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William Willett
WILLIAM WILLETT (10 August 1856 – 4 March 1915) was a British builder and a tireless promoter of British Summer Time
British Summer Time
. CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Family * 3 References * 4 Further reading BIOGRAPHYWillett was born in Farnham, Surrey , in the United Kingdom, and educated at the Philological School . After some commercial experience, he entered his father's building business, Willett Building Services. Between them they created a reputation for "Willett built" quality houses in choice parts of London and the south, including Chelsea and Hove
Hove
, including Derwent House . He lived most of his life in Chislehurst , Kent, where, it is said, after riding his horse in Petts Wood near his home early one summer morning and noticing how many blinds were still down, the idea for daylight saving time first occurred to him
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Blue Plaque
A BLUE PLAQUE is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person or event, serving as a historical marker . The brainchild of British politician William Ewart in 1863, it is the oldest such scheme in the world. The world's first blue plaques were erected in London in the 19th century to mark the homes and workplaces of famous people. This scheme continues to the present day, having been administered successively by the Society of Arts (1867–1901), the London County Council (1901–1965), the Greater London Council
Greater London Council
(1965–1986), and English Heritage
English Heritage
(1986 to date). Many other plaque schemes have since been initiated in the United Kingdom. Some are restricted to a specific geographical area, others to a particular theme of historical commemoration
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Brighton And Hove
BRIGHTON AND HOVE (/ˈbraɪtən ən ˈhoʊv/ ) is a city in East Sussex
Sussex
, in South East England
England
. At the 2011 census , it was England's most populous seaside resort with a population of 273,400. The towns of Brighton
Brighton
and Hove
Hove
formed a unitary authority in 1997 and in 2001 were granted city status by Queen Elizabeth II
Queen Elizabeth II
. "Brighton" is often referred to synonymously with the official " Brighton
Brighton
and Hove" although many locals still consider the two to be separate towns
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Sic
The Latin
Latin
adverb SIC ("thus"; "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written") inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription . The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text. It is generally placed inside brackets to indicate that it is not part of the quoted matter. Sic may also be used derisively by the proofreader, to call attention to the original writer's spelling mistakes and erroneous logic or to show general disapproval or dislike of the material
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London Borough Of Bromley
77.4% White British 1.4% White Irish 0.2% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 5.3% Other White 1.3% White & Black Caribbean 0.4% White & Black African 1% White "> Sundridge Park The borough is partly urban and partly rural, the former to the north and very much part of the built-up area of suburban London. The principal parts of the northern section, from west to east, are Beckenham , which includes Eden Park and Elmers End ; Bromley
Bromley
with Bickley
Bickley
, Bromley
Bromley
Park and Bromley
Bromley
Common , Park Langley, Plaistow, Shortlands , and Southborough; Chislehurst , with Elmstead and Sundridge
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Influenza
INFLUENZA, commonly known as "the FLU", is an infectious disease caused by an influenza virus . Symptoms can be mild to severe. The most common symptoms include: a high fever , runny nose , sore throat , muscle pains , headache , coughing , and feeling tired . These symptoms typically begin two days after exposure to the virus and most last less than a week. The cough, however, may last for more than two weeks. In children, there may be nausea and vomiting , but these are not common in adults. Nausea and vomiting occur more commonly in the unrelated infection gastroenteritis , which is sometimes inaccurately referred to as "stomach flu" or "24-hour flu". Complications of influenza may include viral pneumonia , secondary bacterial pneumonia , sinus infections , and worsening of previous health problems such as asthma or heart failure . Three types of influenza viruses affect people, called Type A, Type B, and Type C
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First World War
Allied victory * Central Power 's victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front * Fall of the German , Russian , Ottoman , and Austro-Hungarian empires * Russian Civil War and foundation of Soviet Union
Soviet Union
* Formation of new countries in Europe and the Middle East * Transfer of German colonies and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers * Establishment of the League of Nations
League of Nations
. (more..
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Defence Of The Realm Act
The DEFENCE OF THE REALM ACT (DORA) was passed in the United Kingdom on 8 August 1914, four days after it entered World War I
World War I
. It gave the government wide-ranging powers during the war period, such as the power to requisition buildings or land needed for the war effort , or to make regulations creating criminal offences. DORA ushered in a variety of authoritarian social control mechanisms, such as censorship : "No person shall by word of mouth or in writing spread reports likely to cause disaffection or alarm among any of His Majesty's forces or among the civilian population" Anti-war activists, including Willie Gallacher , John William Muir , and Bertrand Russell
Bertrand Russell
, were sent to prison
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Coldplay
COLDPLAY are a British rock band formed in 1996 by lead vocalist and keyboardist Chris Martin and lead guitarist Jonny Buckland at University College London
University College London
(UCL). After they formed under the name Pectoralz, Guy Berryman joined the group as bassist and they changed their name to Starfish. Will Champion joined as drummer and backing vocalist, completing the lineup. Creative director Phil Harvey is often referred to as the fifth member by the band. The band renamed themselves "Coldplay" in 1998, before recording and releasing three EPs: Safety in 1998 and Brothers & Sisters and The Blue Room in 1999. The Blue Room was their first release on a major label, after signing to Parlophone
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Berthold Ullman
BERTHOLD LOUIS ULLMAN (August 18, 1882 in Chicago, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
– June 26, 1965 in Vatican City
Vatican City
) was an American Classical scholar. Ullman was born in Chicago to Louis Ullman and Eleanora Fried. He was educated at the University of Chicago (A.B. 1903, Ph.D. 1908). He joined the faculty at Chicago and also taught at the University of Pittsburgh and Iowa State University
Iowa State University
. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1925 until 1944 before moving to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, becoming Kenan professor of Latin and department chair. Ullman's library collection formed the core of the present classics department library at the University of North Carolina. Ullman was also president of the American Philological Association in 1935
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The ENCYCLOPæDIA BRITANNICA ( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. , is a general knowledge English-language encyclopaedia . It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize winners and five American presidents . The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
, as three volumes. The encyclopaedia grew in size: the second edition was 10 volumes, and by its fourth edition (1801–1810) it had expanded to 20 volumes
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a DIGITAL OBJECT IDENTIFIER or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
( ISO
ISO
). An implementation of the Handle System , DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL , indicating where the object can be found
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor ; short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals , it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals. It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals. As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR; most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone. JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Content * 3 Access * 3.1 Aaron Swartz incident * 3.2 Limitations * 3.3 Increasing public access * 4 Use * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links HISTORY William G. Bowen , president of Princeton University from 1972 to 1988, founded JSTOR
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Anonymously
ANONYMITY, adjective "anonymous", is derived from the Greek word ἀνωνυμία, anonymia, meaning "without a name " or "namelessness". In colloquial use, "anonymous" is used to describe situations where the acting person's name is unknown. Some writers have argued that namelessness, though technically correct, does not capture what is more centrally at stake in contexts of anonymity. The important idea here is that a person be non-identifiable, unreachable, or untrackable. Anonymity is seen as a technique, or a way of realizing, certain other values, such as privacy, or liberty. An important example for anonymity being not only protected, but enforced by law is probably the vote in free elections . In many other situations (like conversation between strangers, buying some product or service in a shop), anonymity is traditionally accepted as natural. There are also various situations in which a person might choose to withhold their identity
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