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Wilmington, Delaware
Wilmington (Lenape: Paxahakink, Pakehakink[6]) is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Delaware. The city was built on the site of Fort Christina, the first Swedish settlement in North America. It is at the confluence of the Christina River
Christina River
and Brandywine River, near where the Christina flows into the Delaware
Delaware
River. It is the county seat of New Castle County and one of the major cities in the Delaware Valley metropolitan area. Wilmington was named by Proprietor Thomas Penn after his friend Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington, who was prime minister in the reign of George II of Great Britain. As of the 2017 United States Census
United States Census
estimate, the city's population is 72,846.[7] It is the fifth least populous city in the U.S. to be the most populous in its state
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Susquehannocks
Susquehannock
Susquehannock
people, also called the Conestoga (by the English)[2] were Iroquoian-speaking Native Americans who lived in areas adjacent to the Susquehanna River
Susquehanna River
and its tributaries ranging from its upper reaches in the southern part of what is now New York (near the lands of the Five Nations of the Iroquois
Iroquois
Confederacy), through eastern and central Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
West of the Poconos
Poconos
and the upper Delaware River (and the Delaware nations), with lands extending beyond the mouth of the Susquehanna in Maryland
Maryland
along the west bank of the Potomac[3] at the north end of the Chesapeake Bay
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Thomas Penn
Thomas Penn
Thomas Penn
(March 20, 1702 – March 21, 1775) was a son of William Penn, founder of the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony that became the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Pennsylvania. Thomas Penn was born in Bristol, England
Bristol, England
after his father returned there in 1701 because of financial difficulties. Thomas Penn's mother was his father's second wife, Hannah Callowhill Penn
Hannah Callowhill Penn
(1671–1726), daughter of Thomas Callowhill.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Penn inherited the position of Proprietor of the Colony
Colony
of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
for the Crown of England
England
in 1718 along with his brothers John and Richard on the death of their father William Penn, until 1746 when John died
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ZIP Code
ZIP Codes are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service (USPS) since 1963. The term ZIP is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan;[1] it was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently and quickly (zipping along) when senders use the code in the postal address. The basic format consists of five digits. An extended 'ZIP+4' code was introduced in 1983 which includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four additional digits that determine a more specific location. The term ZIP Code
ZIP Code
was originally registered as a servicemark by the U.S
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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Area Code 302
Area code 302 is the only telephone area code for the U.S. state of Delaware
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Geographic Names Information System
The Geographic Names Information System
Geographic Names Information System
(GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States
United States
of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States
United States
Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States
United States
Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded
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Unami Language
Unami is an Algonquian language spoken by Lenape
Lenape
people in the late 17th-century and the early 18th-century, in what then was (or later became) the southern two-thirds of New Jersey, southeastern Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the northern two-thirds of Delaware, but later in Ontario and Oklahoma. It is one of the two Delaware languages, the other being Munsee. The last fluent speaker in the United States, Edward Thompson, of the Delaware Tribe of Indians, died on 31 August 2002.[1] His sister Nora Thompson Dean (1907–1984) provided valuable information about the language to linguists and other scholars. Lenape
Lenape
is an English word derived from /lənaːpːe/, a word in the Unami dialect whose most literal translation into English would be "common person".[3][4] The Lenape
Lenape
names for the areas they inhabited were Scheyichbi (i.e
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Confluence
In geography, a confluence (also: conflux) occurs where two or more flowing bodies of water join together to form a single channel.[1] A confluence can occur in several configurations: at the point where a tributary joins a larger river (main stem); or where two streams meet to become the source of a river of a new name (such as the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers at Pittsburgh, forming the Ohio); or where two separated channels of a river (forming a river island) rejoin at the downstream end.Contents1 Scientific study of confluences1.1 Confluence
Confluence
Flow Zones (River)2 Confluences and humankind 3 Notable confluences3.1 Africa 3.2 Asia 3.3 Australia 3.4 Europe 3.5 North America 3.6 South America4 Confluences not of two rivers 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksScientific study of confluences[edit] Confluences are studied in a variety of sciences
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Proprietary Colony
A proprietary colony was a type of British colony mostly in North America and the Caribbean
Caribbean
in the 17th century.[1] In the British Empire, all land belonged to the ruler, and it was his prerogative to divide. Therefore, all colonial properties were partitioned by royal charter into one of four types: proprietary, royal, joint stock, or covenant. King Charles II used the proprietary solution to reward allies and focus his own attention on Britain itself. He offered his friends colonial charters which facilitated private investment and colonial self-government. The charters made the proprietor the effective ruler, albeit one ultimately responsible to English Law and the King
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Prime Minister Of The United Kingdom
The Prime Minister
Prime Minister
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is the head of Her Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom. The Prime Minister
Prime Minister
(informally abbreviated to PM) and Cabinet (consisting of all the most senior ministers, most of whom are government department heads) are collectively accountable for their policies and actions to the Monarch, to Parliament, to their political party and ultimately to the electorate. The office is one of the Great Offices of State
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(DST), also daylight savings time or daylight time (United States) and summer time (United Kingdom, European Union, and others), is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn.[1] In effect, DST causes a lost hour of sleep in the spring and an extra hour of sleep in the fall.[2][3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the 1970s energy crisis
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George II Of Great Britain
George II (George Augustus; German: Georg II. August; 30 October / 9 November 1683O.S./N.S. – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Prince-elector
Prince-elector
of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
from 11 June 1727 (O.S.) until his death in 1760. George was the last British monarch born outside Great Britain: he was born and brought up in northern Germany. His grandmother, Sophia of Hanover, became second in line to the British throne after about fifty Catholics higher in line were excluded by the Act of Settlement 1701 and the Acts of Union 1707, which restricted the succession to Protestants. After the deaths of Sophia and Anne, Queen of Great Britain, in 1714, his father George I, Elector of Hanover, inherited the British throne
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United States Census
The United States
United States
Census
Census
is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States
United States
Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States ... according to their respective Numbers ... . The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years."[1][2] The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is responsible for the United States
United States
Census
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Sweden
Coordinates: 63°N 16°E / 63°N 16°E / 63; 16Kingdom of SwedenKonungariket Sverige  (Swedish) Flag Coat of arms Motto: (royal) "För Sverige – i tiden"[a]"For Sweden – With the Times"[1]Anthem: Du gamla, Du fria[b]Thou ancient, thou free Royal anthem: KungssångenSong of the KingShow globeShow map of EuropeLocation of Sweden (dark green)– in Europe (green & dark grey)– in the European Union (green)  –  [Legend]Capitaland largest cityStockholm59°21′N 18°4′E / 59.350°N 18.067°E / 59.350; 18.067Official languagesSwedish[c] Official minority languages:[c]FinnishMeänkieliSamiRomaniYiddishEthnic groups No official statistics[d]Demonym(s)SwedishSwedeGovernmentUnitary parliamentaryconstitutional monarchy• Monarch Carl XVI Gustaf• 
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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