HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Wonder Woman
Wonder Woman
Wonder Woman
is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics.[2] The character is a founding member of the Justice League, a goddess, and Ambassador-at-Large of the Amazon people. The character first appeared in All Star Comics
All Star Comics
#8 in December 1941 and first cover-dated on Sensation Comics
Sensation Comics
#1, January 1942. In her homeland, the island nation of Themyscira, her official title is Princess Diana of Themyscira, Daughter of Hippolyta. When blending into the society outside of her homeland, she adopts her civilian identity Diana Prince
[...More...]

"Wonder Woman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Psychologist
A psychologist studies normal and abnormal mental states from cognitive, emotional, and social processes and behavior by observing, interpreting, and recording how individuals relate to one another and to their environments.[1] To become a psychologist, a person often completes a graduate university degree in psychology, but in most jurisdictions, members of other behavioral professions (such as counselors and psychiatrists) can also evaluate, diagnose, treat, and study mental processes.[2]Contents1 Professional practice1.1 Clinical psychologists 1.2 Contrasted with psychiatrists2 Licensing and regulations2.1 Australia 2.2 Belgium 2.3 Finland 2.4 Germany 2.5 Greece 2.6 The Netherlands 2.7 New Zealand 2.8 South Africa 2.9 Sweden 2.10 United Kingdom2.10.1 Employment2.11 United States and Canada2.11.1 Regulation 2.11.2 Schooling 2.11.3 Licensure 2.11.4 Employment3 See also 4 References 5 External linksProfessional pract
[...More...]

"Psychologist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Demigod
The term demigod or demi-god can refer to a minor deity, a mortal or immortal who is the offspring of a god and a human, or a figure who has attained divine status after death.Contents1 Etymology 2 Classical 3 Modern use 4 Hinduism 5 China 6 See also 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The English term "demigod" is a calque of the Latin semideus, "half-god",[1] which was probably coined by the Roman poet Ovid
Ovid
in reference to less important gods, such as dryads.[2] Classical[edit] In the ancient Greek and Roman world, the word did not have a consistent definition and was rarely used.[3][4] The earliest recorded use of the term is by the archaic Greek poets Homer
Homer
and Hesiod. Both describe dead heroes as hemitheoi, or "half gods"
[...More...]

"Demigod" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Creation Of Man From Clay
The "creation of man from clay" is a miraculous birth theme that recurs throughout world religions and mythologies. Examples include:According to Sumerian mythology the gods Enki or Enlil create a servant of the gods, humankind, out of clay and blood (see Enki and the Making of Man). In another Sumerian story, both Enki and Ninmah create humans from the clay of the Abzu, the fresh water of the underground
[...More...]

"Creation Of Man From Clay" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ambassador-at-large
An ambassador-at-large is a diplomat of the highest rank or a minister who is accredited to represent his country and people internationally. Unlike an ambassador-in-residence who is usually limited to a country or embassy, the ambassador-at-large is entrusted to operate in several usually neighboring countries, a region or sometimes hold a seat in an international organization like the United Nations
United Nations
and the European Union. In some cases an ambassador-at-large may even be specifically assigned a role to advise and assist the state or a government in particular issues
[...More...]

"Ambassador-at-large" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

God
In monotheistic thought, God
God
is conceived of as the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
and the principal object of faith.[3] The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. In agnostic thought, the existence of God
God
is unknown and/or unknowable
[...More...]

"God" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(/æfrəˈdaɪti/ ( listen) af-rə-DY-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη Aphrodítē) is the ancient Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans. The cult of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was largely derived from that of the Phoenician goddess Astarte, a cognate of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar, whose cult was based on the Sumerian cult of Inanna. Aphrodite's main cult centers were Cythera, Cyprus, Corinth, and Athens. Her main festival was the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated annually in midsummer. In Laconia, Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was worshipped as a warrior goddess
[...More...]

"Aphrodite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Greek Pantheon
Greek mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] Greek mythology has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language. Poets and artists from ancient times to the present have derived inspiration from Greek mythology and have discovered contemporary significance and relevance in the themes.[2]Achilles and Penthesileia by Exekias, c
[...More...]

"Greek Pantheon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Zeus
Zeus
Zeus
(/zjuːs/;[3] Greek: Ζεύς Zeús [zdeǔ̯s])[4] is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus. His name is cognate with the first element of his Roman equivalent Jupiter. His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical, to those of Indo-European deities such as Indra, Jupiter, Perkūnas, Perun, Thor, and Odin.[5][6][7] Zeus
Zeus
is the child of Cronus
Cronus
and Rhea, the youngest of his siblings to be born, though sometimes reckoned the eldest as the others required disgorging from Cronus's stomach. In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe, and Hephaestus.[8] At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad
Iliad
states that he fathered Aphrodite.[11] Zeus was also infamous for his erotic escapades
[...More...]

"Zeus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Feminists
Feminism
Feminism
is a range of political movements, ideologies, and social movements that share a common goal: to define, establish, and achieve political, economic, personal, and social equality of sexes.[1][2] This includes seeking to establish educational and professional opportunities for women that are equal to those for men. Feminist movements have campaigned and continue to campaign for women's rights, including the right to vote, to hold public office, to work, to earn fair wages or equal pay, to own property, to receive education, to enter contracts, to have equal rights within marriage, and to have maternity leave
[...More...]

"Feminists" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pen Name
A pen name (nom de plume, or literary double) is a pseudonym (or, in some cases, a variant form of a real name) adopted by an author and printed on the title page or by-line of their works in place of their "real" name. A pen name may be used to make the author's name more distinctive, to disguise their gender, to distance an author from some or all of their previous works, to protect the author from retribution for their writings, to combine more than one author into a single author, or for any of a number of reasons related to the marketing or aesthetic presentation of the work
[...More...]

"Pen Name" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Writer
A writer is a person who uses written words in various styles and techniques to communicate their ideas. Writers produce various forms of literary art and creative writing such as novels, short stories, poetry, plays, screenplays, and essays as well as various reports and news articles that may be of interest to the public. Writers' texts are published across a range of media. Skilled writers who are able to use language to express ideas well often contribute significantly to the cultural content of a society.[1] The term "writer" is also used elsewhere in the arts – such as songwriter – but as a standalone "writer" normally refers to the creation of written language. Some writers work from an oral tradition. Writers can produce material across a number of genres, fictional or non-fictional. Other writers use multiple media – for example, graphics or illustration – to enhance the communication of their ideas
[...More...]

"Writer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tiara
A tiara (from Latin: tiara, from Ancient Greek: τιάρα) is a jeweled, ornamental crown traditionally worn by women. It is worn during formal occasions, particularly if the dress code is white tie.[2]Contents1 History 2 Late 18th century-present 3 Costume jewellery tiaras3.1 Stage and screen4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]This Fayum mummy portrait shows a woman wearing a golden wreath, c. AD 100-110.Today, the word "tiara" is often used interchangeably with the word "diadem", and tiara is often translated to a word similar to diadem in other languages.[3] Both words come from head ornaments worn by ancient men and women to denote high status. As Geoffrey Munn
Geoffrey Munn
notes, "The word 'tiara' is actually Persian in origin — the name first denoted the high-peaked head-dresses of Persian kings, which were encircled by 'diadems' (bands of purple and white decoration)
[...More...]

"Tiara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Axis Powers
The Axis powers
Axis powers
(German: Achsenmächte, Italian: Potenze dell'Asse, Japanese: 枢軸国 Sūjikukoku), also known as the Axis and the Rome–Berlin–Tokyo Axis, were the nations that fought in World War II against the Allied forces. The Axis powers
Axis powers
agreed on their opposition to the Allies, but did not completely coordinate their activity. The Axis grew out of the diplomatic efforts of Germany, Italy, and Japan to secure their own specific expansionist interests in the mid-1930s. The first step was the treaty signed by Germany and Italy in October 1936
[...More...]

"Axis Powers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Supervillain
A supervillain is a variant of the villainous stock character that is commonly found in American comic books, usually possessing superhuman abilities. A supervillain is the antithesis of a superhero. A female supervillain is sometimes called a supervillainess, although the word supervillain is commonly used for females also. Supervillains are often used as foils to present a daunting challenge to a superhero. In instances where the supervillain does not have superhuman, mystical, or alien powers, the supervillain may possess a genius intellect or a skill set that allows them to draft complex schemes or commit crimes in a way normal humans cannot. Other traits may include megalomania and possession of considerable resources to further their aims
[...More...]

"Supervillain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.