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Wired (magazine)
Wired is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993.[2] Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany. Condé Nast's parent company Advance Publications
Advance Publications
is also the major shareholder of Reddit, an internet information conglomeration website.[3] In its earliest colophons, Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan
as its "patron saint"
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Ziff Davis
Ziff Davis, LLC is an American publisher and Internet company. It was founded in 1927 in Chicago, Illinois, by William B. Ziff, Sr. and Bernard G. Davis.Contents1 History1.1 Popular Aviation 1.2 Fiction and hobbyist magazines 1.3 Television stations 1.4 Technology magazines and web properties 1.5 Ziff Davis Media
Ziff Davis Media
Inc. 1.6 Acquisition 1.7 International growth2 Current properties 3 Sold properties 4 Discontinued magazines and websites 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] Throughout most of Ziff Davis' history, it was a publisher of hobbyist magazines, often ones devoted to expensive, advertiser-rich technical hobbies such as cars, photography, and electronics
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Politics
Politics
Politics
(from Greek: πολιτικά, translit. Politiká, meaning "affairs of the cities") is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group.[1] It refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance—organized control over a human community, particularly a state.[2] In modern nation states, people have formed political parties to represent their ideas. They agree to take the same position on many issues, and agree to support the same changes to law and the same leaders.[3] An election is usually a competition between different parties.[4] Some examples of political parties are the African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa, the Tories
Tories
in Great Britain
Great Britain
and the Indian National Congress. Politics
Politics
is a multifaceted word
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Being Digital
Being Digital[1] is a non-fiction book about digital technologies and their possible future by technology author Nicholas Negroponte. It was originally published in January 1995 by Alfred A. Knopf. Being Digital
Being Digital
provides a general history of several digital media technologies, many that Negroponte himself was directly involved in developing. Negroponte analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of the technologies (such as his belief that high-definition television wastes broadcasting power), and tries to predict how the technologies will evolve. Negroponte presents a strong belief that humanity is inevitably headed towards a future where everything that can will be digitalized (be it newspapers, entertainment, or sex)
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MIT Media Lab
The MIT Media Lab
MIT Media Lab
is an interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, growing out of MIT's Architecture Machine Group in the School of Architecture. Its research draws from technology, media, science, art and design.[3] As of 2014, research groups included neurobiology,[4] biologically inspired fabrication,[5] socially engaging robots,[6] emotive computing,[7] bionics,[8] and hyperinstruments.[9] The Lab has been written about in the popular press since 1988, when Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
published "The Media Lab: Inventing the Future at M.I.T.", and its work was a regular feature of technology journals in the 1990s. The Media Lab was founded in 1985 by Nicholas Negroponte
Nicholas Negroponte
and former MIT President Jerome Wiesner
Jerome Wiesner
and opened its doors in the Wiesner Building (designed by I. M
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Whole Earth Catalog
The Whole Earth
Earth
Catalog (WEC) was an American counterculture magazine and product catalog published by Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
several times a year between 1968 and 1972, and occasionally thereafter, until 1998. The magazine featured essays and articles, but was primarily focused on product reviews. The editorial focus was on self-sufficiency, ecology, alternative education, "do it yourself" (DIY), and holism, and featured the slogan "access to tools". While WEC listed and reviewed a wide range of products (clothing, books, tools, machines, seeds, etc.), it did not sell any of the products directly. Instead, the vendor's contact information was listed alongside the item and its review
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Whole Earth Review
Whole Earth Review (Whole Earth after 1997)[1] was a magazine which was founded in January 1985 after the merger of the Whole Earth Software Review (a supplement to the Whole Earth Software Catalog) and the CoEvolution Quarterly. All of these periodicals are descendants of Stewart Brand's Whole Earth Catalog. The last published hard copy issue of the magazine was the Winter 2002 issue.[2] The next issue (Spring, 2003) was planned but never published in hard copy format
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The WELL
The Whole Earth 'Lectronic Link, normally shortened to The WELL, is one of the oldest virtual communities in continuous operation. As of June 2012, it had 2,693 members.[2] It is best known for its Internet forums, but also provides email, shell accounts, and web pages. The discussion and topics on The WELL range from deeply serious to trivial, depending on the nature and interests of the participants.[3]Contents1 History 2 Topics of discussion 3 Policy and governance 4 Joining and reading 5 Journalists 6 In the news 7 Publications about The WELL 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The WELL was started by Stewart Brand
Stewart Brand
and Larry Brilliant
Larry Brilliant
in 1985, and the name (an acronym for Whole Earth 'Lectronic Link)[4] is partially a reference to some of Brand's earlier projects, including the Whole Earth Catalog
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Clay Shirky
Clay Shirky
Clay Shirky
(born 1964[2]) is an American writer, consultant and teacher on the social and economic effects of Internet
Internet
technologies and journalism. He has a joint appointment at New York University
New York University
(NYU) as a Distinguished Writer in Residence at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute and Assistant Arts Professor in the New Media
New Media
focused graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program
Interactive Telecommunications Program
(ITP).[3] His courses address, among other things, the interrelated effects of the topology of social networks and technological networks, how our networks shape culture and vice versa.[4] He has written and been interviewed about the Internet
Internet
since 1996
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Otaku
Otaku
Otaku
(おたく/オタク) is a Japanese term for people with obsessive interests, commonly the anime and manga fandom. Its contemporary usage originated with Akio Nakamori's 1983 essay in Manga Burikko.[1][2] Otaku
Otaku
may be used as a pejorative; its negativity stems from the stereotypical view of otaku and the media's reporting on Tsutomu Miyazaki, "The Otaku
Otaku
Murderer", in 1989. According to studies published in 2013, the term has become less negative, and an increasing number of people now self-identify as otaku,[3] both in Japan and elsewhere. Otaku
Otaku
subculture is a central theme of various anime and manga works, documentaries and academic research. The subculture began in the 1980s as changing social mentalities and the nurturing of otaku traits by Japanese schools combined with the resignation of such individuals to become social outcasts
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Bozo Filter
Email
Email
filtering is the processing of email to organize it according to specified criteria. Most often this refers to the automatic processing of incoming messages, but the term also applies to the intervention of human intelligence in addition to anti-spam techniques, and to outgoing emails as well as those being received. Email
Email
filtering software inputs email. For its output, it might pass the message through unchanged for delivery to the user's mailbox, redirect the message for delivery elsewhere, or even throw the message away. Some mail filters are able to edit messages during processing.Contents1 Motivation 2 Methods 3 Inbound and Outbound Filtering 4 Customization 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMotivation[edit] Common uses for mail filters include organizing incoming email and removal of spam and computer viruses
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Usenet Newsgroup
A Usenet
Usenet
newsgroup is a repository usually within the Usenet
Usenet
system, for messages posted from many users in different locations using Internet. (Despite the name, newsgroups are discussion groups. They are not devoted to publishing news, although they had been so intended when the internet was young.)[vague] Newsgroups are technically distinct from, but functionally similar to, discussion forums on the World Wide Web. Newsreader software is used to read the content of newsgroups. Before the uptake[vague] of the World Wide Web, Usenet
Usenet
newsgroups were among the most popular Internet
Internet
services, and have retained their noncommercial nature in contrast to the increasingly ad-laden web
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Technological Utopianism
Technological utopianism (often called techno-utopian-ism or technoutopianism) is any ideology based on the premise that advances in science and technology could and should bring about a utopia, or at least help to fulfill one or another utopian ideal. A techno-utopia is therefore an ideal society, in which laws, government, and social conditions are solely operating for the benefit and well-being of all its citizens, set in the near- or far-future, as advanced science and technology will allow these ideal living standards to exist; for example, post-scarcity, transformations in human nature, the avoidance or prevention of suffering and even the end of death
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Patron Saint
A patron saint, patroness saint, patron hallow or heavenly protector is a saint who in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, Eastern Orthodoxy, or particular branches of Islam, is regarded as the heavenly advocate of a nation, place, craft, activity, class, clan, family or person.[1][2][title missing][page needed] Catholics believe that patron saints, having already transcended to the metaphysical, are able to intercede effectively for the needs of their special charges.[3] Historically, a similar practice has also occurred in many Islamic lands
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Colophon (publishing)
In publishing, a colophon is a brief statement containing information about the publication of a book such as the place of publication, the publisher, and the date of publication. A colophon may also be emblematic or pictorial in nature. Colophons were formerly printed at the ends of books, but in modern works they are usually located at the verso of the title-leaf.Contents1 History 2 Printed books 3 Websites 4 See also 5 References 6 SourcesHistory[edit]Clay tablet: dictionary with colophon indicating storage emplacement in a library. From Warka, ancient Uruk, mid 1st century BC. On display at the Louvre.The term colophon derives from the Late Latin
Late Latin
colophōn, from the Greek κολοφών (meaning "summit" or "finishing touch").[1] It should not be confused with Colophon, an ancient city in Asia Minor, after which "colophony", or rosin (ronnel), is named. The existence of colophons can be dated back to antiquity
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Macworld
Macworld
Macworld
is a web site dedicated to products and software of Apple Inc., published by Mac Publishing, which is headquartered in San Francisco, California. It started life as a print magazine in 1984 and had the largest audited circulation (both total and newsstand) of Macintosh-focused magazines in North America, more than double its nearest competitor, MacLife
MacLife
(formerly MacAddict). Macworld
Macworld
was founded by David Bunnell
David Bunnell
(publisher) and Andrew Fluegelman (editor)
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