes are distinct biological communities that have formed in response to a shared physical climate.[1][2] "Biome" is a broader term than "habitat"; any biome can comprise a variety of habitats. While a biome can cover large areas, a microbiome is a mix of organisms that coexist in a defined space on a much smaller scale. For example, the human microbiome is the collection of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present on a human body.[3] A 'biota' is the total collection of organisms of a geographic region or a time period, from local geographic scales and instantaneous temporal scales all the way up to whole-planet and whole-timescale spatiotemporal scales
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Biodiversity
Biodiversity, a portmanteau of "bio" (life) and "diversity", generally refers to the variety and variability of life on Earth. According to the United Nations Environment Programme
United Nations Environment Programme
(UNEP), biodiversity typically measures variation at the genetic, the species, and the ecosystem level.[1] Terrestrial biodiversity tends to be greater near the equator,[2] which seems to be the result of the warm climate and high primary productivity.[3] Biodiversity
Biodiversity
is not distributed evenly on Earth, and is richest in the tropics
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Oceans
An ocean (from Ancient Greek Ὠκεανός, transc. Okeanós, the sea of classical antiquity[1]) is a body of saline water that composes much of a planet's hydrosphere.[2] On Earth, an ocean is one of the major conventional divisions of the World
World
Ocean
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Coasts
A coastline or a seashore is the area where land meets the sea or ocean,[1] or a line that forms the boundary between the land and the ocean or a lake.[2] A precise line that can be called a coastline cannot be determined due to the Coastline paradox. The term coastal zone is a region where interaction of the sea and land processes occurs.[3] Both the terms coast and coastal are often used to describe a geographic location or region; for example, New Zealand's West Coast, or the East and West Coasts of the United States. Edinburgh for example is a city on the coast of Scotland. A pelagic coast refers to a coast which fronts the open ocean, as opposed to a more sheltered coast in a gulf or bay. A shore, on the other hand, can refer to parts of land adjoining any large body of water, including oceans (sea shore) and lakes (lake shore)
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Freshwater
Fresh water
Fresh water
(or freshwater) is naturally occurring water on Earth's surface in ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, icebergs, bogs, ponds, lakes, rivers and streams, and underground as groundwater. Fresh water is generally characterized by having low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids. The term specifically excludes seawater and brackish water although it does include mineral-rich waters such as chalybeate springs. Fresh water
Fresh water
is not the same as potable water (or drinking water): Much of the earth's surface fresh water and groundwater is unsuitable for drinking without some form of treatment
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Endangered Species
An endangered species is a species which has been categorized as very likely to become extinct. Endangered (EN), as categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN) Red List, is the second most severe conservation status for wild populations in the IUCN's schema after Critically Endangered (CR). In 2012, the IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
featured 3079 animal and 2655 plant species as endangered (EN) worldwide.[1] The figures for 1998 were, respectively, 1102 and 1197. Many nations have laws that protect conservation-reliant species: for example, forbidding hunting, restricting land development or creating preserves
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