HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Wide-angle Lens
In photography and cinematography, a wide-angle lens refers to a lens whose focal length is substantially smaller than the focal length of a normal lens for a given film plane. This type of lens allows more of the scene to be included in the photograph, which is useful in architectural, interior and landscape photography where the photographer may not be able to move farther from the scene to photograph it. Another use is where the photographer wishes to emphasise the difference in size or distance between objects in the foreground and the background; nearby objects appear very large and objects at a moderate distance appear small and far away. This exaggeration of relative size can be used to make foreground objects more prominent and striking, while capturing expansive backgrounds.[1] A wide angle lens is also one that projects a substantially larger image circle than would be typical for a standard design lens of the same focal length
[...More...]

picture info

Nikon D610
The Nikon
Nikon
D610 is a full-frame DSLR
DSLR
camera announced by Nikon
Nikon
on October 8, 2013
[...More...]

Canon EOS 5DS
The Canon EOS 5DS and EOS 5DS R (known as the EOS 5Ds and EOS 5Ds R in Japan) are two closely related digital SLR cameras announced by Canon on February 6, 2015. Both are professional full-frame cameras with 50.6-megapixel sensors, the highest of any full-frame camera at the time of announcement
[...More...]

picture info

Anamorphic Lens
Anamorphic format
Anamorphic format
is the cinematography technique of shooting a widescreen picture on standard 35 mm film
35 mm film
or other visual recording media with a non-widescreen native aspect ratio. It also refers to the projection format in which a distorted image is "stretched" by an anamorphic projection lens to recreate the original aspect ratio on the viewing screen. (It should not be confused with anamorphic widescreen, a different video encoding concept that uses similar principles but different means.) The word anamorphic and its derivatives stem from the Greek words meaning "formed again"
[...More...]

picture info

Image Stitching
Image
Image
stitching or photo stitching is the process of combining multiple photographic images with overlapping fields of view to produce a segmented panorama or high-resolution image. Commonly performed through the use of computer software, most approaches to image stitching require nearly exact overlaps between images and identical exposures to produce seamless results,[1][2] although some stitching algorithms actually benefit from differently exposed images by doing HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging in regions of overlap.[3][4] Some digital cameras can stitch their photos internally
[...More...]

Full-frame Digital SLR
The term full frame is used by users of digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLRs) as a shorthand for an image sensor format which is the same size as 35mm format (36 mm × 24 mm) film.[1][2] Historically, 35mm was considered a small film format compared with medium format, large format and even larger. This is in contrast to cameras with smaller sensors (for instance, those with a size equivalent to APS-C-size film), much smaller than a full 35mm frame. Currently, the majority of digital cameras, both compact and SLR models, use a smaller-than-35 mm frame, as it is easier and cheaper to manufacture imaging sensors at a smaller size. Historically, the earliest digital SLR models, such as the Nikon NASA F4 or Kodak DCS 100, also used a smaller sensor
[...More...]

picture info

Four Thirds System
The Four Thirds System
Four Thirds System
is a standard created by Olympus and Eastman Kodak
Kodak
for digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR) and mirrorless camera design and development.[1] The system provides a standard that, with digital cameras and lenses available from multiple manufacturers, allows for the interchange of lenses and bodies from different manufacturers. U.S. Patent 6,910,814 seems to cover the standard. Proponents describe it as an open standard, but companies may only use it under a non-disclosure agreement.[2] Unlike older single-lens reflex (SLR) systems, Four Thirds was designed from the start to be entirely digital. Many lenses are extensively computerised, to the point that Olympus offers firmware updates for many of them. Lens design has been tailored to the requirements of digital sensors, most notably through telecentric designs
[...More...]

picture info

Advanced Photo System
Advanced Photo System
Advanced Photo System
(APS) is a discontinued film format for still photography first produced in 1996. It was marketed by Eastman Kodak under the brand name Advantix, by FujiFilm
FujiFilm
under the name Nexia, by Agfa under the name Futura and by Konica
Konica
as Centuria.Contents1 Design 2 Film and cartridge 3 Information exchange 4 Processing 5 Cameras 6 Adoption 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksDesign[edit]A typical low-end, fixed-focus[1] APS compact cameraThe film is 24 mm wide, and has three image formats:H for "High Definition" (30.2 × 16.7 mm; aspect ratio 16:9; 4×7" print) C for "Classic" (25.1 × 16.7 mm; aspect ratio 3:2; 4×6" print) P for "Panoramic" (30.2 × 9.5 mm; aspect ratio 3:1; 4×11" print)The "C" and "P" formats are formed by cropping
[...More...]

picture info

Barrel Distortion
Tilt Spherical aberration Astigmatism Coma Distortion Petzval field curvature Chromatic aberrationWine glasses create non-uniform distortion of their backgroundIn geometric optics, distortion is a deviation from rectilinear projection; a projection in which straight lines in a scene remain straight in an image. It is a form of optical aberration.Contents1 Radial distortion1.1 Occurrence 1.2 Chromatic aberration 1.3 Origin of terms2 Software correction2.1 Calibrated 2.2 Manual3 Related phenomena 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksRadial distortion[edit] Although distortion can be irregular or follow many patterns, the most commonly encountered distortions are radially symmetric, or approximately so, arising from the symmetry of a photographic lens. These radial distortions can usually be classified as either barrel distortions or pincushion distortions
[...More...]

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Canon EOS-1D X
The Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-1D
X is a professional digital SLR camera body by Canon Inc. It succeeded the company's previous flagship Canon EOS-1Ds
Canon EOS-1Ds
Mark III and the Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-1D
Mark IV. It was announced on 18 October 2011.[4] It was released in March 2012 with a suggested retail price of US$6,799.00 (body only)[5] and a suggested retail price of £5,299 in the United Kingdom.[6] The camera is supplemented by the Canon EOS-1D
Canon EOS-1D
C, a movie-oriented camera that shares most of its still photographic features with the 1D X
[...More...]

picture info

135 Film
135 is photographic film in a film format used for still photography. It is a cartridge film with a film gauge of 35 mm (1.4 in), typically used for hand-held photography in 35 mm film cameras. Its engineering standard for the film is controlled by ISO 1007.[1] The term 135 (ISO 1007) was introduced by Kodak
Kodak
in 1934[2] as a designation for the cassette for 35 mm film, specifically for still photography. It quickly grew in popularity, surpassing 120 film
120 film
by the late 1960s to become the most popular photographic film size. Despite competition from formats such as 828, 126, 110, and APS, it remains so today. 135 camera film always comes perforated with Kodak
Kodak
Standard perforations. The size of the 135 film
135 film
frame has been adopted by many high-end digital single-lens reflex and digital mirrorless cameras, commonly referred to as "full frame"
[...More...]

picture info

Canon EOS 5D Mark III
The Canon EOS
Canon EOS
5D Mark III is a professional grade 22.3 megapixels full-frame digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera made by Canon. Succeeding the EOS 5D Mark II, it was announced on 2 March 2012,[5] the 25th anniversary of the announcement of the first camera in the EOS line, the EOS 650, and was also Canon's 75th anniversary.[6] The Mark III went on sale later in March with a retail price of $3,499 in the US, £2999 in the UK, and €3569 in the Eurozone.[7] On 25 August 2016, Canon announced the camera's successor, the Canon EOS 5D Mark IV.[3]Contents1 Features 2 Known defects 3 Firmware
[...More...]

picture info

Canon EOS 6D
The Canon EOS
Canon EOS
6D is a 20.2-megapixel full-frame CMOS
CMOS
digital single-lens reflex camera made by Canon. The EOS 6D was publicly announced on 17 September 2012, one day before the start of the Photokina 2012
Photokina 2012
trade show
[...More...]

picture info

Nikon D750
The Nikon
Nikon
D750 is a full-frame DSLR camera announced by Nikon
Nikon
on September 12, 2014. It is the first in a new line[3] of Nikon
Nikon
FX format cameras which includes technologies from the D810 in a smaller and lighter body.[4] Nikon
Nikon
sees the D750 with "advanced video features" for videographers as well as a primary or secondary camera for fast handling and speed. The camera can shoot at 6.5 fps at full resolution.[5] It has a newly developed 24.3-effective-megapixel image sensor (24.93 megapixel raw) with claimed lower image noise. The Expeed
Expeed
4 processor from D4S/D810 and built-in Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
enable functions from the D810
[...More...]

.