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Wood Rasp
A rasp is coarse form of file[1] used for coarsely shaping wood or other material. Typically a hand tool, it consists of a generally tapered rectangular, round, or half-round sectioned bar of case hardened steel with distinct, individually cut teeth.[1] A narrow, pointed tang is common at one end, to which a handle may be fitted.[2] Use[edit] Rasps come in a variety of shapes - rectangular, round, and half-round - and vary in coarseness from finest, "cabinet", to most aggressive, "wood".[3] They are used in woodworking for rapidly removing material, and are easier to control than a drawknife. The rough surfaces they leave may be smoothed with finer tools, such as single or double-cut files. Farriers
Farriers
use rasps to remove excess wall from a horse's hoof. Rasps are used in shaping alabaster
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RASP (other)
A rasp is a tool used for shaping wood or other material. Rasp or RASP may also refer to:Ranger Assessment and Selection Program, the United States Army Rangers selection and training RASP computing model, random-access stored-program machine The Rasp, a book by Philip MacDonald Residents Against SARP Pollution Runtime application self-protection Robust Accurate Statistical Parsing (RASP)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title RASP. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Hacksaw
A hacksaw is a fine-toothed saw, originally and mainly made for cutting metal. The equivalent saw for cutting wood is usually called bow saw. Most hacksaws are hand saws with a C-shaped frame that holds a blade under tension. Such hacksaws have a handle, usually a pistol grip, with pins for attaching a narrow disposable blade. The frames may also be adjustable to accommodate blades of different sizes. A screw or other mechanism is used to put the thin blade under tension. On hacksaws, as with most frame saws, the blade can be mounted with the teeth facing toward or away from the handle, resulting in cutting action on either the push or pull stroke
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Diagonal Pliers
Diagonal pliers
Diagonal pliers
(or wire cutters or diagonal cutting pliers or diagonal cutters or side cutting pliers) are pliers intended for the cutting of wire (they are generally not used to grab or turn anything). The plane defined by the cutting edges of the jaws intersects the joint rivet at an angle or "on a diagonal", hence the name.Contents1 Action 2 Jargon 3 Insulation 4 Uses 5 Variations 6 Gallery 7 External linksAction[edit] Instead of using a shearing action as with scissors, diagonal pliers cut by indenting and wedging the wire apart. The jaw edges are ground to a symmetrical "V" shape, thus the two jaws can be visualized to form the letter "X", as seen end-on when fully occluded
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Diamond Blade
A diamond blade is a saw blade which has diamonds fixed on its edge for cutting hard or abrasive materials. There are many types of diamond blade, and they have many uses, including cutting stone, concrete, asphalt, bricks, coal balls, glass, and ceramics in the construction industry; cutting semiconductor materials in the IT industry; and cutting gemstones, including diamonds, in the gem industry.Contents1 Types 2 Manufacturing methods2.1 Electroplating 2.2 Vacuum brazing 2.3 Sintering3 Application of sintered metal-bonded diamond blades 4 Cutting
Cutting
with or without water 5 ReferencesTypes[edit] Diamond
Diamond
blades are available in different shapes:Circular diamond saw blades are the most widely used type of diamond blade. A diamond gang saw blade is a long steel plate with diamond segments welded onto it
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Diamond Tool
A diamond tool is a cutting tool with diamond grains fixed on the functional parts of the tool via a bonding material or another method. As diamond is a superhard material, diamond tools have many advantages as compared with tools made with common abrasives such as corundum and silicon carbide.Contents1 History 2 Advantages2.1 Advantages of diamond grinding tools3 Categories3.1 Categories by manufacturing method 3.2 Categories by use4 Applications4.1 Applicable materials 4.2 Applied domains5 Some examples of diamond tools5.1 Diamond
Diamond
dressing tools 5.2 PCD cutting tools 5.3
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Drill Bit
Drill
Drill
bits are cutting tools used to remove material to create holes, almost always of circular cross-section. Drill
Drill
bits come in many sizes and shapes and can create different kinds of holes in many different materials. In order to create holes drill bits are usually attached to a drill, which powers them to cut through the workpiece, typically by rotation. The drill will grasp the upper end of a bit called the shank in the chuck. Drill
Drill
bits come in standard sizes, described in the drill bit sizes article
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Emery Cloth
Emery cloth
Emery cloth
is a type of coated abrasive that has emery glued to a cloth backing. It is used for hand metalworking. It may be sold in sheets or in narrow rolls, typically 25 or 50 mm wide, often described as "emery tape". The cloth backing makes emery cloth stronger in tension than sandpaper, but still allows a sheet to be conveniently torn to size. Emery paper, more commonly seen, has a paper backing and is usually a finer grit. Emery was considered a suitable abrasive for fitting work and the final adjustment of steel parts for a perfect fit. It had the advantage that, unlike harder abrasives, it was not considered to embed abrasive traces in the polished components afterwards
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Fretsaw
The fretsaw is a bow saw used for intricate cutting work which often incorporates tight curves. Although the coping saw is often used for similar work, the fretsaw is capable of much tighter radii and more delicate work. It has a distinctive appearance due to the depth of its frame (typically between 10 and 20 inches), which together with the relatively short five inch blade makes this tool appear somewhat out of proportion compared with most other saws. Compared with the coping saw it has much shallower blades, which are usually extra-fine, up to 32 teeth per inch (tpi). This allows much tighter curves to be cut—with many blades even sharp corners are possible—but the blades are also much more fragile compared with that of a coping saw. Unlike the coping saw, the blade has a fixed orientation in relation to the frame
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Froe
A froe (or frow), shake axe or paling knife is a tool for cleaving wood by splitting it along the grain. It is an L-shaped tool, used by hammering one edge of its blade into the end of a piece of wood in the direction of the grain, then twisting the blade in the wood by rotating the haft (handle). A froe uses the haft as a lever to multiply the force upon the blade, allowing wood to be torn apart with remarkably little force applied to the haft
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Glass Cutter
A glass cutter is a tool used to make a shallow score in one surface of a piece of glass that is to be broken in two pieces. The scoring makes a split in the surface of the glass which encourages the glass to break along the score.[1] Regular, annealed glass can be broken apart this way but not tempered glass as the latter tends to shatter rather than breaking cleanly into two pieces.[2] A glass cutter may use a diamond to create the split, but more commonly a small cutting wheel made of hardened steel or tungsten carbide 4–6 mm in diameter with a V-shaped profile called a "hone angle" is used. The greater the hone angle of the wheel, the sharper the angle of the V and the thicker the piece of glass it is designed to cut
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Grater
A box grater with multiple grating surfacesBox grater with vegetable slicing surface displayedA grater (also known as a shredder) is a kitchen utensil used to grate foods into fine pieces. It was invented by François Boullier in the 1540s, originally to grate cheese.Contents1 Uses1.1 Food preparation 1.2 In music2 History 3 Variants 4 Images 5 In popular culture 6 See also 7 ReferencesUses[edit] Food preparation[edit]A cheese grater Cheese
Cheese
graterSeveral types of graters feature different sizes of grating slots, and can therefore aid in the preparation of a variety of foods. They are commonly used to grate cheese and lemon or orange peel (to create zest), and can also be used to grate other soft foods
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Grinding Wheel
A grinding wheel is a wheel composed of an abrasive compound and used for various grinding (abrasive cutting) and abrasive machining operations. Such wheels are used in grinding machines. The wheels are generally made from a composite material consisting of coarse-particle aggregate pressed and bonded together by a cementing matrix (called the bond in grinding wheel terminology) to form a solid, circular shape. Various profiles and cross sections are available depending on the intended usage for the wheel. They may also be made from a solid steel or aluminium disc with particles bonded to the surface
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Hand Saw
In woodworking and carpentry, hand saws, also known as "panel saws", "fish saws", are used to cut pieces of wood into different shapes. This is usually done in order to join the pieces together and carve a wooden object. They usually operate by having a series of sharp points of some substance that is harder than the wood being cut. The hand saw is a bit like a tenon saw, but with one flat, sharp edge. Handsaws have been around for thousands of years. Egyptian hieroglyphics exist depicting ancient woodworkers sawing boards into pieces. Ancient bow saws have been found in Japan. The cut patterns on ancient boards may be observed sometimes to bear the unique cutting marks left by saw blades, particularly if the wood was not 'smoothed up' by some method. As for preservation of handsaws, twenty-four saws from eighteenth-century England are known to survive.[1] Materials for saw blades have varied over the ages
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Countersink
A countersink (symbol: ⌵) is a conical hole cut into a manufactured object, or the cutter used to cut such a hole. A common use is to allow the head of a countersunk bolt or screw, when placed in the hole, to sit flush with or below the surface of the surrounding material (by comparison, a counterbore makes a flat-bottomed hole that might be used with a socket-head capscrew). A countersink may also be used to remove the burr left from a drilling or tapping operation thereby improving the finish of the product and removing any hazardous sharp edges. The basic geometry of a countersink (cutter) inherently can be applied to the plunging applications described above (axial feed only) and also to other milling applications (sideways traversal). Therefore, countersinks overlap in form, function, and sometimes name with chamfering endmills (endmills with angled tips)
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Hole Saw
A hole saw (also styled holesaw), also known as a hole cutter,[1] is a saw blade of annular (ring) shape, whose annular kerf creates a hole in the workpiece without having to cut up the core material. It is used in a drill. Hole saws typically have a pilot drill bit at their center to keep the saw teeth from walking. The fact that a hole saw creates the hole without needing to cut up the core often makes it preferable to twist drills or spade drills for relatively large holes (especially those larger than 25 millimetres (1.0 inch)). The same hole can be made faster and using less power. The depth to which a hole saw can cut is limited by the depth of its cup-like shape. Most hole saws have a fairly short aspect ratio of diameter to depth, and they are used to cut through relatively thin workpieces
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