HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

William Rowley
William Rowley
William Rowley
(c.1585 – February 1626) was an English Jacobean dramatist, best known for works written in collaboration with more successful writers. His date of birth is estimated to have been c. 1585; he was buried on 11 February 1626 in the graveyard of St James's, Clerkenwell in north London. (An unambiguous record of Rowley's death was discovered in 1928,[1] but some authorities persist in listing his death-date as 1642.)Contents1 Life and work 2 Plays by Rowley 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Rowley was an actor-playwright who specialized in playing clown characters (that is, characters whose function is to provide low comedy). He must also have been a large man, since his forte lay specifically in fat-clown roles. He played the Fat Bishop in Thomas Middleton's A Game at Chess, and Plumporridge in the same author's Inner Temple Masque
[...More...]

"William Rowley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New International Encyclopedia
The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was an American encyclopedia first published in 1902 by Dodd, Mead and Company.[1] It descended from the International Cyclopaedia (1884) and was updated in 1906, 1914 and 1926.Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Contributors and office editors 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
was the successor of the International Cyclopaedia (1884). Initially, the International Cyclopaedia was largely a reprint of Alden's Library of Universal Knowledge, which was a reprint of the British Chambers's Encyclopaedia
Chambers's Encyclopaedia
with American additions (including many biographical entries for Americans). The local Cyclopaedia was much improved by editors Harry Thurston Peck and Selim Peabody
[...More...]

"New International Encyclopedia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hope Theatre
The Hope Theatre
Hope Theatre
was one of the theatres built in and around London for the presentation of plays in English Renaissance theatre, comparable to the Globe, the Curtain, the Swan, and other famous theatres of the era.[2] The Hope was built in 1613–14 by Philip Henslowe and a partner, Jacob Meade, on the site of the old Beargarden
Beargarden
on the Bankside
Bankside
in Southwark, on the south side of the River Thames
River Thames
— at that time, outside the legal bounds of the City of London. Henslowe had had a financial interest in the Beargarden
Beargarden
(the ring for bear-baiting and similar "animal sports") since 1594; on 29 August 1613 he contracted with the carpenter Gilbert Katherens to tear down the Beargarden, and to build a theatre in its place, for a fee of £360
[...More...]

"Hope Theatre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gerald Eades Bentley
Gerald Eades Bentley (September 15, 1901 – July 25, 1994) was an American academic and literary scholar, best remembered for his seven-volume work, The Jacobean and Caroline Stage, published by Oxford University Press between 1941 and 1968. That work, modeled on Edmund Kerchever Chambers' classic four-volume The Elizabethan Stage, has itself become a standard and essential reference work on English Renaissance theatre. Bentley was born in Brazil, Indiana, the son of a Methodist clergyman. Originally intending to be a creative writer, he changed his career to literary scholarship during his graduate studies. He earned his B.A. at DePauw University (1923), his M.A. in English at the University of Illinois (1926), and his Ph.D. at the University of London (1929), studying under Allardyce Nicoll
[...More...]

"Gerald Eades Bentley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Edmund Kerchever Chambers
Sir Edmund Kerchever Chambers, KBE, CB, FBA (16 March 1866 – 21 January 1954), usually cited as E. K. Chambers, was an English literary critic and Shakespearean scholar. His four-volume history of The Elizabethan Stage, published in 1923, remains a standard resource for scholars.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Chambers was born in West Ilsley, Berkshire. His father was a curate there and his mother the daughter of a Victorian theologian. He was educated at Marlborough College, before matriculating at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. He won a number of prizes, including the chancellor's prize in English for an essay on literary forgery. He took a job with the national education department, and married Eleanor Bowman in 1893. In the newly created Board of Education, Chambers worked principally to oversee adult and continuing education
[...More...]

"Edmund Kerchever Chambers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

A Cure For A Cuckold
A cuckold is the husband of an adulterous wife. In evolutionary biology, the term is also applied to males who are unwittingly investing parental effort in offspring that are not genetically their own.[1]Contents1 History of the term 2 Metaphor and symbolism 3 Cuckoldry as a fetish 4 The term "cuck" in politics 5 Theory5.1 Theories in psychology 5.2 Theories in evolutionary biology and psychology6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory of the termc. 1815 French satire on cuckoldry, which shows both men and women wearing hornsThe word cuckold derives from the cuckoo bird, alluding to its habit of laying its eggs in other birds' nests.[2][3] The association is common in medieval folklore, literature, and iconography. English usage first appears about 1250 in the satirical and polemical poem "The Owl and the Nightingale" (l. 1544). The term was clearly regarded as embarrassingly direct, as evident in John Lydgate's "Fall of Princes" (c. 1440)
[...More...]

"A Cure For A Cuckold" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Andrew John Gurr
Andrew John Gurr (born 23 December 1936) is a contemporary literary scholar who specializes in William Shakespeare and English Renaissance theatre.Contents1 Life and work 2 Books by Andrew Gurr 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Born in Leicester, Gurr was raised in New Zealand, and educated at the University of Auckland and at Cambridge University. He has taught at the Universities of Wellington, Leeds, and Nairobi (1969–73); at the latter institution he was also head of his department. He taught at the University of Reading before his retirement. Gurr co-wrote a 1981 study of Katherine Mansfield (with Claire Hanson) and two books on African literature; but he is best known for his books on Shakespeare and his contemporaries, and the theatre of that historical era—books that are recognized and utilized as essential references on English Renaissance drama
[...More...]

"Andrew John Gurr" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Globe Theatre
The Globe Theatre
Globe Theatre
was a theatre in London associated with William Shakespeare
[...More...]

"Globe Theatre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Thomas Seccombe
Thomas Seccombe (1866—1923) was a miscellaneous English writer and, from 1891 to 1901, assistant editor of the Dictionary of National Biography,[1] in which he wrote over 700 entries. He was educated at Felsted and Balliol College, Oxford, taking a first in Modern History in 1889. Works[edit]Twelve Bad Men (1894) The Age of Johnson (1900) The Age of Shakespeare (with John William Allen (1865–1944), 1903) Bookman History of English Literature (with W. Robertson Nicoll, 1905-6) In Praise of Oxford (1910) Scott Centenary Articles (with W. P. Ker, George Gordon, W. H. Hutton, Arthur McDowall, and R. S. Rait, 1932) The Dictionary of National Biography
Dictionary of National Biography
(assistant editor)References[edit]^ "SECCOMBE, Thomas". Who's Who. Vol. 59. 1907. p. 1577. Cousin, John W. A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature. 1910. Mullin, Katherine. "Seccombe, Thomas"
[...More...]

"Thomas Seccombe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

St James's, Clerkenwell
St James Church, Clerkenwell,[1] is an Anglican parish church in Clerkenwell, London, England.Contents1 History1.1 Nunnery of St Mary: c. 1100–1539 1.2 Old Church of St James: 1540–1788 1.3 New Church of St James: 1792–present2 Historical features 3 The church now 4 The crypt 5 References 6 Further readingHistory[edit] Nunnery of St Mary: c. 1100–1539[edit] The parish of St James, Clerkenwell, has had a long and sometimes lively history. The springs which give Clerkenwell its name are mentioned during the reign of Henry II. The parish clerks of London used to perform their mystery plays, plays based on Biblical themes, in the neighbourhood, sometimes in the presence of royalty
[...More...]

"St James's, Clerkenwell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dramatist
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
[...More...]

"Dramatist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dictionary Of National Biography
The Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history, published from 1885. The updated Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Biography
(ODNB) was published on 23 September 2004 in 60 volumes and online, with 50,113 biographical articles covering 54,922 lives.Contents1 First series 2 Supplements and revisions 3 Concise dictionary 4 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography 5 First series contents 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksFirst series[edit] Hoping to emulate national biographical collections published elsewhere in Europe, such as the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie (1875), in 1882 the publisher George Smith (1824–1901), of Smith, Elder & Co., planned a universal dictionary that would include biographical entries on individuals from world history. He approached Leslie Stephen, then editor of the Cornhill Magazine, owned by Smith, to become the editor
[...More...]

"Dictionary Of National Biography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Curtain Playhouse
The Curtain Theatre was an Elizabethan playhouse located in Hewett Street, Shoreditch (part of the modern London Borough of Hackney), just outside the City of London. It opened in 1577, and continued staging plays until 1624.[1] The Curtain was built some 200 yards (180 m) south of London's first playhouse, The Theatre, which had opened a year before, in 1576. It was called the "Curtain" because it was located near a plot of land called Curtain Close, not because of the sort of front curtain associated with modern theatres, but of its proximity of the City walls, curtain or curtain wall referring to the part of city walls between two bastions.[2] Its remains were rediscovered in archaeological excavation in 2012. The most significant find was that the Curtain was rectangular not round. They found a 14-metre (46 ft) stage, and evidence of a tunnel under the stage and galleries at the first floor level
[...More...]

"Curtain Playhouse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Prince Charles's Men
Prince Charles's Men (known as the Duke of York's Men from 1608 to 1612) was a playing company or troupe of actors in Jacobean and Caroline England.[1][2] The Jacobean era troupe[edit] The company was formed in 1608 as the Duke of York's Men, under the titular patronage of King James' second son, the eight-year-old Charles (1600–49), then the Duke of York. Upon the death of Charles's elder brother Prince Henry in 1612, the company became Prince Charles's Men. They played mainly in the provinces for the first two years of their existence, but in 1610 they received a renewed royal patent that authorized them to play in London, "in such usual houses as themselves shall provide." Seven actors are listed in the patent: John Garland, William Rowley, Thomas Hobbes, Robert Dawes, Joseph Taylor, John Newton, and Gilbert Reason
[...More...]

"Prince Charles's Men" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Fletcher (playwright)
John Fletcher (1579–1625) was a Jacobean playwright. Following William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
as house playwright for the King's Men, he was among the most prolific and influential dramatists of his day; both during his lifetime and in the early Restoration, his fame rivalled Shakespeare's. Though his reputation has been far eclipsed since, Fletcher remains an important transitional figure between the Elizabethan popular tradition and the popular drama of the Restoration.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Collaborations with Beaumont 1.3 Successor to Shakespeare2 Stage history 3 Plays3.1 Solo plays 3.2 Collaborations4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Fletcher was born in December 1579 (baptised 20 December)[1] in Rye, Sussex, and died of the plague in August 1625 (buried 29 August in St. Saviour's, Southwark)
[...More...]

"John Fletcher (playwright)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.