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Woodlawn Jane Doe
Woodlawn Jane Doe
Woodlawn Jane Doe
was a young woman who was discovered murdered on September 12, 1976, in Woodlawn, Baltimore County, Maryland. The victim has been linked to regions in Massachusetts and New York. Various investigations have been conducted in the case.[1] Recent developments have indicated she was possibly a teenage immigrant from Central or South America who had lived in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, although the family of the individual has yet to be located.[2] In 2016, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children released the detail that she may have used the names "Jasmine" or "Jassy" when alive.[3] Despite extensive efforts, her body has never been identified
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Homicide
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract killing Crime
Crime
of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder Felony murder rule Feticide Honor killing Human sacrifice InfanticideChild sacrificeInternet homicide Lonely hearts killer Lust murder Lynching Mass murder Mass shooting Misdemeanor murder Murder–suicide Poisoning Proxy murder Pseudocommando Serial killer Spree killer Thrill killing Torture murder Vehicle-ramming attackManslaughterIn English law Voluntary manslaughter Negligent homicide Vehicular homicideNon-criminal homicide


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Widow's Peak
A widow's peak is a V-shaped point in the hairline in the center of the forehead. Hair growth on the forehead is suppressed in a bilateral pair of periorbital fields. Without a widow's peak, these fields join in the middle of the forehead so as to give a hairline that runs straight across. A widow's peak results when the point of intersection on the forehead of the upper perimeters of these fields is lower than usual.Contents1 Definition 2 Etymology 3 Causes 4 Notable examples 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit]Actor Gary Cooper
Gary Cooper
had a prominent widow's peak.A widow's peak is a distinct point in the hairline in the center of the forehead;[1] there are varying degrees of the peak
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Strangulation
Strangling
Strangling
is compression of the neck that may lead to unconsciousness or death by causing an increasingly hypoxic state in the brain.[1] Fatal strangling typically occurs in cases of violence, accidents, and is one of two main ways that hanging may cause death (alongside breaking the victim's neck). Strangling
Strangling
does not have to be fatal; limited or interrupted strangling is practised in erotic asphyxia, in the choking game, and is an important technique in many combat sports and self-defence systems
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America's Most Wanted
1,186 (as of October 12, 2012[update]) Captures 1,200 (as of October 12, 2012[update])ProductionExecutive producer(s) John Walsh Michael Linder
Michael Linder
(1988–1990) Lance Heflin (1990–2012)Running time30 minutes (1988–1990, 1995–1996), 60 minutes (1990–1995, 1996–2012)Production company(s) 20th Century Fox Television Walsh Productions
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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New York Botanical Garden
www.nybg.orgNew York Botanical GardenU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic Landmark Enid A. Haupt
Enid A. Haupt
ConservatoryLocation Southern and Bedford Park Boulevards Bronx, New York 10458Coordinates 40°51′49″N 73°52′42″W / 40.86361°N 73.87833°W / 40.86361; -73.87833Coordinates: 40°51′49″N 73°52′42″W / 40.86361°N 73.87833°W / 40.86361; -73.87833Area 250 acres (100 ha)Built 1891Architect Lord & Burnham Co.Architectural style Victorian eraNRHP reference # 67000009Significant datesAdded to NRHP May 28, 1967[1]Designated NHL May 28, 1967 [2]The New York Botanical Garden
New York Botanical Garden
(NYBG) is a botanical garden and National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
located in the Bronx, New York City
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New York, New York
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Kerry Babies Case
An infant (from the Latin word infans, meaning "unable to speak" or "speechless") is the more formal or specialised synonym for "baby", the very young offspring of a human. The term may also be used to refer to juveniles of other organisms. A newborn is, in colloquial use, an infant who is only hours, days, or up to one month old. In medical contexts, newborn or neonate (from Latin, neonatus, newborn) refers to an infant in the first 28 days after birth;[1] the term applies to premature, full term, and postmature infants; before birth, the term "fetus" is used. The term "infant" is typically applied to young children between one month and one year of age; however, definitions may vary and may include children up to two years of age. When a human child learns to walk, the term "toddler" may be used instead. In British English, an infant school is for children aged between four and seven
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Forensic Palynology
Forensic palynology
Forensic palynology
is the study of pollen, spores and other acid-resistant microscopic plant bodies, including dinoflagellates, to prove or disprove a relationship between objects, people and places that pertain to both criminal and civil cases. Pollen
Pollen
can tell
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Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Fitchburg is the third largest city in Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 40,318 at the 2010 census
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National Center For Missing & Exploited Children
The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) is a private, non-profit organization established in 1984 by the United States Congress
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Boston, Massachusetts
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Blood Type
A blood type (also called a blood group) is a classification of blood based on the presence and absence of antibodies and also based on the presence or absence of inherited antigenic substances on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs). These antigens may be proteins, carbohydrates, glycoproteins, or glycolipids, depending on the blood group system. Some of these antigens are also present on the surface of other types of cells of various tissues. Several of these red blood cell surface antigens can stem from one allele (or an alternative version of a gene) and collectively form a blood group system.[1] Blood
Blood
types are inherited and represent contributions from both parents
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Inpatient
A patient is any recipient of health care services. The patient is most often ill or injured and in need of treatment by a physician, advanced practice registered nurse, physiotherapist, physician assistant, psychologist, dentist, podiatrist, veterinarian, or other health care provider.Contents1 Etymology 2 Outpatients and inpatients 3 Day patient 4 Alternative terminology 5 Patient-centered healthcare 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The word patient originally meant 'one who suffers'. This English noun comes from the Latin
Latin
word patiens, the present participle of the deponent verb, patior, meaning 'I am suffering,' and akin to the Greek verb πάσχειν (= paskhein, to suffer) and its cognate noun πάθος (= pathos).Outpatients and inpatients[edit] An outpatient (or out-patient) is a patient who is hospitalized for less than 24 hours
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Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia
is a mental disorder characterized by abnormal social behavior and failure to understand reality.[2] Common symptoms include false beliefs, unclear or confused thinking, hearing voices that others do not, reduced social engagement and emotional expression, and a lack of motivation.[2][3] People with schizophrenia often have additional mental health problems such as anxiety, depressive, or substance-use disorders.[11] Symptoms typically come on gradually, begin in yo
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