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William Carey (missionary)
William Carey (17 August 1761 – 9 June 1834) was a British Christian missionary, Particular Baptist
Particular Baptist
minister, translator, social reformer and cultural anthropologist who founded the Serampore
Serampore
College and the Serampore
Serampore
University, the first degree-awarding university in India.[1] He went to Kolkata
Kolkata
(India) in 1793, but was forced to leave the British Indian territory by non-Baptist Christian missionaries.[2] He joined the Baptist missionaries in the Danish colony of Frederiksnagar in India
India
(Serampore)
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British East India Company
The East India
India
Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India
India
Company and informally as John Company,[1] was an English and later British joint-stock company,[2] that was formed to pursue trade with the "East Indies"[citation needed] (in present-day terms, Maritime Southeast Asia), but ended up trading mainly with Qing China
Qing China
and seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent. Originally chartered as the "Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies", the company rose to account for half of the world's trade[citation needed], particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, saltpetre, tea, and opium
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Jonathan Edwards (theologian)
Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758) was an American revivalist preacher, philosopher, and Congregationalist Protestant theologian. Like most of the Puritans, he held to the Reformed theology. His colonial followers later distinguished themselves from other Congregationalists as "New Lights" (endorsing the Great Awakening), as opposed to "Old Lights" (non-revivalists). Edwards is widely regarded as "one of America's most important and original philosophical theologians". Edwards' theological work is broad in scope, but he was rooted in Reformed
Reformed
theology, the metaphysics of theological determinism, and the Puritan
Puritan
heritage
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Botany
Botany, also called plant science(s), plant biology or phytology, is the science of plant life and a branch of biology. A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word βοτάνη (botanē) meaning "pasture", "grass", or "fodder"; βοτάνη is in turn derived from βόσκειν (boskein), "to feed" or "to graze".[1][2][3] Traditionally, botany has also included the study of fungi and algae by mycologists and phycologists respectively, with the study of these three groups of organisms remaining within the sphere of interest of the International Botanical Congress
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Dissenter
A dissenter (from the Latin dissentire, “to disagree”), is one who disagrees in matters of opinion, belief, etc. In the social and religious history of England
England
and Wales, and, by extension, Ireland, however, it refers particularly to a member of a religious body who has, for one reason or another, separated from the Established Church or any other kind of Protestant
Protestant
who refuses to recognise the supremacy of the Established Church
Established Church
in areas where the established Church is or was Anglican.[1][2] Originally, the term included English and Welsh Roman Catholics[1] whom the original draft of the Nonconformist Relief Act 1779 styled "Protesting Catholic Dissenters". In practice, however, it designates Protestant
Protestant
Dissenters referred to in sec. ii
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Congregational Church
Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. In the United States and the United Kingdom, many Congregational churches claim their descent from Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian and English separatist Robert Browne in 1582.[1] Ideas of nonconforming Protestants during the Puritan
Puritan
Reformation
Reformation
of the Church of England
Church of England
laid foundation for these churches. In England, the early Congregationalists were called Separatists or Independents to distinguish them from the similarly Calvinistic Presbyterians, whose churches embrace a polity based on the governance of elders
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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James Cook
Captain James Cook
James Cook
FRS (7 November 1728[NB 1] – 14 February 1779) was a British explorer, navigator, cartographer, and captain in the Royal Navy. Cook made detailed maps of Newfoundland prior to making three voyages to the Pacific Ocean, during which he achieved the first recorded European contact with the eastern coastline of Australia
Australia
and the Hawaiian Islands, and the first recorded circumnavigation of New Zealand. Cook joined the British merchant navy as a teenager and joined the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in 1755. He saw action in the Seven Years' War, and subsequently surveyed and mapped much of the entrance to the Saint Lawrence River during the siege of Quebec. This helped bring Cook to the attention of the Admiralty
Admiralty
and Royal Society
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Gospel
Gospel
Gospel
is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".[1] It originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[2][Notes 1] The four gospels of the New Testament
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John Collett Ryland
John Collett Ryland
John Collett Ryland
(1723–1792) was an English Baptist
Baptist
minister and author.John Collett Ryland, 1778 engraving by Carington BowlesContents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 Notes 5 Further readingLife[edit] The son of Joseph Ryland, a farmer of Lower Ditchford in Gloucestershire, and Freelove Collett of Slaughter, he was born at Bourton-on-the-Water
Bourton-on-the-Water
on 12 October 1723. He was baptised in 1741 by Benjamin Beddome, who sent him about 1744 to Bernard Foskett's dissenting academy at Bristol
Bristol
to prepare for the Baptist
Baptist
ministry. He left Bristol
Bristol
in 1750 to be pastor of the Baptist
Baptist
church at Warwick, where he had already preached for four or five years. Here he kept school in St
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Leicester
Coordinates: 52°38′N 1°8′W / 52.633°N 1.133°W / 52.633; -1.133LeicesterFlagCoat of armsMotto(s): "Semper Eadem" Constant / Always the Same / "'the Eternal Urbs'" Location within Leicestershire
Leicestershire
and EnglandLeicesterLocation of Leicester
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Gospel Of Matthew
The Gospel
Gospel
According to Matthew (Greek: Τὸ κατὰ Ματθαῖον εὐαγγέλιον, translit. Tò katà Matthaīon euangélion; also called the Gospel
Gospel
of Matthew or simply, Matthew) is the first book of the New Testament
New Testament
and one of the three synoptic gospels
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