HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Word Coinage
In linguistics, word formation is the creation of a new word. Word formation is sometimes contrasted with semantic change, which is a change in a single word's meaning. The boundary between word formation and semantic change can be difficult to define: a new use of an old word can be seen as a new word derived from an old one and identical to it in form
[...More...]

"Word Coinage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Linguistics
Linguistics
Linguistics
is the scientific[1] study of language,[2] and involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context.[3] The earliest activities in the documentation and description of language have been attributed to the 4th century BC Indian grammarian Pāṇini,[4][5] who wrote a formal description of the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language in his Aṣṭādhyāyī.[6] Linguists traditionally analyse human language by observing an interplay between sound and meaning.[7] Phonetics is the study of speech and non-speech sounds, and delves into their acoustic and articulatory properties
[...More...]

"Linguistics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Word
In linguistics, a word is the smallest element that can be uttered in isolation with objective or practical meaning. This contrasts deeply with a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning but will not necessarily stand on its own. A word may consist of a single morpheme (for example: oh!, rock, red, quick, run, expect), or several (rocks, redness, quickly, running, unexpected), whereas a morpheme may not be able to stand on its own as a word (in the words just mentioned, these are -s, -ness, -ly, -ing, un-, -ed). A complex word will typically include a root and one or more affixes (rock-s, red-ness, quick-ly, run-ning, un-expect-ed), or more than one root in a compound (black-board, sand-box)
[...More...]

"Word" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ghil'ad Zuckermann
Ghil'ad Zuckermann
Ghil'ad Zuckermann
(Hebrew: גלעד צוקרמן‬ , pronounced [ɡi'lad ˈtsukeʁman], born 1 June 1971) is an Israeli linguist and revivalist who works in contact linguistics, lexicology and the study of language, culture and identity.[1] Zuckermann is Chair of Linguistics
Linguistics
and Endangered Languages
Languages
at the University of Adelaide.Contents1 Biography 2 Public impact2.1 Reclamation of the Barngarla language 2.2 Adelaide Language Festival3 Contributions to linguistics 4 Selected publications4.1 Books and book chapters 4.2 Journal articles5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Zuckermann was born in Tel Aviv, Israel
Israel
on 1 June 1971, and grew up in Eilat. He attended the United World College (UWC) of the Adriatic in 1987–1989
[...More...]

"Ghil'ad Zuckermann" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Semantic
Semantics (from Ancient Greek: σημαντικός sēmantikos, "significant")[1][2] is the linguistic and philosophical study of meaning, in language, programming languages, formal logics, and semiotics. It is concerned with the relationship between signifiers—like words, phrases, signs, and symbols—and what they stand for, their denotation. In international scientific vocabulary semantics is also called semasiology. The word semantics was first used by Michel Bréal, a French philologist.[3] It denotes a range of ideas—from the popular to the highly technical. It is often used in ordinary language for denoting a problem of understanding that comes down to word selection or connotation. This problem of understanding has been the subject of many formal enquiries, over a long period of time, especially in the field of formal semantics
[...More...]

"Semantic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Phonetic
Phonetics (pronounced /fəˈnɛtɪks/) is a branch of linguistics that studies the sounds of human speech, or—in the case of sign languages—the equivalent aspects of sign.[1] It is concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds or signs (phones): their physiological production, acoustic properties, auditory perception, and neurophysiological status
[...More...]

"Phonetic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cuckoo
Around 26The cuckoos are a family of birds, Cuculidae, the sole taxon in the order Cuculiformes.[1][2][3] The cuckoo family includes the common or European cuckoo, roadrunners, koels, malkohas, couas, coucals and anis. The coucals and anis are sometimes separated as distinct families, the Centropodidae
Centropodidae
and Crotophagidae
Crotophagidae
respectively. The cuckoo order Cuculiformes is one of three that make up the Otidimorphae, the other two being the turacos and the bustards. The cuckoos are generally medium-sized slender birds. Most species live in trees, though a sizeable minority are ground-dwelling. The family has a cosmopolitan distribution, with the majority of species being tropical. Some species are migratory. The cuckoos feed on insects, insect larvae and a variety of other animals, as well as fruit
[...More...]

"Cuckoo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Onomatopoeia
An onomatopoeia (/ˌɒnəˌmætəˈpiːə, -ˌmɑː-/ ( listen);[1][2] from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία;[3] ὄνομα for "name"[4] and ποιέω for "I make",[5] adjectival form: "onomatopoeic" or "onomatopoetic") is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the sound that it describes. As an uncountable noun, onomatopoeia refers to the property of such words
[...More...]

"Onomatopoeia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Loanword
A loanword (also loan word or loan-word) is a word adopted from one language (the donor language) and incorporated into another language without translation
[...More...]

"Loanword" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Orwellian
"Orwellian" is an adjective describing a situation, idea, or societal condition that George Orwell
George Orwell
identified as being destructive to the welfare of a free and open society. It denotes an attitude and a brutal policy of draconian control by propaganda, surveillance, misinformation, denial of truth (doublethink), and manipulation of the past, including the "unperson"—a person whose past existence is expunged from the public record and memory, practised by modern repressive governments
[...More...]

"Orwellian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Corporation /ˈzɪərɒks/ (also known as Xerox, stylized as xerox since 2008, and previously as XEROX from 1960 to 2008) is an American global corporation that sells print and digital document solutions, and document technology products in more than 160 countries.[3] Xerox
Xerox
is headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut
Norwalk, Connecticut
(having moved from Stamford, Connecticut
Connecticut
in October 2007),[4] though its largest population of employees is based around Rochester, New York, the area in which the company was founded
[...More...]

"Xerox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eponym
An eponym is a person, place, or thing after whom or after which something is named, or believed to be named. The adjectives derived from eponym include eponymous and eponymic. For example, Elizabeth I of England is the eponym of the Elizabethan era, and "the eponymous founder of the Ford Motor Company" refers to Henry Ford
[...More...]

"Eponym" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Neologism
A neologism (/niːˈɒlədʒɪzəm/; from Greek νέο- néo-, "new" and λόγος lógos, "speech, utterance") is a relatively recent or isolated term, word, or phrase that may be in the process of entering common use, but that has not yet been fully accepted into mainstream language.[1] Neologisms are often directly attributable to a specific person, publication, period, or event. In the process of language formation, neologisms are more mature than protologisms.[2]Contents1 Background 2 Sources 3 History and meaning 4 Literature 5 Popular culture 6 Translations 7 Other uses 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksBackground[edit] Neologisms are often created by combining existing words (see compound noun and adjective) or by giving words new and unique suffixes or prefixes. Portmanteaux
Portmanteaux
are combined words that are sometimes used commonly. "Brunch" is an example of a portmanteau word (breakfast + lunch)
[...More...]

"Neologism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Semantic Loan
A semantic loan is a process of borrowing semantic meaning (rather than lexical items) from another language, very similar to the formation of calques. In this case, however, the complete word in the borrowing language already exists; the change is that its meaning is extended to include another meaning its existing translation has in the lending language. Calques, loanwords and semantic loans are often grouped roughly under the phrase "borrowing". Semantic loans often occur when two languages are in close contact, and takes various forms. The source and target word may be cognates, which may or may not share any contemporary meaning in common; they may be an existing loan translation or parallel construction (compound of corresponding words); or they may be unrelated words that share an existing meaning.Contents1 Examples 2 See also 3 Sources 4 ReferencesExamples[edit] Some examples arise from reborrowing
[...More...]

"Semantic Loan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.