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Whiteout (weather)
Whiteout, white-out,[1] or milky weather[2] is a weather condition in which the contours and landmarks in a snow-covered zone become almost indistinguishable.[1] It could be also applied when visibility and contours are greatly reduced by sand. The horizon disappears from view while the sky and landscape appear featureless, leaving no points of visual reference by which to navigate; there is absence of shadows because the light arrives in equal measure from all possible directions.[1] Whiteout has been defined as: "A condition of diffuse light when no shadows are cast, due to a continuous white cloud layer appearing to merge with the white snow surface. No surface irregularities of the snow are visible, but a dark object may be clearly seen
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Mount Lyell (Canada)
Mount Lyell is a mountain on the Alberta-British Columbia border, in western Canada. Comprising five distinct summits, Mount Lyell reaches a height of 3,498 m (11,476 ft).[1] The mountain was named by James Hector in 1858 in recognition of the Scottish geologist, Sir Charles Lyell.[3] Mount Lyell is located on the Great Divide, which forms the BC-Alberta boundary in this area, in Banff National Park. Collectively, the five peaks, and the Mt. Lyell massif itself, are commonly referred to as 'the Lyells'.[2] The mountain is the highest in the Lyell Group, a subrange of the Central Icefields in the Canadian Rockies.[5]
Mt. Lyell and its 5 subpeaks: L1-L5
In 1972, five distinct peaks on Mt
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Mist
Mist is a phenomenon caused by small droplets of water suspended in air. Physically, it is an example of a dispersion. It is most commonly seen where warm, moist air meets sudden cooling, such as in exhaled air in the winter, or when throwing water onto the hot stove of a sauna. It can be created artificially with aerosol canisters if the humidity and temperature conditions are right. It can also occur as part of natural weather, when humid air cools rapidly, for example when the air comes into contact with surfaces that are much cooler than the air. The formation of mist, as of other suspensions, is greatly aided by the presence of nucleation sites on which the suspended water phase can congeal
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Douglas Haig McIntosh
Dr Douglas Haig McIntosh FRSE FRMS OBE (1917–1993) was a 20th-century Scottish meteorologist. He was affectionately known as “Mac”. McIntoch was born in Leven, Fife on 9 September 1917, and, in what was perhaps a patriotic fever during the First World War, named after Douglas Haig, Lord Haig, the commanding officer of the British Army. He studied Science at the University of St Andrews graduating with an MA BSc in 1938, and then joining the staff of the Meteorology Department at the University of Edinburgh. Interrupted by the Second World War he became a meteorological forecaster for RAF Coastal Command in Scotland before being posted to Calcutta in India as Senior Meteorological Officer
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Antarctica

Small-scale "expedition tourism" has existed since 1957 and is currently subject to Antarctic Treaty and Environmental Protocol provisions, but in effect self-regulated by the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators (IAATO). Not all vessels associated with Antarctic tourism are members of IAATO, but IAATO members account for 95% of the tourist activity. Travel is largely by small or medium ship, focusing on specific scenic locations with accessible concentrations of iconic wildlife. A total of 37,506 tourists visited during the 2006–07 Austral summer with nearly all of them coming from commercial ships; 38,478 were recorded in 2015–16.[133][134][135] As of 2015, there are two Wells Fargo ATMs in Antarctica.[136] There has been some concern over the potential adverse environmental and ecosystem effects caused by the influx of visitors
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Kinesthesia
Proprioception (/ˌprpriˈsɛpʃən, -priə-/[1][2] PROH-pree-o-SEP-shən), also referred to as kinaesthesia (or kinesthesia), is the sense of self-movement and body position.[3] It is sometimes described as the "sixth sense".[4] Proprioception is mediated by proprioceptors, mechanosensory neurons located within muscles, tendons, and joints.[3] There are multiple types of proprioceptors which are activated during distinct behaviors and encode distinct types of information: limb velocity and movement, load on a limb, and limb limits
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Landscape
A landscape is the visible features of an area of land, its landforms, and how they integrate with natural or man-made features.[1] A landscape includes the physical elements of geophysically defined landforms such as (ice-capped) mountains, hills, water bodies such as rivers, lakes, ponds and the sea, living elements of land cover including indigenous vegetation, human elements including different forms of land use, buildings, and structures, and transitory elements such as lighting and weather conditions. Combining both their physical origins and the cultural overlay of human presence, often created over millennia, landscapes reflect a living synthesis of people and place that is vital to local and national identity. The character of a landscape helps define the self-image of the people who inhabit it and a sense of place that differentiates one region from other regions. It is the dynamic backdrop to people's lives
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Horizon
The horizon or skyline is the apparent line that separates earth from sky, the line that divides all visible directions into two categories: those that intersect the Earth's surface, and those that do not. The true horizon is actually a theoretical line, which can only be observed when it lies on the sea surface. At many locations, this line is obscured by land, trees, buildings, mountains, etc., and the resulting intersection of earth and sky is called the visible horizon. When looking at a sea from a shore, the part of the sea closest to the horizon is called the offing.[1] The true horizon is horizontal. It surrounds the observer and it is typically assumed to be a circle, drawn on the surface of a perfectly spherical model of the Earth. Its center is below the observer and below sea level. Its distance from the observer varies from day to day due to atmospheric refraction, which is greatly affected by weather conditions
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