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Wired (website)
Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993.[2] Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany. In its earliest colophons, Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan
as its "patron saint." From its beginning, the strongest influence on the magazine's editorial outlook came from techno-utopian cofounder Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
and his associate Kevin Kelly.[3] From 1998 to 2006, Wired magazine
Wired magazine
and Wired News
Wired News
(which publishes at Wired.com) had separate owners
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Nicholas Thompson (editor)
Nicholas Thompson is an American journalist and editor, currently the editor-in-chief of Wired Magazine.[1] Before that, Thompson was a journalist at The New Yorker
The New Yorker
magazine, where he was the editor of newyorker.com.[2] Previously, he was a senior editor at the magazine. He gave an interview in November 2015, where he said that the main strategy the website had for growing traffic was to put more time into editing better stories. "“The most encouraging thing we found is that the stories we’re prouder of, the stories we put more effort into, attract more readers," he said. He is also a contributor for CBS News and a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Thompson is the author of The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War
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Macworld
Macworld
Macworld
is a web site dedicated to products and software of Apple Inc., published by Mac Publishing, which is headquartered in San Francisco, California. It started life as a print magazine in 1984 and had the largest audited circulation (both total and newsstand) of Macintosh-focused magazines in North America, more than double its nearest competitor, MacLife
MacLife
(formerly MacAddict). Macworld
Macworld
was founded by David Bunnell
David Bunnell
(publisher) and Andrew Fluegelman (editor)
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Crowdsourcing
Crowdsourcing is a sourcing model in which individuals or organizations obtain goods and services, including ideas and finances, from a large, relatively open and often rapidly-evolving group of internet users; it divides work between participants to achieve a cumulative result. The word crowdsourcing itself is a portmanteau of crowd and outsourcing, and was coined in 2005.[1][2][3][4] As a mode of sourcing, crowdsourcing existed prior to the digital age (i.e. "offline").[5] Major differences between crowdsourcing and outsourcing include features such as: crowdsourcing comes from a less-specific, more public group (i.e
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Vaporware
In the computer industry, vaporware (Brit. vapourware) is a product, typically computer hardware or software, that is announced to the general public but is never actually manufactured nor officially cancelled. Use of the word has broadened to include products such as automobiles. Vaporware
Vaporware
is often announced months or years before its purported release, with few details about its development being released. Developers have been accused of intentionally promoting vaporware to keep customers from switching to competing products that offer more features.[1] Network World
Network World
magazine called vaporware an "epidemic" in 1989, and blamed the press for not investigating whether developers' claims were true. Seven major companies issued a report in 1990 saying they felt vaporware had hurt the industry's credibility
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Jane Metcalfe
Jane Metcalfe
Jane Metcalfe
is the co-founder, with Louis Rossetto, and former president of Wired Ventures, creator and original publisher of the magazine Wired. Prior to that, Metcalfe managed advertising sales for the Amsterdam-based Electric Word magazine. Career[edit] In 1994 Metcalfe was elected to the board of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Metcalfe was on the 2004 and 2005 Digital Communities jury of Prix Ars Electronica. In 2015 Metcalfe and Rossetto were awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award at The 19th Annual Webby Awards.[2] Metcalfe is a partner, along with Rossetto, in Força da Imaginaçao, an independent investment concern with interests in technology, media, and real estate. She is also a board member at One Economy Corporation, which maximizes the potential of technology to help low-income people improve their lives and join the economic mainstream
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Ian Charles Stewart
Ian Charles Stewart is an entrepreneur, and the co-founder of Wired magazine[1][2] and Artworld Salon. Interested in the financial aspects of international art, he has an MBA from the International Institute for Management Development.[3] He has lived in Beijing, China since 2006 and is currently the Chairman of Khunu[citation needed] and the Chairman of Wheels Plus Wings,[4] a social venture focused on helping children with physical disabilities. He was previously the Executive Chairman of The PAE Group.[citation needed]Contents1 Athletic career 2 Photography 3 References 4 External linksAthletic career[edit] He was a member of the New Zealand
New Zealand
Olympic volleyball team
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Charlie Jackson (software)
Charlie Jackson is an American computer software entrepreneur who founded Silicon Beach Software in 1984 and co-founded FutureWave Software in 1993. FutureWave created the first version of what is now Adobe Flash. He was an early investor in Wired magazine, Outpost.com, Streamload
Streamload
and Angelic Pictures. Jackson is currently in startup mode again, developing application software for Windows 10.Contents1 Business Life1.1 Startups 1.2 Investments 1.3 Current Ventures2 Early life and education 3 Sports 4 References 5 External linksBusiness Life[edit] Startups[edit] Jackson founded Silicon Beach Software in 1984. The company developed and published Macintosh software. It was best known for its graphics editors SuperPaint, Digital Darkroom and the multimedia authoring application SuperCard. Silicon Beach was acquired by Aldus Corporation in 1990
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Nicholas Negroponte
Nicholas Negroponte
Nicholas Negroponte
(born December 1, 1943) is a Greek American architect. He is the founder and Chairman Emeritus of Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab, and also founded the One Laptop per Child Association (OLPC).Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 MIT 2.2 Wired3 Later career 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Negroponte was born to Dimitri John (el) (Greek: Νεγροπόντης), a Greek shipping magnate, and grew up in New York City's Upper East Side. He is the younger brother of John Negroponte, former United States Deputy Secretary of State
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MIT Media Lab
The MIT Media Lab
MIT Media Lab
is an interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, growing out of MIT's Architecture Machine Group in the School of Architecture. Its research draws from technology, media, science, art and design.[3] As of 2014, research groups included neurobiology,[4] biologically inspired fabrication,[5] socially engaging robots,[6] emotive computing,[7] bionics,[8] and hyperinstruments.[9] The Lab has been written about in the popular press since 1988, when Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
published "The Media Lab: Inventing the Future at M.I.T.", and its work was a regular feature of technology journals in the 1990s. The Media Lab was founded in 1985 by Nicholas Negroponte
Nicholas Negroponte
and former MIT President Jerome Wiesner
Jerome Wiesner
and opened its doors in the Wiesner Building (designed by I. M
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Being Digital
Being Digital[1] is a non-fiction book about digital technologies and their possible future by technology author Nicholas Negroponte. It was originally published in January 1995 by Alfred A. Knopf. Being Digital
Being Digital
provides a general history of several digital media technologies, many that Negroponte himself was directly involved in developing. Negroponte analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of the technologies (such as his belief that high-definition television wastes broadcasting power), and tries to predict how the technologies will evolve. Negroponte presents a strong belief that humanity is inevitably headed towards a future where everything that can will be digitalized (be it newspapers, entertainment, or sex)
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Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
is an American biweekly magazine that focuses on popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco in 1967 by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine's publisher, and the music critic Ralph J. Gleason. It was first known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson
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National Magazine Awards
The National Magazine
Magazine
Awards, also known as the Ellie Awards, honor print and digital publications that consistently demonstrate superior execution of editorial objectives, innovative techniques, noteworthy enterprise and imaginative design. Originally limited to print magazines, the awards now recognize magazine-quality journalism published in any medium. They are sponsored by the American Society of Magazine
Magazine
Editors in association with Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and are administered by ASME in New York City, New York. The awards have been presented annually since 1966.[1] The Ellie Awards are judged by magazine journalists and journalism educators selected by the administrators of the awards. More than 300 judges participate every year. Each judge is assigned to a judging group that averages 15 judges, including a judging leader
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Long Tail
In statistics and business, a long tail of some distributions of numbers is the portion of the distribution having a large number of occurrences far from the "head" or central part of the distribution. The distribution could involve popularities, random numbers of occurrences of events with various probabilities, etc.[1] The term is often used loosely, with no definition or arbitrary definition, but precise definitions are possible. In statistics, the term long-tailed distribution has a narrow technical meaning, and is a subtype of heavy-tailed distribution.[2][3][4] Intuitively, a distribution is (right) long-tailed if, for any fixed amount, when a quantity exceeds a high level, it almost certainly exceeds it by at least that amount: large quantities are probably even larger.[a] Note that there is no sense of the "long tail" of a distribution, but only the property of a distribution being long-tailed. In business, the term long tail is applied to rank-size distributions or rank-freque
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Whole Earth Catalog
The Whole Earth
Earth
Catalog (WEC) was an American counterculture magazine and product catalog published by Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
several times a year between 1968 and 1972, and occasionally thereafter, until 1998. The magazine featured essays and articles, but was primarily focused on product reviews. The editorial focus was on self-sufficiency, ecology, alternative education, "do it yourself" (DIY), and holism, and featured the slogan "access to tools". While WEC listed and reviewed a wide range of products (clothing, books, tools, machines, seeds, etc.), it did not sell any of the products directly. Instead, the vendor's contact information was listed alongside the item and its review
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Whole Earth Review
Whole Earth Review (Whole Earth after 1997)[1] was a magazine which was founded in January 1985 after the merger of the Whole Earth Software Review (a supplement to the Whole Earth Software Catalog) and the CoEvolution Quarterly. All of these periodicals are descendants of Stewart Brand's Whole Earth Catalog. The last published hard copy issue of the magazine was the Winter 2002 issue.[2] The next issue (Spring, 2003) was planned but never published in hard copy format
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