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William Mellor
William Mellor (1888–1942) was a left-wing British journalist. A Guild Socialist
Guild Socialist
during the 1910s, Mellor worked closely with G. D. H. Cole, founding the National Guilds League
National Guilds League
with him in 1915.[1] He joined the Daily Herald in 1913 as a journalist, and was imprisoned during the First World War
First World War
as a conscientious objector, returning to the Herald on his release.[2] He was a founder-member of the Communist Party of Great Britain in 1920, but resigned in 1924. He became editor of the Herald in 1926, succeeding George Lansbury
George Lansbury
when the Trades Union Congress took over the paper, and was fired in 1930 soon after Odhams Press
Odhams Press
took half-ownership with the TUC
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Trades Union Congress
The Trades Union Congress
Trades Union Congress
(TUC) is a national trade union centre, a federation of trade unions in England
England
and Wales, representing the majority of trade unions. There are fifty affiliated unions, with a total of about 5.6 million members.[1] The current General Secretary is Frances O'Grady.[2] The TUC’s mission is to support trade unions to grow and thrive, and to stand up for everyone who works for a living. They campaign for more and better jobs, and a more equal, more prosperous country.[1]Contents1 Organisation 2 Campaigns2.1 Key achievements3 History3.1 19th century 3.2 20th century4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksOrganisation[edit] See also: List of affiliates of the Trades Union Congress The TUC's decision-making body is the Annual Congress, which takes place in September. Between congresses decisions are made by the General Council, which meets every two months
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Spartacus Educational
Spartacus Educational is a free online encyclopedia with essays and other educational material on a wide variety of historical subjects (including British History
British History
and the History of the USA, as well as other subjects including the First World War, Second World War, Russian Revolution, Slavery, Women's Suffrage, Nazi Germany, Spanish Civil War, and The Cold War)
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Popular Front
A popular front is a broad coalition of different political groupings, usually made up of leftists and centrists. Being very broad, they can sometimes include centrist and liberal (or "bourgeois") forces as well as social-democratic and communist groups. Popular fronts are larger in scope than united fronts. In addition to the general definition, the term "popular front" also has a specific meaning in the history of Europe
Europe
and the United States during the 1930s, and in the history of Communism
Communism
and the Communist Party
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Odhams Press
Odhams Press
Odhams Press
was a British publishing company. Originally a newspaper publisher, founded in 1890, it took the name Odhams Press
Odhams Press
Ltd in 1920 when it merged with John Bull magazine. By 1937 it had founded the first colour weekly, Woman, for which it set up and operated a dedicated high-speed print works. The company also owned Ideal Home (founded 1920) and acquired the equestrian magazine Horse and Hound. Later, Odhams expanded into book publishing, for example publishing Winston Churchill's Painting as a Pastime, Rupert Gunnis's Dictionary of British Sculptors 1660–1851, and an edition of the complete works of William Shakespeare. Throughout the 1960s, Odhams Books Ltd (likewise founded by Odhams Press) operated the Companion Book Club (CBC)
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Conscientious Objector
Military service National service Conscription
Conscription
crisis Conscientious objector Alternative civilian service Conscription
Conscription
by countryv t eA conscientious objector is an "individual who has claimed the right to refuse to perform military service"[1] on the grounds of freedom of thought, conscience, or religion.[2] In some countries, conscientious objectors are assigned to an alternative civilian service as a substitute for conscription or military service
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George Lansbury
George Lansbury
George Lansbury
(22 February 1859 – 7 May 1940) was a British politician and social reformer who led the Labour Party from 1932 to 1935. Apart from a brief period of ministerial office during the Labour government of 1929–31, he spent his political life campaigning against established authority and vested interests, his main causes being the promotion of social justice, women's rights and world disarmament. Originally a radical Liberal, Lansbury became a socialist in the early-1890s, and thereafter served his local community in the East End of London
East End of London
in numerous elective offices. His activities were underpinned by his Christian beliefs which, except for a short period of doubt, sustained him through his life
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National Guilds League
Guild
Guild
socialism is a political movement advocating workers' control of industry through the medium of trade-related guilds "in an implied contractual relationship with the public".[1] It originated in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and was at its most influential in the first quarter of the 20th century. It was strongly associated with G. D. H
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G. D. H. Cole
George Douglas Howard Cole (25 September 1889 – 14 January 1959) was an English political theorist, economist, writer and historian. As a libertarian socialist he was a long-time member of the Fabian Society and an advocate for the co-operative movement.Contents1 Early life 2 First World War 3 Professional Life 4 Socialism 5 Co-operative studies 6 Personal life 7 Bibliography7.1 Non-fiction works 7.2 Detective stories8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Cole was born in Cambridge, to George Cole, a jeweller who later became a surveyor, and his wife, Jessie Knowles.[3] Cole was educated at St Paul's School and Balliol College, Oxford where he achieved double firsts.[4] First World War[edit] As a conscientious objector during the First World War, Cole's involvement in the campaign against conscription introduced him to a co-worker, Margaret Postgate, whom he married in 1918
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Guild Socialist
Guild
Guild
socialism is a political movement advocating workers' control of industry through the medium of trade-related guilds "in an implied contractual relationship with the public".[1] It originated in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and was at its most influential in the first quarter of the 20th century. It was strongly associated with G. D. H
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK or U.K.)[15] or Britain,[note 11] is a sovereign country located off the north­western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north­eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands.[16] Northern Ireland
Ireland
is the only part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland
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Left-wing
Left-wing politics
Left-wing politics
supports social equality and egalitarianism, often in opposition to social hierarchy.[1][2][3][4] It typically involves a concern for those in society whom its adherents perceive as disadvantaged relative to others (prioritarianism) as well as a belief that there are unjustified inequalities that need to be reduced or abolished (by advocating for social justice).[1] The term left-wing can also refer to "the radical, reforming, or socialist section of a political party or system".[5] The political terms "Left" and "Right" were coined during the French Revolution (1789–1799), referring to the seating arrangement in the Estates General: those who sat on the left generally opposed the monarchy and supported the revolution, including the creation of a republic and secularization,[6] while those on the right were supportive of the traditional institutions of the Old Regime
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W. H. Stevenson
William Henry Stevenson (7 September 1858 – 22 October 1924), who wrote as W. H. Stevenson, was an English historian and philologist who specialized in Anglo-Saxon England. Stevenson was born in Nottingham
Nottingham
and went to school in Hull. As a young man he was a researcher for the Nottingham
Nottingham
Borough Council and became a contributor to the English Historical Review
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