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Works Progress Administration
The Works Progress Administration
Works Progress Administration
(WPA; renamed in 1939 as the Work Projects Administration) was the largest and most ambitious American New Deal
New Deal
agency, employing millions of people (mostly unskilled men) to carry out public works projects,[1] including the construction of public buildings and roads. In a much smaller project, Federal Project Number One, the WPA employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects.[1] Almost every community in the United States had a new park, bridge or school constructed by the agency. The WPA's initial appropriation in 1935 was for $4.9 billion (about 6.7 percent of the 1935 GDP).[2] Headed by Harry Hopkins, the WPA provided jobs and income to the unemployed during the Great Depression
Great Depression
in the United States
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Sidney Lumet
Sidney Arthur Lumet (/luːˈmɛt/ loo-MET; June 25, 1924 – April 9, 2011) was an American director, producer and screenwriter with over 50 films to his credit. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director for 12 Angry Men (1957), Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976), and The Verdict
The Verdict
(1982)
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Executive Order (United States)
In the United States, an executive order is a directive issued by the President of the United States
United States
that manages operations of the federal government, and have the force of law.[1] The legal or constitutional basis for executive orders has multiple sources. Article Two of the United States
United States
Constitution gives the president broad executive and enforcement authority to use their discretion to determine how to enforce the law or to otherwise manage the resources and staff of the executive branch
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E.G. Marshall
E. G. Marshall
E. G. Marshall
(born Everett Eugene Grunz, June 18, 1914 – August 24, 1998) was an American actor, best known for his television roles as the lawyer Lawrence Preston on The Defenders in the 1960s and as neurosurgeon David Craig on The Bold Ones: The New Doctors in the 1970s. Among his film roles he is perhaps best known as the unflappable, conscientious "Juror #4" in Sidney Lumet's courtroom drama 12 Angry Men (1957).[1][2][3] He also played the President of the United States in Superman II
Superman II
(1980) and Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut (2006).Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Career 1.3 Personal life 1.4 Death2 Partial filmography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Marshall was born in Owatonna, Minnesota, the son of Hazel Irene (née Cobb; 1892–1975) and Charles G. Grunz (1882–1959)
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Virgil Thomson
Virgil Thomson
Virgil Thomson
(November 25, 1896 – September 30, 1989) was an American composer and critic. He was instrumental in the development of the "American Sound" in classical music. He has been described as a modernist,[1][2][3][4][5] a neoromantic,[6] a neoclassicist,[7] and a composer of "an Olympian blend of humanity and detachment"[8] whose "expressive voice was always carefully muted" until his late opera Lord Byron which, in contrast to all his previous work, exhibited an emotional content that rises to "moments of real passion".[9]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Later years 1.3 Awards and honors 1.4 Death2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Thomson was born in Kansas City, Missouri. As a child, he befriended Alice Smith, great-granddaughter of Joseph Smith, founder of the Latter-day Saint movement
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Will Geer
Will Geer
Will Geer
(March 9, 1902 – April 22, 1978) was an American actor and social activist, known for his portrayal of Grandpa Zebulon Tyler Walton in the 1970s TV series
TV series
The Waltons.Contents1 Personal life 2 Early career 3 Blacklist 4 Later years 5 TV and filmography 6 Discography 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksPersonal life[edit] Geer was born William Aughe Ghere in Frankfort, Indiana, the son of Katherine (née Aughe), a teacher, and Roy Aaron Ghere, a postal worker.[1][2] His father left the family when the boy was only 11 years old. He was deeply influenced by his grandfather, who taught him the botanical names of the plants in his native state. Geer started out to become a botanist, studying the subject and obtaining a master's degree at the University of Chicago
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Canada Lee
Canada Lee (born Leonard Lionel Cornelius Canegata, March 3, 1907 – May 9, 1952) was an American actor who pioneered roles for African Americans. After careers as a jockey, boxer and musician, he became an actor in the Federal Theatre Project, most notably in a 1936 production of Macbeth adapted and directed by Orson Welles. Lee later starred in Welles's original Broadway production of Native Son (1941). A champion of civil rights in the 1930s and 1940s, Lee was blacklisted and died shortly before he was scheduled to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee. He furthered the African-American tradition in theatre pioneered by such actors as Paul Robeson
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Joseph Cotten
Joseph Cheshire Cotten Jr. (May 15, 1905 – February 6, 1994) was an American film, stage, radio and television actor. Cotten achieved prominence on Broadway, starring in the original stage productions of The Philadelphia Story and Sabrina Fair. He first gained worldwide fame in three Orson Welles
Orson Welles
films: Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), and Journey into Fear (1943), for which Cotten was also credited with the screenplay. He went on to become one of the leading Hollywood actors of the 1940s, appearing in films such as Shadow of a Doubt
Shadow of a Doubt
(1943), Love Letters (1945), Duel in the Sun (1946), Portrait of Jennie
Portrait of Jennie
(1948), The Third Man (1949) and Niagara (1953)
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Burt Lancaster
Burton Stephen Lancaster (November 2, 1913 – October 20, 1994) was an American actor and producer. Initially known for playing "tough guys", he went on to achieve success with more complex and challenging roles. He was nominated four times for Academy Awards
Academy Awards
and won once for his work in Elmer Gantry in 1960. He also won a Golden Globe
Golden Globe
for that performance and BAFTA Awards for The Birdman of Alcatraz
Birdman of Alcatraz
(1962) and Atlantic City (1980). During the 1950s, his production company Hecht-Hill-Lancaster was highly successful, making films such as Trapeze (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), and Separate Tables (1958)
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Hollywood
Hollywood
Hollywood
(/ˈhɒliwʊd/ HOL-ee-wuud) is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. This densely populated neighborhood is notable as the home of the U.S
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Cleveland Orchestra
The Cleveland
Cleveland
Orchestra, based in Cleveland, is one of the five American orchestras informally referred to as the "Big Five".[1] Founded in 1918 by the pianist and impresario Adella Prentiss Hughes, the orchestra plays most of its concerts at Severance Hall. As of 2017, the incumbent music director is Franz Welser-Möst. In 2012 Gramophone Magazine ranked the Cleveland
Cleveland
Orchestra
Orchestra
number 7 on its list of 20 of the world's greatest orchestras.[2]Contents1 History 2 Locations 3 Music directors 4 Daniel R. Lewis Young Composer Fellows 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] The orchestra was founded in 1918 by Adella Prentiss Hughes, with Nikolai Sokoloff
Nikolai Sokoloff
as its principal conductor. From early in its existence, it toured throughout the eastern United States, made radio broadcasts, and recorded many albums
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Nikolai Sokoloff
Nikolai Grigoryevich Sokoloff (28 May 1886 – 25 September 1965) was a Russian-American conductor and violinist. He was born in Kiev, and studied music at Yale. From 1916 to 1917 he was musical director of the San Francisco People's Philharmonic Orchestra, where he insisted on including women in his orchestra and paying them the same as men. Sokoloff was the founding conductor and music director of the Cleveland Orchestra in 1918 where he remained until 1932. Between 1935 and 1938 he directed the Federal Music Project, a New Deal program that employed musicians to perform and educate the public about music. From 1938 to 1941 he directed the Seattle Symphony Orchestra. When he was a conductor he gave a violin to then nine-year-old violin prodigy Yehudi Menuhin. Sokoloff was the uncle of the pianist Vladimir Sokoloff. Notable recording premieres[edit]Rachmaninoff, Symphony No. 2, Cleveland Orchestra, 1928References[edit]Gibbs, Jason (Fall 2002)
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Lafayette Square (New Orleans)
Lafayette Square is the second-oldest public park in New Orleans, Louisiana (after Jackson Square), located in the present-day Central Business District. During the late 18th century, this was part of a residential area called Faubourg Sainte Marie (English: St. Mary Suburb). The park was designed in 1788 by Charles Laveau Trudeau aka Don Carlos Trudeau (1743–1816), Surveyor General of Louisiana under the Spanish government; who later served as New Orleans' acting mayor in 1812, after Louisiana statehood. The Square was named after Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, a French aristocrat and general who fought on the American side in the American Revolutionary War.[1] The park has a bronze statue of Henry Clay in the center of the park, and statues of John McDonogh and Benjamin Franklin on St. Charles Avenue and Camp Street. Gallier Hall, the former City Hall of New Orleans faces the square on St. Charles Avenue
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South Carolina
South Carolina
South Carolina
(/ˌkærəˈlaɪnə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the southeastern region of the United States. The state is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the south and west by Georgia, across the Savannah River, and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution, on May 23, 1788. South Carolina
South Carolina
became the first state to vote in favor of secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina
South Carolina
is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state. Its GDP
GDP
as of 2013 was $183.6 billion, with an annual growth rate of 3.13%.[6] South Carolina
South Carolina
is composed of 46 counties
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Skill (labor)
Skill is a measure of the amount of worker's expertise, specialization, wages, and supervisory capacity. Skilled workers are generally more trained, higher paid, and have more responsibilities than unskilled workers.[1] Skilled workers have long had historical import (see Division of labor) as masons, carpenters, blacksmiths, bakers, brewers, coopers, printers and other occupations that are economically productive. Skilled workers were often politically active through their craft guilds.Contents1 Relative demand of skilled labor 2 Foundation, transferable, and technical and vocational skills2.1 Foundation skills 2.2 Transferable skills 2.3 Technical and vocational skills3 See also 4 Sources 5 References 6 Further readingRelative demand of skilled labor[edit] One of the factors that increases the relative demand for skilled labor is the introduction of computers
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White-collar Worker
In many countries (such as Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and United States), a white-collar worker is a person who performs professional, managerial, or administrative work. White-collar work may be performed in an office or other administrative setting. Other types of work are those of a blue-collar worker, whose job requires manual labor and a pink-collar worker, whose labor is related to customer interaction, entertainment, sales, or other service-oriented work
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