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William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst Sr. (/hɜːrst/; April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American businessman, politician, and newspaper publisher who built the nation's largest newspaper chain and media company Hearst Communications and whose flamboyant methods of yellow journalism influenced the nation's popular media by emphasizing sensationalism and human interest stories. Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887 after being given control of San Francisco Examiner">The San Francisco Examiner by his wealthy father. Moving to New York City, he acquired The New York Journal and fought a bitter circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer's New York World that sold papers by giant headlines over lurid stories featuring crime, corruption, graphics, sex, and innuendo. Acquiring more newspapers, Hearst created a chain that numbered nearly thirty papers in major American cities at its peak
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Concord, New Hampshire
Concord /ˈkɒŋ.kərd/ is the capital city of the U.S. state of New Hampshire and the county seat of Merrimack County. As of the United States Census">2010 census, its population was 42,695. Concord includes the villages of Penacook, East Concord, and West Concord. The city is home to the New Hampshire School of Law">University of New Hampshire School of Law, New Hampshire's only law school; St
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Galway
Galway (/ˈɡɔːlw/; Irish: Gaillimh, pronounced [ˈɡalʲɪvʲ]) is a City status in Ireland">city in the West of Ireland in the province of Connacht. Galway City Council"> Galway City Council is the local authority for the city. Galway lies on the River Corrib between Lough Corrib and Galway Bay"> Galway Bay and is surrounded by County Galway
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President Of The United States

			<a  onclick= United States House of Representatives 194-1-240.svg" src="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg/50px-United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg.png" width="50" height="26" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg/75px-United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg.png 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg/100px-United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg.png 2x" data-file-width
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History Of The United States Democratic Party
The Democratic Party is the oldest voter-based political party in the world and the oldest existing political party in the United States, tracing its heritage back to the anti-Federalists of the 1790s. During the Second Party System (from 1832 to the mid-1850s) under Presidents Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk, the Democrats usually bested the opposition Whig Party by narrow margins. Both parties worked hard to build grassroots organizations and maximize the turnout of voters, which often reached 80 percent or 90 percent. Both parties used patronage extensively to finance their operations, which included emerging big city political machines as well as national networks of newspapers. The Democratic Party was a proponent for slave-owners across the country, urban workers and caucasian immigrants.

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United States House Of Representatives

			<a  onclick= United States House of Representatives 194-1-240.svg" src="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg/50px-United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg.png" width="50" height="26" srcset="//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg/75px-United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg.png 1.5x, //upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg/100px-United_States_House_of_Representatives_194-1-240.svg.png 2x" data-file-width="360" data-file-height="185" />
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National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is a National Register of Historic Places property types">building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A National Historic Landmark District may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties
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Alma Mater
Alma mater (Latin: Latin language text" xml:lang="la">alma "nourishing/kind", Latin language text" xml:lang="la">mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] Latin language text" xml:lang="la">almae matres) is an allegorical Latin phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S
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Ulster Protestant
Ulster Protestants (Irish: Protastúnaigh Uladh) are an ethnoreligious group in the Irish province of Ulster, where they make up about 43% of the population. Many Ulster Protestantism in Ireland">Protestants are descendants of settlers who arrived in the early 17th century Ulster Plantation"> Ulster Plantation. This was the colonisation of the Gaelic, Catholic province of Ulster with English-speaking Protestants from Great Britain, mostly from the Scottish Lowlands and Northern England. Many more Scottish Protestant migrants arrived in Ulster in the late 17th century. Those who came from Scotland were mostly Presbyterians while those from England were mostly Anglicans
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Ballybay
Ballybay (Irish: Béal Átha Beithe, meaning "mouth of the ford of the birch") is a town in County Monaghan in Ireland, centered on the crossroads of the R183 and R162 regional roads
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South Carolina
South Carolina (/ˌkærəˈlnə/ (About this soundlisten)) is a state in the Southeastern United States and the easternmost of the Deep South. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River. South Carolina became the eighth state to ratify the United States Constitution">U.S. Constitution on May 23, 1788. South Carolina became the first state to vote in favor of secession from the Union on December 20, 1860. After the American Civil War, it was readmitted into the United States on June 25, 1868. South Carolina is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state
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Progressive Movement
Progressivism is the support for or advocacy of improvement of society by reform. As a philosophy, it is based on the Idea of Progress, which asserts that advancements in science, technology, economic development, and social organization are vital to the improvement of the human condition. Progressivism became highly significant during the Age of Enlightenment in Europe, out of the belief that Europe was demonstrating that societies could progress in civility from uncivilized conditions to civilization through strengthening the basis of empirical knowledge as the foundation of society. Figures of the Enlightenment believed that progress had universal application to all societies and that these ideas would spread across the world from Europe. The meanings of progressivism have varied over time and from different perspectives
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Irish Protestants
Protestantism is a Christian minority on the island of Ireland. In the 2011 census of Northern Ireland, 48% (883,768) described themselves as Protestant, which was a decline of approximately 5% from the 2001 census. In the 2011 census of the Republic of Ireland, 4.27% of the population described themselves as Protestant. In the Republic, Protestantism was the second largest religious grouping until the 2002 census in which they were exceeded by those who chose "No Religion". Some forms of Protestantism existed in Ireland in the early 16th century before the English Reformation, but demographically speaking these were very insignificant and the real influx of Protestantism began only with the spread of the English Reformation to Ireland
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Mayor Of New York City
The Mayor of the City of New York is head of the executive branch of New York City's government
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018, it is the fourth most populous state. In order to distinguish the state from the city with the same name, it is sometimes referred to as New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City, makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island. The state and city were both named for the 17th century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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