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Whitekirk And Tyninghame
Tyninghame and Whitekirk is a civil parish, centred on two small settlements in East Lothian, Scotland.Contents1 Whitekirk1.1 Whitekirk Pilgrimage2 Tyninghame2.1 Tyninghame House3 References3.1 Notes 3.2 Sources4 External links 5 See alsoWhitekirk[edit] Whitekirk is 4 mi (6.4 km) from North Berwick, 8 mi (13 km) from Dunbar
Dunbar
and 25 mi (40 km) east of Edinburgh. A place of Christian worship from the earliest times and known in Old English: Hwīt Cirice, having a holy well, now lost, dedicated to St Mary the Virgin, and a famous statue, likewise dedicated and known as Our Lady of Haddington
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Conventicle
A conventicle is a small, unofficial and unofficiated religious meeting of laypeople.Contents1 England 2 Scotland 3 Finland 4 Germany 5 Japan 6 More recent applications in the United States 7 Conventicles in other religions 8 Notes 9 ReferencesEngland[edit] In England, there were three acts of Parliament passed to coerce people to attend Church of England
Church of England
services and to prohibit unofficiated meeting of laymen: The Religion Act 1592, stated to last for just one parliament, called for imprisonment without bail of those ove
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Codex Calixtinus
The Codex Calixtinus
Codex Calixtinus
(also Compostellus) is the main witness for the 12th-century Liber Sancti Jacobi, or the Book of Saint James. It is a pseudepigraph attributed to Pope Callixtus II; its principal author or compilator is referred to as "Pseudo-Callixtus", often identified with French scholar Aymeric Picaud. Its most likely date of compilation is the period of 1138–1145.[1] It was intended as an anthology of background detail and advice for pilgrims following the Way of St. James to the shrine of the apostle Saint James the Great, located in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain). The collection includes sermons, reports of miracles and liturgical texts associated with Saint James, and a set of polyphonic musical pieces
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Civil Parish
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(/ˈɛdɪnb(ə)rə/ ( listen);[6][7][8] Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Èideann [ˈt̪uːn ˈeːtʲən̪ˠ]; Scots: Edinburgh) is the capital city of Scotland
Scotland
and one of its 32 council areas. It is located in Lothian
Lothian
on the Firth of Forth's southern shore. Recognised as the capital of Scotland
Scotland
since at least the 15th century, Edinburgh
Edinburgh
is the seat of the Scottish Government, the Scottish Parliament and the supreme courts of Scotland. The city's Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarchy in Scotland. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, the city has long been a centre of education, particularly in the fields of medicine, Scots law, literature, the sciences and engineering
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Old English Language
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Holy Well
A holy well or sacred spring is a spring or other small body of water revered either in a Christian
Christian
or pagan context, sometimes both. The term holy well is commonly employed to refer to any water source of limited size (i.e. not a lake or river, but including pools and natural springs and seeps), which has some significance in the folklore of the area where it is located, whether in the form of a particular name, an associated legend, the attribution of healing qualities to the water through the numinous presence of its guardian spirit or Christian
Christian
saint, or a ceremony or ritual centred on the well site
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Mary (mother Of Jesus)
Mary (Greek: Μαρία, translit. María; Aramaic: ܡܪܝܡ‎, translit. Mariam; Hebrew: מִרְיָם‎, translit. Miriam; Coptic: Ⲙⲁⲣⲓⲁ; Arabic: مريم‎, translit. Maryam), also known by various titles, styles and honorifics, was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish[2] woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament[3][4][5][6] and the Quran.[7][8] The gospels of Matthew and Luke in the New Testament
New Testament
and the Quran describe Mary as a virgin (Greek: παρθένος, translit. parthénos)[9] and many[which?] Christians believe that she conceived her son while a virgin by the Holy Spirit
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Pilgrim
A pilgrim (from the Latin
Latin
peregrinus) is a traveler (literally one who has come from afar) who is on a journey to a holy place. Typically, this is a physical journey (often on foot) to some place of special significance to the adherent of a particular religious belief system. In the spiritual literature of Christianity, the concept of pilgrim and pilgrimage may refer to the experience of life in the world (considered as a period of exile) or to the inner path of the spiritual aspirant from a state of wretchedness to a state of beatitude.Contents1 History 2 Modern era 3 Notable pilgrims 4 In culture 5 See also 6 References 7 Literature 8 External linksHistory[edit] Pilgrims and the making of pilgrimages are common in many religions, including the faiths of ancient Egypt, Persia
Persia
in the Mithraic period, India, China, and Japan
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St Andrews
St Andrews
St Andrews
(Latin: S. Andrea(s);[2] Scots: Saunt Aundraes;[3] Scottish Gaelic: Cill Rìmhinn)[4] is a town on the east coast of Fife
Fife
in Scotland, 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Dundee
Dundee
and 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Edinburgh. The town is home to the University of St Andrews, the third oldest university in the English-speaking world
English-speaking world
and the oldest in Scotland.[5] According to some rankings, it is ranked as the third best university in the United Kingdom, behind Oxbridge.[6][7] The University is an integral part of the burgh and during term time students make up approximately one third of the town's population[citation needed]. St Andrews
St Andrews
has a population of 16,800 (in 2012).[8] The town is named after Saint Andrew the Apostle
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Santiago De Compostela
Santiago de Compostela,[a], is the capital of the autonomous community of Galicia in northwestern Spain. The city has its origin in the shrine of Saint James the Great, now the city's cathedral, as destination of the Way of St. James, a leading Catholic pilgrimage route originated in the 9th century[1]. In 1985 the city's Old Town was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Contents1 Toponym 2 The city2.1 Climate3 Administration3.1 2015 city council elections results4 Population 5 History 6 Economy 7 Way of St. James7.1 Legends 7.2 Establishment of the shrine 7.3 Pre-Christian legends 7.4 In popular culture8 Main sights 9 Transport 10 Notable people10.1 sport11 International relations11.1 Twin towns/Sister cities12 See also 13 Notes 14 References 15 Bibliography 16 External linksToponym[edit] Santiago is the local Galician evolution of Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
Sanctus Iacobus "Saint James"
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Edward III Of England
Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was King of England and Lord of Ireland
Lord of Ireland
from 25 January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His long reign of 50 years was the second longest in medieval England and saw vital developments in legislation and government—in particular the evolution of the English parliament—as well as the ravages of the Black Death. Edward was crowned at age fourteen after his father was deposed by his mother, Isabella of France, and her lover Roger Mortimer. At age seventeen he led a successful coup against Mortimer, the de facto ruler of the country, and began his personal reign
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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St. Mary's Collegiate Church
The Collegiate Church of St Mary the Virgin is a Church of Scotland parish church in Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland. Building work on the church was started in 1380, and further building and rebuilding has taken place up to the present day. It is the longest church in Scotland, at 206 feet (62.8 metres) from east to west,[1] and is in the early Gothic style.Contents1 Description1.1 Choir 1.2 Tower and transepts 1.3 Nave 1.4 Interior2 History2.1 Christianity in Haddington 2.2 Burnt Candlemas 2.3 The Kirk o' St Mary3 Ministry 4 Burials 5 See also 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Sources7 External linksDescription[edit] The cruciform church is located in a large open churchyard, at some distance from the town centre. The church is built on a scale becoming of a cathedral. It is of a uniform and consistent design, that suggests a clear adherence to the original plans
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James IV Of Scotland
James IV (17 March 1473 – 9 September 1513) was the King of Scotland from 11 June 1488 to his death. He assumed the throne following the death of his father, King James III, (1451/52–1488, reigned 1460–1488) in the Battle of Sauchieburn, a rebellion in which the younger James played an indirect role. He is generally regarded as the most successful of the Stewart monarchs of Scotland, but his reign ended in a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Flodden, where he became the last monarch not only from Scotland, but from all of Great Britain, to be killed in battle.Contents1 Early life 2 Reign2.1 Politics 2.2 Culture3 Policy in the Highlands and Isles 4 War and death4.1 Legends of the King's resting place5 Marriage5.1 Illegitimate children6 Titles and styles 7 Fictional portrayals 8 Ancestors 9 Notes 10 ReferencesEarly life[edit] James was the son of King James III and Margaret of Denmark, probably born in Stirling
Stirling
Castle
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