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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic
The Atlantic
is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts. The magazine was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine, and published leading writers' commentary on abolition, education, and other major issues in contemporary political affairs. The magazine's initiator, and one of the founders, was Francis H. Underwood,[3][4] The other founding sponsors were prominent writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Greenleaf Whittier.[5][6] James Russell Lowell
James Russell Lowell
was its first editor.[7] After struggling with financial hardship and a series of ownership changes since the late 20th century, the magazine was reformatted in the early 21st century as a general editorial magazine
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Internet Bot
An Internet
Internet
Bot, also known as web robot, WWW robot or simply bot, is a software application that runs automated tasks (scripts) over the Internet.[1] Typically, bots perform tasks that are both simple and structurally repetitive, at a much higher rate than would be possible for a human alone. The largest use of bots is in web spidering (web crawler), in which an automated script fetches, analyzes and files information from web servers at many times the speed of a human. More than half of all web traffic is made up of bots.[2] Efforts by servers hosting websites to counteract bots vary. Servers may choose to outline rules on the behaviour of internet bots by implementing a robots.txt file: this file is simply text stating the rules governing a bot's behaviour on that server. Any bot interacting with (or 'spidering') any server that does not follow these rules should, in theory, be denied access to, or removed from, the affected website
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Open Data In Canada
Open data
Open data
in Canada describes the capacity for the Canadian Federal Government and other levels of government in Canada to provide online access to data collected and created by governments in a standards-compliant Web 2.0
Web 2.0
way
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Open Data
Open data
Open data
is the idea that some data should be freely available to everyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control.[1] The goals of the open data movement are similar to those of other "open" movements such as open source, open hardware, open content, open government, open access, and open science
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Open Data In The United States
Open data
Open data
in the United States
United States
refers to the Federal government of the United States' perspectives, policies, and practices regarding open data.Contents1 History 2 Value of US government
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The Register
The Register
The Register
(nicknamed El Reg) is a British technology news and opinion website co-founded in 1994 by Mike Magee, John Lettice and Ross Alderson.[2] Situation Publishing Ltd is listed as the site's publisher. Drew Cullen is an owner, Linus Birtles the managing director and Andrew Orlowski
Andrew Orlowski
is the Executive Editor.Contents1 History 2 Readership and content 3 Intel
Intel
chips flaw investigation 4 Controversies 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Register
The Register
was founded in London
London
as an email newsletter called Chip Connection
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WebCite
WebCite is an on-demand archiving service, designed to digitally preserve scientific and educationally important material on the web by making snapshots of Internet contents as they existed at the time when a blogger, or a scholar or a editor cited or quoted from it. The preservation service enables verifiability of claims supported by the cited sources even when the original web pages are being revised, removed, or disappear for other reasons, an effect known as link rot.[3]Contents1 Comparison to other services 2 History 3 Fundraising 4 Process 5 Business model5.1 DMCA
DMCA
requests6 Copyright issues 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksComparison to other services[edit] The service differs from the short time Google Cache copies by having indefinite archiving and by offering on-the-fly archiving
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Open Data In France
Online access to legal information was implemented in France
France
in 1999[1] and complemented in 2002.[2] In that regard, France
France
has been at the forefront of Open Data in Europe. Civic groups like
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Open Data In The United Kingdom
There have been campaigns in the United Kingdom for its government to open up the large amounts of data it has for greater public usage without prohibitively large fees. Currently[when?] some UK public sector data are released under a Creative Commons compatible licence. Crown Copyright has been a long-standing copyright protection applied to official works, and at times artistic works, produced under royal or official supervision. The Guardian
The Guardian
newspaper's Technology section began a "Free Our Data" campaign, calling for data gathered by authorities at public expense to be made freely available for reuse by individuals. In 2010 with the creation of the Open Government Licence and the Data.gov.uk
Data.gov.uk
site it appeared that the campaign had been mostly successful. On 12 January 2011 the Coalition Government revealed that it was planning to establish a Public Data Corporation (PDC)
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Open Energy System Databases
Open energy system database projects employ open data methods to collect, clean, and republish energy-related datasets for open use. The resulting information is then available, given a suitable open license, for statistical analysis and for building numerical energy system models, including open energy system models. Permissive licenses like Creative Commons
Creative Commons
CC0
CC0
and CC BY
CC BY
are preferred, but some projects will house data made public under market transparency regulations and carrying unqualified copyright. The databases themselves may furnish information on national power plant fleets, renewable generation assets, transmission networks, time series for electricity loads, dispatch, spot prices, and cross-boarder trades, weather information, and similar
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Open Access
Open access
Open access
(OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g
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Morse Code
Morse code
Morse code
is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment. It is named for Samuel F. B. Morse, an inventor of the telegraph. The International Morse Code[1] encodes the ISO basic Latin alphabet, some extra Latin letters, the Arabic numerals
Arabic numerals
and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals (prosigns) as standardized sequences of short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes",[1] or "dits" and "dahs", as in amateur radio practice. Because many non-English natural languages use more than the 26 Roman letters, extensions to the Morse alphabet exist for those languages. Each Morse code
Morse code
symbol represents either a text character (letter or numeral) or a prosign and is represented by a unique sequence of dots and dashes
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Search Engine Optimization
Search engine optimization
Search engine optimization
(SEO) is the process of affecting the online visibility of a website or a web page in a web search engine's unpaid results—often referred to as "natural", "organic", or "earned" results. In general, the earlier (or higher ranked on the search results page), and more frequently a website appears in the search results list, the more visitors it will receive from the search engine's users; these visitors can then be converted into customers.[1] SEO may target different kinds of search, including image search, video search, academic search,[2] news search, and industry-specific vertical search engines. SEO differs from local search engine optimization in that the latter is focused on optimizing a business' online presence so that its web pages will be displayed by search engines when a user enters a local search for its products or services
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Open Content
Open content
Open content
is a neologism coined by David Wiley in 1998[1] which describes a creative work that others can copy or modify freely, without asking for permission. The term evokes the related concept of open-source software.[2] Such content is said to be under an open licence.Contents1 History 2 "Open content" definition 3 Open access 4 Open content
Open content
and education4.1 Textbooks5 Licenses 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Originally, the Open content
Open content
concept and term was evangelized via the Open Content Project
Open Content Project
by David A. Wiley
David A

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Open Notebook Science
Open notebook science
Open notebook science
is the practice of making the entire primary record of a research project publicly available online as it is recorded. This involves placing the personal, or laboratory, notebook of the researcher online along with all raw and processed data, and any associated material, as this material is generated. The approach may be summed up by the slogan 'no insider information'. It is the logical extreme of transparent approaches to research and explicitly includes the making available of failed, less significant, and otherwise unpublished experiments; so called 'dark data'.[1] The practice of open notebook science, although not the norm in the academic community, has gained significant recent attention in the research[2][3] and general[1][4] media as part of a general trend towards more open approaches in research practice and publishing
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