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World Bank
The World Bank
World Bank
(French: Banque mondiale)[2] is an international financial institution that provides loans[3] to countries of the world for capital projects. It comprises two institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), and the International Development Association (IDA)
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Coalition Government
A coalition government is a cabinet of a parliamentary government in which many or multiple political parties cooperate, reducing the dominance of any one party within that coalition. The usual reason for this arrangement is that no party on its own can achieve a majority in the parliament. A coalition government might also be created in a time of national difficulty or crisis (for example, during wartime or economic crisis) to give a government the high degree of perceived political legitimacy or collective identity it desires while also playing a role in diminishing internal political strife. In such times, parties have formed all-party coalitions (national unity governments, grand coalitions)
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Fiscal Conservatism
Fiscal conservatism
Fiscal conservatism
(also economic conservatism or conservative economics) is a political-economic philosophy regarding fiscal policy and fiscal responsibility advocating low taxes, reduced government spending and minimal government debt.[1] Free trade, deregulation of the economy, lower taxes, and privatization are the defining qualities of fiscal conservatism
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Tripartite System (politics)
The separation of powers, often imprecisely and metonymically used interchangeably with the trias politica principle, is a model for the governance of a state. Under this model, a state's government is divided into branches, each with separate and independent powers and areas of responsibility so that the powers of one branch are not in conflict with the powers associated with the other branches. The typical division is into three branches: a legislature, an executive, and a judiciary, which is the trias politica model
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Marshall Plan
The Marshall Plan (officially the European Recovery Program, ERP) was an American initiative to aid Western Europe, in which the United States gave over $13 billion[1] (nearly $110 billion in 2016 US dollars)[2] in economic assistance to help rebuild Western European economies after the end of World War II. The plan was in operation for four years beginning on April 3, 1948.[3] The goals of the United States were to rebuild war-torn regions, remove trade barriers, modernize industry, improve European prosperity, and prevent the spread of Communism.[4] The Marshall Plan required a lessening of interstate barriers, a dropping of many regulations, and encouraged an increase in productivity, trade union membership, as well as the adoption of modern business procedures.[5] The Marshall Plan aid was divided amongst the participant states roughly on a per capita basis
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Earmark (finance)
The hypothecation of a tax (also known as the ring fencing or ear marking of a tax) is the dedication of the revenue from a specific tax for a particular expenditure purpose.[1] This approach differs from the classical method according to which all government spending is done from a consolidated fund.Contents1 History 2 Types of hypothecated tax 3 Benefits 4 Criticism 5 Examples 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingHistory[edit] The history of hypothecated taxes has a long history. One of the first examples of earmarking was ‘Ship Money’ or in other words the tax paid by English seaports used to finance the Royal Navy.[1] Later, in the 20th century, the hypothecated tax began to be discussed by politicians in the United Kingdom
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Need
A need is something that is necessary for an organism to live a healthy life. Needs are distinguished from wants in that, in the case of a need, a deficiency causes a clear adverse outcome: a dysfunction or death. In other words, a need is something required for a safe, stable and healthy life (e.g. food, water, shelter) while a want is a desire, wish or aspiration. When needs or wants are backed by purchasing power, they have the potential to become economic demands. Basic needs such as water, air, food and protection from environmental dangers are necessary for an organism to live. In addition to basic needs, humans also have needs of a social or societal nature such as the human need to socialise of belong to a family unit or group
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Barack Obama
Pre-presidency Illinois
Illinois
State Senator 2004 DNC keynote address U.S
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Family
In the context of human society, a family (from Latin: familia) is a group of people related either by consanguinity (by recognized birth), affinity (by marriage or other relationship), or co-residence (as implied by the etymology of the English word "family"[citation needed] [...] from Latin familia 'family servants, domestics collectively, the servants in a household,' thus also 'members of a household, the estate, property; the household, including relatives and servants,' abstract noun formed from famulus 'servant, slave [...]'[1]) or some combination of these.[citation needed] Members of the immediate family may include spouses, parents, brothers, sisters, sons, and daughters[citation needed]. Members of the extended family may include grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, nephews, nieces, and siblings-in-law[citation needed]
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United States State Department
The United States
United States
Department of State (DOS),[3] often referred to as the State Department, is the United States
United States
federal executive department that advises the President and represents the country in international affairs and foreign policy issues.[4] Equivalent to the foreign ministry of other countries, the State Department is responsible for the international relations of the United States, negotiates treaties and agreements with foreign entities, and represents the United States
United States
at the United Nations
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Lyndon B. Johnson
Lyndon Baines Johnson (/ˈlɪndən ˈbeɪnz/; August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to by his initials LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after having served as the 37th Vice President of the United States from 1961 to 1963. A Democrat from Texas, he also served as a United States Representative and as the Majority Leader in the United States Senate. Johnson is one of only four people who have served in all four federal elected positions.[a] Born in a farmhouse in Stonewall, Texas, Johnson was a high school teacher and worked as a Congressional aide before winning election to the House of Representatives in 1937. He won election to the Senate in 1948, and was appointed the position of Senate Majority Whip in 1951. He became the Senate Minority Leader in 1953 and the Senate Majority Leader in 1955
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districts
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Jimmy Carter
Governor of Georgia1970 Georgia gubernatorial campaign1972 presidential campaignConvention1976 Presidential Race1976 presidential campaignElectionPresident of the United StatesPresidencyTimelineInaugurationCamp David AccordsEgypt- Israel
Israel
Peace TreatyTorrijos-Carter Treaties Iran
Iran
Hostage CrisisOperation Eagle ClawMoral Equivalent of War speech 1979 Energy Crisis Carter Doctrine Diplomatic Relations with ChinaAppointmentsCabinet JudiciaryPost-PresidencyPresidential Library Activities Carter Center One America Appealv t eJames Earl Carter Jr. (born October 1, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1977 to 1981
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Country
A country is a region that is identified as a distinct national entity in political geography. A country may be an independent sovereign state or one that is occupied by another state, as a non-sovereign or formerly sovereign political division, or a geographic region associated with sets of previously independent or differently associated people with distinct political characteristics
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Chase Manhattan Bank
JPMorgan Chase
JPMorgan Chase
Bank, N.A., doing business as Chase Bank, is a national bank headquartered in Manhattan, New York City, that constitutes the consumer and commercial banking subsidiary of the U.S. multinational banking and financial services holding company, JPMorgan Chase
JPMorgan Chase
& Co. The bank was known as Chase Manhattan
Manhattan
Bank
Bank
until it merged with J.P. Morgan & Co
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Foreign Direct Investment
A foreign direct investment (FDI) is an investment in the form of a controlling ownership in a business in one country by an entity based in another country.[1] It is thus distinguished from a foreign portfolio investment by a notion of direct control. The origin of the investment does not impact the definition, as an FDI: the investment may be made either "inorganically" by buying a company in the target country or "organically" by expanding the operations of an existing business in that country.Contents1 Definition 2 Theoretical background 3 Methods3.1 Forms of FDI incentives4 Importance and barriers to FDI4.1 Developing world 4.2 China 4.3 India 4.4 United States 4.5 Canada 4.6 United Kingdom 4.7 Russian Federation5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] Broadly, foreign direct investment includes "mergers and acquisitions, building new facilities, reinvesting profits earned from overseas operations, and intra company loans"
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