HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Windows Me
Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows ME
Windows ME
(marketed with the pronunciation of the pronoun "me",[5] but commonly pronounced as an initialism, "M-E"), is a graphical operating system from Microsoft released to manufacturing in June 2000, and launched in September 2000. It was the last operating system released in the Windows 9x series. Windows ME
Windows ME
was the successor to Windows 98
Windows 98
and was targeted specifically at home PC users.[6] It included Internet Explorer 5.5, Windows Media Player
Windows Media Player
7, and the new Windows Movie Maker
Windows Movie Maker
software, which provided basic video editing and was designed to be easy to use for home users
[...More...]

"Windows Me" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Windows Image Acquisition
Windows Image Acquisition (WIA; sometimes also called Windows Imaging Architecture) is a proprietary Microsoft
Microsoft
driver model and application programming interface (API) for Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows Me
Windows Me
and later Windows operating systems that enables graphics software to communicate with imaging hardware such as scanners, digital cameras and Digital Video-equipment. It was first introduced in 2000 as part of Windows Me, and continues to be the standard imaging device and API model through successive Windows versions
[...More...]

"Windows Image Acquisition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Microsoft Developer Network
Microsoft
Microsoft
Developer Network (MSDN) is the portion of Microsoft responsible for managing the firm's relationship with developers and testers, such as hardware developers interested in the operating system (OS), and software developers developing on the various OS platforms or using the API or scripting languages of Microsoft's applications. The relationship management is situated in assorted media: web sites, newsletters, developer conferences, trade media, blogs and DVD
DVD
distribution
[...More...]

"Microsoft Developer Network" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Beta Version
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
[...More...]

"Beta Version" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Booting
In computing, booting (or booting up) is the initialization of a computerized system. The system can be a computer or a computer appliance. The booting process can be "hard", e.g., after electrical power to the CPU is switched from off to on (in order to diagnose particular hardware errors), or "soft", when those power-on self-tests (POST) can be avoided. On some systems a soft boot may optionally clear RAM
RAM
to zero. Both hard and soft booting can be initiated by hardware such as a button press, or by software command. Booting
Booting
is complete when the normal, operative, runtime environment is attained. A boot loader is a computer program that loads an operating system or some other system software for the computer after completion of the power-on self-tests; it is the loader for the operating system itself. Within the hard reboot process, it runs after completion of the self-tests, then loads and runs the software
[...More...]

"Booting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Start Menu
The Start menu
Start menu
is a user interface element used in Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows since Windows 95
Windows 95
and in some other operating systems. It provides a central launching point for computer programs and performing other tasks. It has different names in different operating systems and window managers, such as Kickoff Application Launcher in KDE, Dash in GNOME
GNOME
and Unity, and Start screen in Windows 8. Traditionally, the Start menu
Start menu
provided a customizable nested list of programs for the user to launch, as well as a list of most recently opened documents, a way to find files and get help, and access to the system settings. Later enhancements via Windows Desktop Update included access to special folders like "My Documents" and "Favorites" (browser bookmarks)
[...More...]

"Start Menu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
[...More...]

"Software Developer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Microsoft Office
Microsoft
Microsoft
Office is a family of client software, server software, and services developed by Microsoft. It was first announced by Bill Gates on 1 August 1988, at COMDEX in Las Vegas. Initially a marketing term for an office suite (bundled set of productivity applications), the first version of Office contained Microsoft
Microsoft
Word, Microsoft
Microsoft
Excel, and Microsoft
Microsoft
PowerPoint. Over the years, Office applications have grown substantially closer with shared features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. Microsoft
Microsoft
also positions Office as a development platform for line-of-business software under the Office Business Applications brand
[...More...]

"Microsoft Office" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Special Folder
On Microsoft Windows, a special folder is a folder which is presented to the user through an interface as an abstract concept instead of an absolute folder path. (The synonymous term shell folder is sometimes used instead.) Special folders make it possible for any application to ask the operating system where an appropriate location for certain kinds of files can be found; independently of which version or user language of Windows is being used. In Windows Server 2003 and earlier, a folder like the "Start Menu" had a different name on non-English versions of Windows. For example, on German versions of Windows XP it is "Startmenü". However, starting with Windows Vista, all versions of Windows use the same English named folders and only display different names in the Windows Explorer
[...More...]

"Special Folder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

.NET Framework
.NET Framework
.NET Framework
(pronounced dot net) is a software framework developed by Microsoft
Microsoft
that runs primarily on Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows. It includes a large class library named Framework Class Library (FCL) and provides language interoperability (each language can use code written in other languages) across several programming languages. Programs written for .NET Framework
.NET Framework
execute in a software environment (in contrast to a hardware environment) named Common Language Runtime
Common Language Runtime
(CLR), an application virtual machine that provides services such as security, memory management, and exception handling
[...More...]

".NET Framework" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Outlook Express
Outlook Express, formerly known as Microsoft
Microsoft
Internet Mail and News, is a discontinued email and news client included with Internet Explorer versions 3.0 through to 6.0. As such, it was bundled with several versions of Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows, from Windows 98
Windows 98
to Windows Server 2003, and was available for Windows 3.x, Windows NT 3.51, Windows 95, Mac System 7, Mac OS 8, and Mac OS 9. In Windows Vista, Outlook Express
Outlook Express
was superseded by Windows Mail. In macOS, Outlook Express was superseded by Apple Mail. Outlook Express
Outlook Express
is a different application from Microsoft
Microsoft
Outlook
[...More...]

"Outlook Express" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hard Reboot
In computing, rebooting is the process by which a running computer system is restarted, either intentionally or unintentionally. Reboots can be either cold (alternatively known as hard) where the power to the system is physically turned off and back on again, causing an initial boot of the machine, or warm (alternatively known as soft) where the system restarts without the need to interrupt the power. The term restart is used to refer to a reboot when the operating system closes all programs and finalizes all pending input and output operations before initiating a soft reboot.Contents1 Terminology1.1 Origin of the term 1.2 Cold vs. warm reboot 1.3 Hard reboot 1.4 Restart2 Causes2.1 Deliberate 2.2 Power failure 2.3 Random reboot3 Hibernation 4 Simulated reboot 5 Windows deviations and labeling criticism 6 See also 7 ReferencesTerminology[edit] Origin of the term[edit] Early electronic computers (like the 1401) had no operating system and little internal memory
[...More...]

"Hard Reboot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Windows Explorer
File
File
Explorer, previously known as Windows Explorer, is a file manager application that is included with releases of the Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows operating system from Windows 95
Windows 95
onwards. It provides a graphical user interface for accessing the file systems. It is also the component of the operating system that presents many user interface items on the monitor such as the taskbar and desktop
[...More...]

"Windows Explorer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

HIMEM.SYS
HIMEM.SYS is a DOS device driver which allows DOS programs to store data in extended memory via the Extended Memory Specification (XMS). This device driver is of particular importance because various versions of Microsoft Windows that ran on top of the DOS operating system required HIMEM.SYS to be loaded to be able to run. As of MS-DOS 5.0, HIMEM.SYS was introduced and could be used to load the DOS kernel code into the High Memory Area (HMA) to increase the amount of available conventional memory by specifying DOS=HIGH in CONFIG.SYS. HIMEM.SYS provides access to the memory beyond the first 1 MB of space and thus is required by Windows 9x/Me in order to load the graphical portions of the operating systems
[...More...]

"HIMEM.SYS" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

SMARTDRV.EXE
SmartDrive (or SMARTDRV) was a disk caching program shipped with MS-DOS versions 4.01 through 6.22 and Windows 3.0 through Windows 3.11.[1] It improved data transfer rates by storing frequently accessed data in random-access memory (RAM).[2] Early versions of SmartDrive were loaded through a CONFIG.SYS device driver named SMARTDRV.SYS.[1] Versions 4.0 and later were loaded through an executable file named SMARTDRV.EXE, which could be run at user's discretion or at boot time via AUTOEXEC.BAT.[1] However, SMARTDRV.EXE also includes double-buffering driver that should be loaded through CONFIG.SYS.[2] Version 4.0 also introduced 32-bit disk access and could reduce its footprint in conventional memory (the first 640 kilobytes of memory which was critical to MS-DOS) by running in upper memory area (the 384 kilobytes of memory located beyond the conventional memory).[2] A cloaked variant of SmartDrive utilizing the Helix Cloaking API was available from Helix Software
[...More...]

"SMARTDRV.EXE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

IO.SYS
IO.SYS is an essential part of MS-DOS
MS-DOS
and Windows 9x. It contains the default MS-DOS
MS-DOS
device drivers (hardware interfacing routines) and the DOS initialization program.Contents1 Boot sequence 2 Disk layout requirements 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBoot sequence[edit] In the PC bootup sequence, the first sector of the boot disk is loaded into memory and executed. If this is the DOS boot sector, it loads the first three sectors of IO.SYS into memory and transfers control to it. IO.SYS then:Loads the rest of itself into memory. Initializes each default device driver in turn (console, disk, serial port, etc..). At this point, the default devices are available. Loads the DOS kernel and calls its initialization routine. The kernel is stored in MSDOS.SYS with MS-DOS
MS-DOS
and in IO.SYS with Windows 9x
[...More...]

"IO.SYS" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.