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Wilson, Ohio
Wilson is a village in Belmont and Monroe counties in the U.S. state of Ohio. It is part of the Wheeling, West Virginia
Wheeling, West Virginia
Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 125 at the 2010 census.[6]Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics2.1 2010 census 2.2 2000 census3 ReferencesGeography[edit] Wilson is located at 39°51′45″N 81°4′15″W / 39.86250°N 81.07083°W / 39.86250; -81.07083 (39.862506, -81.070815).[7] According to the United States Census
Census
Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.47 square miles (1.22 km2), of which 0.41 square miles (1.06 km2) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km2) is water.[1] Demographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1960 90—1970 13347.8%1980 1362.3%1990 1360.0%2000 118−13.2%2010 1255.9%Est. 2016 124 [8] −0.8%U.S
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Village (United States)
In the United States, the meaning of "village" varies by geographic area and legal jurisdiction. In many areas, "village" is a term, sometimes informal, for a type of administrative division at the local government level. Since the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the federal government from legislating on local government, the states are free to have political subdivisions called "villages" or not to and to define the word in many ways. Typically, a village is a type of municipality, although it can also be a special district or an unincorporated area
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Hispanic (U.S. Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Census, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget
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1980 United States Census
The Twentieth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11.4 percent over the 203,184,772 persons enumerated during the 1970 Census.[1]Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] The 1980 census collected the following information from all respondents:[2]Address Name Household relationship Sex Race Age Marital status Whether of Spanish/Hispanic origin or descentIt was the first census not to ask for the name of the "head of household."[3] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1980 census, which contained over 100 questions
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1990 United States Census
The Twenty-first United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9.8 percent over the 226,545,805 persons enumerated during the 1980 Census.[1] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1990 census, which contained over 100 questions. Full documentation on the 1990 census, including census forms and a procedural history, is available from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. It was the first census to designate "Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander" as a racial group separate from Asians. To increase black participation in the 1990 United States
United States
Census, the bureau recruited Bill Cosby, Magic Johnson, Alfre Woodard, and Miss America Debbye Turner
Debbye Turner
as spokespeople.[2] The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
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2000 United States Census
[[File:Seal of the United States Census
United States Census
Bur tion = U.S. Census Bureau Sealframeless]]Census LogoGeneral informationCountry United StatesDate taken April 1, 2000Total population 281,421,906Percent change 13.2%Most populous state California 33,871,648Least populous state Wyoming 493,782The Twenty-second United States
United States
Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census.[1] This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.[2] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 2000 census, which contained over 100 questions
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Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations
United Nations
defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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White (U.S. Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Census, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget
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Latino (U.S. Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Census, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget
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1960 United States Census
The Eighteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 179,323,175, an increase of 18.5 percent over the 151,325,798 persons enumerated during the 1950 Census.Contents1 Data availability 2 State rankings 3 City rankings 4 Notes 5 External linksData availability[edit] Microdata from the 1960 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System
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Marriage
Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity (in-laws and other family through marriage).[1] The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal
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Per Capita Income
Per capita income or average income measures the average income earned per person in a given area (city, region, country, etc.) in a specified year. It is calculated by dividing the area's total income by its total population.[1][2]Contents1 As a measure of prosperity1.1 United States2 Critics 3 See also 4 ReferencesAs a measure of prosperity[edit] Per capita income is national income/total population. Per capita income is often used to measure an area's average income. This is used to see the wealth of the population with those of others. Per capita income is often used to measure a country's standard of living
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Poverty Line
The poverty threshold, poverty limit or poverty line is the minimum level of income deemed adequate in a particular country.[1] In practice, like the definition of poverty, the official or common understanding of the poverty line is significantly higher in developed countries than in developing countries.[2][3] In 2008, the World Bank came out with a figure (revised largely due to inflation) of $1.25 a day at 2005 purchasing-power parity (PPP).[4] In October 2015, the World Bank
World Bank
updated the international poverty line to $1.90 a day. The new figure of $1.90 is based on ICP purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations and represents the international equivalent of what $1.90 could buy in the US in 2011. The new IPL replaces the $1.25 per day figure, which used 2005 data
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United States Geological Survey
The United States
United States
Geological Survey (USGS, formerly simply Geological Survey) is a scientific agency of the United States
United States
government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility. The USGS is a bureau of the United States
United States
Department of the Interior; it is that department's sole scientific agency. The USGS employs approximately 8,670 people[1] and is headquartered in Reston, Virginia
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County Seat
A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is used in the United States, Canada, Romania, Mainland China
Mainland China
and Taiwan. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland, and historically in Jamaica.Contents1 Function 2 U.S. counties with more than one county seat 3 Other variations3.1 New England 3.2 Virginia 3.3 South Dakota 3.4 Louisiana 3.5 Alaska 3.6 Canada
Canada
and Vermont4 Lists of U.S. county seats by state 5 Lists of Taiwan
Taiwan
county seats by county 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFunction[edit] In most of the United States, counties are the political subdivisions of a state. The city, town, or populated place that houses county government is known as the seat of its respective county
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