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Will Eisner
William Erwin "Will" Eisner (/ˈaɪznər/; March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an American cartoonist, writer, and entrepreneur. He was one of the earliest cartoonists to work in the American comic book industry, and his series The Spirit
The Spirit
(1940–1952) was noted for its experiments in content and form. In 1978, he popularized the term "graphic novel" with the publication of his book A Contract with God. He was an early contributor to formal comics studies with his book Comics and Sequential Art
Comics and Sequential Art
(1985)
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Brooklyn
Coordinates: 40°41′34″N 73°59′25″W / 40.69278°N 73.99028°W / 40.69278; -73.99028Brooklyn Kings CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateClockwise from top left: Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Bridge, Brooklyn
Brooklyn
brownstones,
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Batman
Batman
Batman
is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character was created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger,[4][5] and first appeared in Detective Comics #27 (1939). Originally named the "Bat-Man", the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, and the World's Greatest Detective.[6] Batman's secret identity is Bruce Wayne, a wealthy American playboy, philanthropist, and owner of Wayne Enterprises. After witnessing the murder of his parents Dr. Thomas Wayne
Thomas Wayne
and Martha Wayne
Martha Wayne
as a child, he swore vengeance against criminals, an oath tempered by a sense of justice
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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School Newspaper
A student publication is a media outlet such as a newspaper, magazine, television show, or radio station produced by students at an educational institution. These publications typically cover local and school related news, but they may also report on national or international news as well. Most student publications are either part of a curricular class or run as an extracurricular activity.[1] Student publications serve as both a platform for community discussion and a place for those interested in journalism to develop their skills. These publications report news, publish opinions of students and faculty, and may run advertisements catered to the student body. Besides these purposes, student publications also serve as a watchdog to uncover problems at the school. The majority of student publications are funded through their educational institution. Some funds may be generated through sales and advertisements, but the majority usually comes from the school itself
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Yearbook
A yearbook, also known as an annual, is a type of a book published annually to record, highlight, and commemorate the past year of a school. The term also refers to a book of statistics or facts published annually. Many high schools, colleges, and elementary and middle schools publish yearbooks; however, many schools are dropping yearbooks or decreasing page counts given social media alternatives to a mass-produced physical photographically-oriented record.[1] From 1995 to 2013, the number of U.S. college yearbooks dropped from roughly 2,400 to 1,000.[2]Contents1 U.S. schools 2 Australia2.1 Publishing3 India 4 South Africa 5 Nigeria 6 U.S
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Lauderdale Lakes, Florida
Lauderdale Lakes, officially the City of Lauderdale Lakes, is a city in Broward County, Florida, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 32,593. It is part of the Miami–Fort Lauderdale–West Palm Beach Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is home to 5,564,635 people.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Government 5 Media 6 Economy 7 Education7.1 Elementary 7.2 Middle 7.3 High8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The city of Lauderdale Lakes was incorporated on June 22, 1961, and was originally popular as a retirement area for Northeasterners, notably New Yorkers who were Jewish
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Art Students League Of New York
The Art Students League of New York
Art Students League of New York
is an art school located on West 57th Street in Manhattan, New York City, New York. The League has historically been known for its broad appeal to both amateurs and professional artists and for over 130 years has maintained a tradition of offering reasonably priced classes on a flexible schedule to accommodate students from all walks of life. Although artists may study full-time, there have never been any degree programs or grades, and this informal attitude pervades the culture of the school. From the 19th century to the present, the League has counted among its attendees and instructors many historically important artists, and contributed to numerous influential schools and movements in the art world. The League also maintains a significant permanent collection of student and faculty work, and publishes an online journal of writing on art-related topics, entitled LINEA
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New York American
The New York Journal-American
New York Journal-American
was a daily newspaper published in New York City from 1937 to 1966. The Journal-American was the product of a merger between two New York newspapers owned by William Randolph Hearst: The New York American (originally the New York Journal, renamed American in 1901), a morning paper, and the New York Evening Journal, an afternoon paper. Both were published by Hearst from 1895 to 1937. The American and Evening Journal merged in 1937. The Journal-American was a publication with several editions in the afternoon and evening.Contents1 Circulation war 2 Comics 3 Reporters 4 Columnists 5 Staff 6 Photographs 7 Decline 8 Merger 9 Archives 10 Gallery 11 References 12 External linksCirculation war[edit] Joseph Pulitzer's younger brother Albert founded the New York Morning Journal in 1882. John R
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H. Rider Haggard
Sir Henry Rider Haggard, KBE, Kt (/ˈhæɡərd/; 22 June 1856 – 14 May 1925), known as H. Rider Haggard, was an English writer of adventure novels set in exotic locations, predominantly Africa, and a pioneer of the Lost World literary genre.[1] He was also involved in agricultural reform throughout the British Empire. His stories, situated at the lighter end of Victorian literature, continue to be popular and influential.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Early years 1.2 South Africa, 1875–1882 1.3 Haggard in England, 1882–1925 1.4 Aid for Lilly Archer 1.5 Public affairs and honours 1.6 Death2 Writing career 3 Reputation and legacy 4 Films 5 Influence on children's literature in the 19th century 6 Bibliography 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksLife and career[edit] Early years[edit] Henry Rider Haggard, generally known as H. Rider Haggard
H

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Man Ray
Man Ray
Man Ray
(born Emmanuel Radnitzky; August 27, 1890 – November 18, 1976) was an American visual artist who spent most of his career in France. He was a significant contributor to the Dada
Dada
and Surrealist movements, although his ties to each were informal. He produced major works in a variety of media but considered himself a painter above all. He was best known for his photography, and he was a renowned fashion and portrait photographer
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Pirate
Piracy
Piracy
is an act of robbery or criminal violence by ship or boat-borne attackers upon another ship or a coastal area, typically with the goal of stealing cargo and other valuable items or properties. Those who engage in acts of piracy are called pirates. The earliest documented instances of piracy were in the 14th century BC, when the Sea Peoples, a group of ocean raiders, attacked the ships of the Aegean and Mediterranean
Mediterranean
civilizations. Narrow channels which funnel shipping into predictable routes have long created opportunities for piracy,[1] as well as for privateering and commerce raiding
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Secret Agent
Espionage
Espionage
(colloquially, spying) is the obtaining of secret or confidential information without the permission of the holder of the information. Spies help agencies uncover secret information.[1] Any individual or spy ring (a cooperating group of spies), in the service of a government, company or independent operation, can commit espionage. The practice is clandestine, as it is by definition unwelcome and in many cases illegal and punishable by law. Espionage is a subset of "intelligence" gathering, which includes espionage as well as information gathering from public sources. Espionage
Espionage
is often part of an institutional effort by a government or commercial concern. However, the term tends to associate with state spying on potential or actual enemies for military purposes
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Mafia
A mafia (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmaːfja]) is a type of organized crime syndicate whose primary activities are protection racketeering, the arbitration of disputes between criminals, and the organizing and oversight of illegal agreements and transactions.[1] Mafias often engage in secondary activities such as gambling, loan sharking, drug-trafficking, prostitution, and fraud. The term "Mafia" was originally applied to the Sicilian Mafia
Sicilian Mafia
and originates in Sicily, but it has since expanded to encompass other organizations of similar methods and purpose, e.g., "the Russian Mafia" or "the Japanese Mafia". The term is applied informally by the press and public; the criminal organizations themselves have their own terms (e.g
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Damon Runyon
Alfred Damon Runyon
Damon Runyon
(October 4, 1880[1][2] – December 10, 1946) was an American newspaperman and short story writer.[3] He was best known for his short stories celebrating the world of Broadway in New York City that grew out of the Prohibition era. To New Yorkers of his generation, a " Damon Runyon
Damon Runyon
character" evoked a distinctive social type from the Brooklyn
Brooklyn
or Midtown demi-monde. The adjective "Runyonesque" refers to this type of character as well as to the type of situations and dialog that Runyon depicted.[4] He spun humorous and sentimental tales of gamblers, hustlers, actors, and gangsters, few of whom go by "square" names, preferring instead colorful monikers such as "Nathan Detroit", "Benny Southstreet", "Big Jule", "Harry the Horse", "Good Time Charley", "Dave the Dude", or "The Seldom Seen Kid"
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Fiction House
Fiction House
Fiction House
was an American publisher of pulp magazines and comic books that existed from the 1920s to the 1950s. It was founded by John B. "Jack" Kelly and John W. Glenister.[1] By the late 1930s, the publisher was Thurman T. Scott. Its comics division was best known for its pinup-style good girl art, as epitomized by the company's most popular character, Sheena, Queen of the Jungle.Contents1 Leadership and location 2 History2.1 Pulp fiction 2.2 Comic books3 List of Fiction House
Fiction House
pulps 4 List of Fiction House
Fiction House
comic books (selected)4.1 "The Big Six" 4.2 Other titles5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLeadership and location[edit] The company's original location was 461 Eighth Avenue in New York City.[1] At the end of 1929, a New York Times article referred to John B
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