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Wig
A wig is a head covering made from human hair, animal hair, or synthetic fiber. The word wig is short for periwig and first appeared in the English language around 1675.[citation needed] Some people wear wigs to disguise baldness; a wig may be used as a less intrusive and less expensive alternative to medical therapies for restoring hair.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient use 1.2 16th and 17th centuries 1.3 18th century 1.4 19th and 20th centuries2 Military wigs 3 Merkin 4 Current usage4.1 Image gallery5 Manufacture5.1 Measurement 5.2 Foundation 5.3 Hair preparation 5.4 Adding the hair 5.5 Styling 5.6 Fitting 5.7 Types of human hair wigs6 Notable wig designers 7 See also 8 References 9 Further readingHistory[edit] Ancient use[edit] In Egyptian society men and women commonly had clean shaven or close cropped hair and often wore wigs.[1][2] The ancient Egyptians created the wig to shield shaved, hairless heads from the sun
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Commonwealth Of Nations
The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
of Nations[2] (formerly the British Commonwealth),[3][1] also known as simply the Commonwealth, is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states that are mostly former territories of the British Empire.[4] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
operates by intergovernmental consensus of the member states, organised through the Commonwealth Secretariat and non-governmental organisations, organised through the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
Foundation.[5] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
dates back to the mid-20th century with the decolonisation of the British Empire
British Empire
through increased self-governance of its territories
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Head Louse
Pediculus
Pediculus
capitis (De Geer, 1767)The head louse ( Pediculus
Pediculus
humanus capitis) is an obligate ectoparasite of humans that causes head lice infestation (pediculosis capitis).[1] Head
Head
lice are wingless insects spending their entire lives on the human scalp and feeding exclusively on human blood.[1] Humans are the only known hosts of this specific parasite, while chimpanzees host a closely related species, Pediculus
Pediculus
schaeffi
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Head Lice
Pediculus
Pediculus
capitis (De Geer, 1767)The head louse ( Pediculus
Pediculus
humanus capitis) is an obligate ectoparasite of humans that causes head lice infestation (pediculosis capitis).[1] Head
Head
lice are wingless insects spending their entire lives on the human scalp and feeding exclusively on human blood.[1] Humans are the only known hosts of this specific parasite, while chimpanzees host a closely related species, Pediculus
Pediculus
schaeffi
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Elizabeth I Of England
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)[1] was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana
Gloriana
or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last monarch of the House of Tudor. Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth. Anne's marriage to Henry VIII
Henry VIII
was annulled, and Elizabeth was declared illegitimate. Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey
and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary. Edward's will was set aside and Mary became queen, deposing Lady Jane Grey
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Louis XIV Of France
Louis XIV (5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the God-Given (Louis Dieudonné), Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who reigned as King of France
King of France
from 1643 until his death in 1715. Starting at the age of 4, his reign of 72 years and 110 days is the longest recorded of any monarch of a sovereign country in European history.[1][2] In the age of absolutism in Europe, Louis XIV's France was a leader in the growing centralization of power.[3] Louis began his personal rule of France
France
in 1661, after the death of his chief minister, the Italian Cardinal Mazarin.[4] An adherent of the concept of the divine right of kings, which advocates the divine origin of monarchical rule, Louis continued his predecessors' work of creating a centralized state governed from the capital
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Charles II Of England
Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685)[c] was king of England, Scotland and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death. Charles II's father, Charles I, was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. Although the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands
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Restoration (England)
The Restoration of the English monarchy
English monarchy
took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II
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Barber
A barber (from the Latin
Latin
barba, "beard") is a person whose occupation is mainly to cut, dress, groom, style and shave men’s and boys' hair. A barber's place of work is known as a "barber shop" or a "barber's". Barber
Barber
shops are also places of social interaction and public discourse. In some instances, barbershops are also public forums. They are the locations of open debates, voicing public concerns, and engaging citizens in discussions about contemporary issues. They were also influential in helping shape male identity.[citation needed] In previous times, barbers (known as barber surgeons) also performed surgery and dentistry
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Black Death
The Black Death, also known as the Black Plague, Great Plague or simply Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia
Eurasia
and peaking in Europe
Europe
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Westminster
Westminster
Westminster
(/ˈwɛsmɪnstər, ˈwɛst-/) is an area of central London within the City of Westminster, part of the West End, on the north bank of the River Thames.[1] Westminster's concentration of visitor attractions and historic landmarks, one of the highest in London, includes the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey
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Starch
Starch
Starch
or amylum is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds. This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as energy storage. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods like potatoes, wheat, maize (corn), rice, and cassava. Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. It consists of two types of molecules: the linear and helical amylose and the branched amylopectin. Depending on the plant, starch generally contains 20 to 25% amylose and 75 to 80% amylopectin by weight.[4] Glycogen, the glucose store of animals, is a more highly branched version of amylopectin. In industry, starch is converted into sugars, for example by malting, and fermented to produce ethanol in the manufacture of beer, whisky and biofuel. It is processed to produce many of the sugars used in processed foods
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Korea
Korea
Korea
(/kəˈriːə/) is a historical region in East Asia; since 1945, it has been divided into two distinct sovereign states: North Korea (officially the "Democratic People's Republic of Korea") and South Korea
Korea
(officially the "Republic of Korea"). Located on the Korean Peninsula, Korea
Korea
is bordered by China
China
to the northwest and Russia
Russia
to the northeast. It is separated from Japan
Japan
to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan
Japan
(East Sea). Korea
Korea
emerged as a singular political entity in 676 AD, after centuries of conflict among the Three Kingdoms of Korea, which were unified as Unified Silla
Unified Silla
to the south and Balhae
Balhae
to the north
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Lavender
Lavandula
Lavandula
(common name lavender) is a genus of 47 known species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World
Old World
and is found from Cape Verde
Cape Verde
and the Canary Islands, Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. Many members of the genus are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, for use as culinary herbs, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils
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Orris Root
Orris root
Orris root
(rhizoma iridis) is a term used for the roots Iris germanica and Iris pallida.Contents1 Constituent chemicals 2 Uses 3 Preparation 4 In perfume 5 In cuisine 6 ReferencesConstituent chemicals[edit] The chief ingredient of Orris root
Orris root
is oil of Orris (0.1–0.2%) a yellow-white mass which contains myristic acid. Oil of Orris can also be found as Orris Butter. Other components include, fat, resin, starch, mucilage, bitter extractive and a glucoside called 'Iridin' or 'Irisin'.[1] Uses[edit] Once important in western herbal medicine, it is now used mainly as a fixative and base note in perfumery, the most widely used fixative for potpourri. Orris is also an ingredient in many brands of gin.[2] Fabienne Pavia, in her book L'univers des Parfums (1995, ed. Solar), states that in the manufacturing of perfumes using orris, the scent of the iris root differs from that of the flower
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George III
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738[c] – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain
King of Great Britain
and King of Ireland
King of Ireland
from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland until his death. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick- Lüneburg
Lüneburg
("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
before becoming King of Hanover
King of Hanover
on 12 October 1814
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